Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 49 of 49

Thread: Anyone buying property this year ?

  1. #41
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    SG
    Posts
    6,232

    Default Re: Anyone buying property this year ?

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin View Post
    Correct the private price are sliding as much as 20-30% in the Luxury n high end condo! but not the mass market is on the upward trend but on a much gradual gentler gradient then compared to last year luxury's steep gradient and at a much slower pace. In some location there r some great deals! Condo not HDB!
    So in ur opinion do you think *mass market* landed property and the condominiums will continue to rise for this yr ?

  2. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    270 degree of Singapore
    Posts
    6,741

    Default Re: Anyone buying property this year ?

    I think unless it's going into recession, otherwise, don't think it will drop this year. Or wait for two more years when there are more housing or condo release, then the supply may be more than demand, then price will drop.
    Sony Alpha 700 hobbyist

  3. #43
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    TPY
    Posts
    2,681

    Default Re: Anyone buying property this year ?

    Quote Originally Posted by giantcanopy View Post
    So in ur opinion do you think *mass market* landed property and the condominiums will continue to rise for this yr ?
    Yup .... forget abt landed yes they will definately on the run! Like last year it is year of the luxury! This yr is yr of the landed!

    Like zcf say unless there is something great happen price will still be on the run like even the sub prime issue only tickle the market slows it down!

  4. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    270 degree of Singapore
    Posts
    6,741

    Default Re: Anyone buying property this year ?

    Elsewhere, price are dropping, wonder this will affect Singapore or not?
    http://www.straitstimes.com/World/St...ry_227273.html
    Quote Originally Posted by www.straitstimes.com
    As effects of US housing slump spread...
    Prices of homes drop worldwide
    Global slowdown could become wholesale collapse, warn analysts

    DUBLIN - THE collapse of the housing bubble in the US is mutating into a global phenomenon, with real estate prices swooning from the Irish countryside and the Spanish coast to Baltic seaports and even parts of northern India.

    This synchronised global slowdown, which has become increasingly stark in recent months, is hobbling economic growth worldwide, affecting not just homes but jobs as well.
    In Ireland, Spain, Britain and elsewhere, housing markets that soared over the past decade are falling back to earth.
    Property analysts predict that some countries will face an even more wrenching adjustment than the United States, including the possibility that the downturn could become a wholesale collapse.
    To some extent, the world's problems are a result of American contagion. As home financing and credit tightens in response to the crisis that began in the sub-prime mortgage market, analysts worry that other countries could suffer the mortgage defaults and foreclosures that have afflicted California, Florida and other American states.

    Citing the reverberations of the US housing bust and credit squeeze, the International Monetary Fund last Wednesday cut its forecast for global economic growth this year and warned that the malaise could extend into next year.

    'The problems in the US are being transmitted to Europe,' said Mr Michael Ball, professor of urban and property economics at the University of Reading in Britain who studies housing prices.
    'What is happening now is an awful lot more grief than we expected,' he said.
    For countries like Ireland, where prices were even more inflated than in the US, it has been a painful education as home owners learn the American vocabulary of misery.
    'We know we are already in negative equity,' said Ms Emma Linnane, a 31-year-old university administrator.
    She bought a cosy one-bedroom apartment in the Dublin suburbs with her fiance, Mr Paul Colgan, in May 2006 at the peak of the market.
    They paid US$575,000 (S$780,000) - at least US$100,000 more than it would fetch today. 'I sometimes get shivers thinking about it,' Ms Linnane said. 'But I will let the reality hit me when I go to sell it.'
    That reality is spreading.
    Once-sizzling housing markets in eastern Europe and the Baltic states are cooling rapidly as nervous western Europeans stop buying investment properties in Warsaw, Tallinn, Estonia and other real estate Klondikes.
    Further east, in India and southern China, prices are no longer surging.
    With stock markets down sharply after reaching heady levels, people do not have as much cash to buy property.
    With low interest rates helping to inflate housing bubbles in many countries, economists said the confluence of falling prices was predictable, if unsettling.
    This is not the first housing downturn to cross borders, but its reverberations have been amplified by the integration of financial markets.
    When faulty American mortgages end up on the books of European banks, the problems of the US aggravate the world's problems.
    Consider Britain, which had one of Europe's most robust housing markets, with less of an oversupply than in Ireland or Spain. Then last summer came the sub-prime crisis across the Atlantic.
    Within two months, mortgage approvals dropped 31 per cent, compared with the previous year. And in March, average housing prices had fallen 2.5 per cent, the largest monthly decline since 1992.
    'The boom in house prices was actually much bigger here than in the US,' said Mr Kelvin Davidson, an economist at Capital Economics in London.
    'If anything, people should be more worried than in the US.' NEW YORK TIMES
    Sony Alpha 700 hobbyist

  5. #45
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    SG
    Posts
    6,232

    Default Re: Anyone buying property this year ?

    Ya i read similar articles about other countries

    Hopefully there are ppl who bought high a while ago in hope to sell higher now start to sell at lower prices!

  6. #46

    Default Re: Anyone buying property this year ?

    why not rent out your house in Singapore and stay and travel to work from JB?

  7. #47

    Default Re: Anyone buying property this year ?

    Singapore is so small, public transport is so quite good, why still limit buying flat at or near town? Flats at the outskirt are still cheap. E.g. in hougang, still the same price as 2-3 years ago.

  8. #48
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    TPY
    Posts
    2,681

    Default Re: Anyone buying property this year ?

    Annaylst are not always rite n they still got to keep their job if things dun go their way! but i not saying i am rite as there is no rite or wrong just another opinon!

    MM Lee forecasts Singapore to experience growth of between 4% to 6% in 2008

    On 11 February 2008, MM Lee spoke of the direction that Singapore will be heading in the midst of the financial crisis that the world is facing, where stock markets everywhere have tumbled. Economists from our government and those of banks and financial institution’s have forecasted that Singapore will enjoy between 4% to 6% in economic growth this year. Singapore is in the centre of the world’s high growth region and is presently experiencing steady growth and transformation. The domestic growth dynamism in both China and India, and the fact that our immediate neighbours Malaysia, Brunei and Indonesia are doing well from reaping profits from the exports of crude and palm oil, and other commodities that are experiencing high prices, are positive growth indicators

    Continuing long term massive investments (about $30 billion in combined investment in MRT lines and Expressways from the government, and $20 billion in combined investment in integrated resorts and biodiesel, biotech, and solar manufacturing plants from foreign enterprises.) in Singapore’s infrastructure development will continue to prosper Singapore through urban renewal with innovation to create functional relevance in public infrastructure and real estate properties for businesses already invested here, as well as to attract more foreign investors than before; as they become more confident of Singapore’s future through our durable and resilient security, stability, predictability, government efficiency, and our trademark industrial peace between labour and management, including our population’s wide support for sound government policies. Such strategic huge foreign investments were made to succeed - not just to realise returns for the next few years, but for decades.

    Formula One is coming in September. The Marina Barrage is completed. The Marina Bay area with its integrated resorts, financial centres and high-end residences will be ready by 2011. The heartlands will continue to be upgraded and beautified more extensively as the HDB names 58 sites for the next phase of upgrading programmes. These massive investments in infrastructure development and upgrading, together with a steadily growing economy and higher incomes, will propel property values to rise.

    The financial crisis and the four demand-side measures introduced by our government recently has cooled off the property market for the time being, ridding the market of much speculative activities that had caused property prices to rocket sky-high in the mid 1990s and then plunged with the onset of the Asian Financial Crisis through the 9/11 attacks of 2001 and culminating in the SARS outbreak of 2003.

    On 15 February 2008, Estate Duty was abolished. This will make Singapore an even more attractive to investors, both local and foreign, as a place for wealth to be invested and grown.

    Economic booms and busts are part of business cycles. Inflation is an unwelcome threat that lurks and pounces on the unprepared and ill-informed, but timely strategic investments in good real estate properties will certainly be a very effective and financially prudent way to hedge against the rising inflation that is currently growing progressively and enveloping our region and the world.
    Last edited by melvin; 15th April 2008 at 04:20 PM.

  9. #49
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    SG
    Posts
    6,232

    Default Re: Anyone buying property this year ?

    Quote Originally Posted by amateur_photographer View Post
    public transport is so quite good,
    Not really. Our expressways jammed to a crawl

    Ok like what others have mentioned, it is pretty subjective.
    Not all mind taking more than an hour journey to their workplace

    Ryan

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •