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Thread: Panning shot

  1. #1
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    Default Panning shot

    This is my first time trying panning shots using ixus 70.I feel that there is not enough 'blur' effect around the Proton to make it look like it is moving fast?What do you guys think?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Panning shot

    You should try to get a sharp capture of the car, then bother yourself about how to get better motion blur.

    On the other hand, you can add artificial motion blur with image editing softwares.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Panning shot

    firstly, the car isnt sharp enough (esp the front part)
    secondly, ur shot is slightly too late. the back of the car is seen (unless that's what you want), usu, ppl would like the side of the car to be captured.

    to get a more pronounced motion blur effect, u either use a slower shutter speed, or get the car to move faster
    EOS 6D | GH4 | LX100 | HERO4

  4. #4

    Default Re: Panning shot


    Panning ideally, don't panning until the back side.

    Try to panning motorcar and bicycle, as you can see the driver. Best capture when the driver looking at you.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Panning shot

    Thanks for all the advice

  6. #6

    Default Re: Panning shot

    Quote Originally Posted by dw8888 View Post

    Panning ideally, don't panning until the back side.

    Try to panning motorcar and bicycle, as you can see the driver. Best capture when the driver looking at you.
    If I'm not wrong, it's try to pan. try to panning.

    IMHO, if you were to try and pan the car, you might consider taking it via landscape, rather than portrait mode.
    One day you'll see.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Panning shot

    Hello Variodical

    As someone who has been shooting cars for the past 2 years or so, take note of these things:

    1- Contrary to what everyone above have mentioned, panning DOES NOT require for you to take the car FULL side on. although that results in a picture with more motion blur, it is often more challenging to compose, and more than often pictures come out to be a little boring.

    2- THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT: The area that will be IN FOCUS and SHARP varies - the FASTER the car, the SLOWER the shutter speed, and the shorter your focal length, the LESS area there is to be in focus, and sharp. A car isn't a small object. If you want the WHOLE car to be clear with motion blur, you need to stand further away, use a lens with longer focal length and make sure you get the right vehicle/shutter speed combination.

    3- there is absolutely nothing wrong with taking portrait panning shots. In fact, i do this often when i find good compositional opportunities and a clear, blue sky!

    4- get a polarizer - this brings the car out more and cuts the reflection from at least one side of the car, especially unwanted, ugly reflections of trees in the car's windshield. Black cars are hard to do. try white, solid coloured cars first. I must add though, that this point is more of artistic preference than technical.

    Below are a few panning photos that I have assembled for your benifit.

    The first two, is your typical walkabout lens type of panning shot. I could get most of it to be "clear" or "in focus" becalse the focus plane, your arc of movement (ie. when you pan, you are doing it in a circular motion mah) and "speed difference" is kept to a minimum. (focal length is 29mm x 1.6 crop) while keeping the cars CLOSE to the background in order to maximise the effects of motion blur. This is important!



    Also, in this picture, I kept the car relatively close to the background so as to give the viewer an increased perception of motion blur - ie. when your car is nearer to it's background, there will be more motion blur for that given focal length/shutter speed.



    ---------------------------------------------------

    The following picture was taken at 19mm (x 1.6 crop) focal length and from a front angle, only manages to preserve the front quarter panel of the car to be in focus. The rest have been distorted due to the motion differences of the car going straight, and the movement of the camera/arm going from right to left in a circular motion.



    The next one, is a typical "zoom lens" focal length that I took at Sepang, around 100mm, where because you stand so far away from the car, and you have to zoom in. Therefore, the arc of motion is greatly decreased, so you can get alot more of the car in focus.



    Go and experiment, and you'll find the right combination of **** that suits you!

    Have fun!!!!!
    Last edited by nikolaiski; 16th March 2008 at 06:57 PM.

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