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Thread: Shooting in very bright conditions. How?

  1. #1
    Evo
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    Unhappy Shooting in very bright conditions. How?

    Can anyone advise on how to shoot punchy pictures in bright daylight? Went up to M'sia last week and not happy when the photos turn out, a little exposed and quite blunt, not punchy, not happy.

    Heard people using polariser but does the film speed affects too? (I was using ASA200)

    Thanks!

    Evo

  2. #2
    Senior Member wormz777's Avatar
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    Easy. Don't shoot. Waste film only if the lighting is not good.

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    Originally posted by wormz777
    Easy. Don't shoot. Waste film only if the lighting is not good.
    agree... dun bother if the lighting is so harsh you're gonna get overexposed areas no matter what. alternatively, shoot B&W for nice contrasty pixs.

  4. #4

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    Avoid the harsh noon day sun, if you can't, use a polarizor to cut down on the glare and restore some colour and punch. You will still have to watch out for too much lighting contrast.

  5. #5

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    dun shoot when the light is no good? photography means "painting with light", its not a matter of how much light there is but how you harness the light......

  6. #6

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    Using fill flash will reduce the harsh shadows when shooting in bright sunlight. You still can't stop your subjects from squinting, though.

    The general rule of thumb is: use flash in bright sunlight, don't use flash indoors. Figure that out.

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    Default Re: Shooting in very bright conditions. How?

    Originally posted by Evo
    Can anyone advise on how to shoot punchy pictures in bright daylight? Went up to M'sia last week and not happy when the photos turn out, a little exposed and quite blunt, not punchy, not happy.

    Heard people using polariser but does the film speed affects too? (I was using ASA200)

    Thanks!

    Evo
    what kind of shoot, people or scenery and the time?

  8. #8
    Senior Member jOhO's Avatar
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    Originally posted by StreetShooter
    Using fill flash will reduce the harsh shadows when shooting in bright sunlight. You still can't stop your subjects from squinting, though.

    The general rule of thumb is: use flash in bright sunlight, don't use flash indoors. Figure that out.
    hahaha yeah i know wat u mean... kinda ironic eh?

  9. #9
    Evo
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    Originally posted by Zerstorer
    Avoid the harsh noon day sun, if you can't, use a polarizor to cut down on the glare and restore some colour and punch. You will still have to watch out for too much lighting contrast.

    No choice, pay to shoot leh! The sun was already strong in about 10 + in the morning and remain or turn stronger throughout the day. Sky's not blue enough some more.

    Heard my friend say using polariser also got to be careful is it? or one side will be darker than the other in a picture?

    Evo

  10. #10
    Evo
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    Originally posted by StreetShooter
    Using fill flash will reduce the harsh shadows when shooting in bright sunlight. You still can't stop your subjects from squinting, though.

    The general rule of thumb is: use flash in bright sunlight, don't use flash indoors. Figure that out.

    It's not shadow problem. Thing is the light too strong, tried shooting indoor with bright backlight, also no point using the flash, didn't work at all.

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by Evo
    It's not shadow problem. Thing is the light too strong, tried shooting indoor with bright backlight, also no point using the flash, didn't work at all.
    Use the highest shutter like 1/8000 with smallest aperture f/16, and slow film (iso50). Maybe some ND filter also.

  12. #12

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    Originally posted by Evo
    It's not shadow problem. Thing is the light too strong, tried shooting indoor with bright backlight, also no point using the flash, didn't work at all.
    It will work if you step down to a very small aperture like f16 or more.

    If you just use flash alone, normally the x-sync speed will limit the camera to just 1/125 or 1/200 and that will result in totally blown backlighting if you are using a wide aperture.

    If you have a high-speed sync capable flash+body combo then you could just simply set it to 1/2000 or higher shutter speed at a moderate aperture.

    If not, you will have to use a very small aperture.

    As for the polarizor thing...not sure what your friend means by "one side darker".

  13. #13
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    well.. i guess when u have to shoot u have to shoot not matter wat time of the day..

    too bright i use a circular polarising filter and cuts down by abt 2 stops.... no problem with one side darker or oether.. not sure of wat ur friend is saying.. maybe he talking abt grauated filter.. also used for birght and dark area contrast..

    not enuff?ur fastest shutter speed and smallest aperture as snowcrash suggest

    not good enuff? no choice meter off wat u want the the rest of the photo over than LL lor. at least u got wat u want...

    if there is anything wrong with wat i say, some one pls correct me.. just sharing wat liitle experience i have..

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