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Thread: Art of seeing

  1. #1
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    Question Art of seeing

    Hi, I am newbie in photography. Since I have adopted these hobby, I have been reading this forum regularly and gaining lots of knowledge.

    So far I could understand lots of terminology and tactics of photography but I am lacking in development of new perspective or compositions. My frames look always boring and dull.

    One of my friend recommended me to improve in Art of seeing.

    Do you guys have any tips or guide for me to improve on lacking area? Any books/material/tutorial or site?

    Please help as I am lacking in very basic (framing/perspective/composition) in photography.

    Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Art of seeing

    Quote Originally Posted by ikandarp View Post
    Hi, I am newbie in photography. Since I have adopted these hobby, I have been reading this forum regularly and gaining lots of knowledge.

    So far I could understand lots of terminology and tactics of photography but I am lacking in development of new perspective or compositions. My frames look always boring and dull.

    One of my friend recommended me to improve in Art of seeing.

    Do you guys have any tips or guide for me to improve on lacking area? Any books/material/tutorial or site?

    Please help as I am lacking in very basic (framing/perspective/composition) in photography.

    Thanks.
    I think there's a book with that title.

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw...Seeing&x=0&y=0

    Oops.. there are several titles.. But this Kodak one is the one I'm recommending.
    http://www.amazon.com/Art-Seeing-Cre...4862774&sr=8-5

  3. #3

    Default Re: Art of seeing

    I would say the best way to improve is take your camera and start shooting. Practice is very important. While you snap think about how to improve the picture? where should i place the camera to make this picture look different/special?

    At the same time surf the net and study the works of other good photographer's and ask yourself why is that pic so good? The key is not just knowing the terminiology but how to apply it in a unique way.

    Good luck
    Ashwin

  4. #4
    Senior Member geraldkhoo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Art of seeing

    I find the book by Michael Freeman "The Photographer's Eye" helpful. You can find it at Riceball @ Funan.

    I find that it is not a book that you can just read through, but once you understand a concept, e.g. contrasts, that you go out and train your eye to see that aspect and shoot things in that subject. Have fun!
    A picture tells a thousand words... make yours speak a million!
    My Flickr | My Blog

  5. #5

    Default Re: Art of seeing

    If you are looking for something online... I like the below.

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/co...ots_view.shtml
    Gallery | Facebook Page Spreading the Good photography.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Art of seeing

    I feel there are some "standard composition" of certain things. View other people's work. See if the angle/composition/lighting is to your liking. I'm not encouraging you to totally mimic someone's perspective, but slowly and naturally develop your own. Good luck!

  7. #7

    Default Re: Art of seeing

    Besides the above mentioned, i feel you can start off to improve your ANGLE by just concentrating on 1 single still object. Try to shoot it from all angle. From top, under, left, right. Then if you are using zoom lens, you can zoom in and out. If you are using prime, lagi best, move your legs to go in nearer or further. Basically, besides the equipment, your legs and body are the best equipment. You can squat or tip-toe to shoot a certain object. After these, look at your shots and see which angle you prefer and brings a totally different perspective to your eyes.

    As for SEEING and COMPOSITION, i feel, shoot more and see more of other ppl's work will help you to improve. Sometimes, learning how to crop during PP is also important for composition.

    And yup, keep shooting! Don't give up~

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Art of seeing

    When you are without your camera, imagine your eyes as the frame and try to "frame" your surrondings when you are out.

    I do agree with one of the brothers above in regards as to improving by studying how other people's shots are taken. Experiment different combinations and find one that you are comfortable with and satisfied with the results.

    The Art of Seeing comes to people differently, some may get it through a book, while others practice.

    All the best

    My 2cents worth

  9. #9

    Default Re: Art of seeing

    In all candidness ... what 'level of 'art' and what type of 'seeing' would you really like to find out about?

    How to see better pictures (and backtrack to ways of how to make them), or how to understand the tenets behind the act of perception (as applied in a visual medium), which includes psychology, art history, sociology, cultural studies and reforms, geography, chemistry, biology etc etc etc?

    If it's the former, there are tons of technical and technique-inclined books to assist, and if it's the latter, you will be entering into a world far richer, and of greater expanse than you could have ever imagined which no single book could ever hope to cover, even as an introduction. However, ONE particular book is available at the nat libraries which touches on several facets of seeing (in photography) not relating to technicalities and techniques. I'm sorry ... I can't remember the title or author, but it's not difficult to locate - it's the only one not discussing photography techniques and methods.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Art of seeing

    http://www.reuters.com/news/pictures

    Reuters photos site. Updated daily.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Art of seeing

    Oh my god, so many helpful responses.

    Sorry guys could not check for last two days.

    I have noted all the responses and found very helpful.

    Thanks a lot for help, let me try shooting an object with different angles and different positions meanwhile will also check library if something is available there.

    Will keep posting my progress.


    Thanks.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Art of seeing

    Quote Originally Posted by ikandarp View Post
    So far I could understand lots of terminology and tactics of photography but I am lacking in development of new perspective or compositions. My frames look always boring and dull.
    there are two ways to go about this

    1) you go read up on some ideas for composition, some basic ones include use of leading lines, rules of thirds, and try to practise them. try alternative compositions using the same concept, understand what is going on, why one looks better than the other

    2) you don't care about it - just take frames that you think look good. ask your own opinion first, whether it actually looks good, and don't soft touch yourself, be as harsh as you can be, ask yourself what you could have improved. remember. learn.

    why does everyone insist that they need fresh new compositions though? classic compositions are sometimes, classic for a reason..

    on another note, i find that keeping the lens at a certain focal length even if it is a zoom (i.e. use it like a prime) will help you better previsualise the scene and make photography more interesting as well. definitely when you look through the lens it is not always what you get in real life, espeically for telephoto and wide angles instead of normal perspective.
    Last edited by night86mare; 9th March 2008 at 11:49 AM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Art of seeing

    I have to add Bryan Peterson's books as one you should pick up and look through.

    "Learning to see creatively" is my favourite, apart from his other famous one "Understanding exposure"

  14. #14

    Default Re: Art of seeing

    Was browsing this post and i was wondering...i've seen some of the pictures members have taken with really nice shots and contrast. Are most of the pictures edited? How do you get ..say...background sepia and the subject is in colour? Where do i get a decent photo editing program anyhow?

  15. #15

    Default Re: Art of seeing

    Quote Originally Posted by nitedusk View Post
    Was browsing this post and i was wondering...i've seen some of the pictures members have taken with really nice shots and contrast. Are most of the pictures edited? How do you get ..say...background sepia and the subject is in colour? Where do i get a decent photo editing program anyhow?
    Photoshop CS2. That's the standard software to start with. Most pictures need to be at least cropped for a better composition. Other than that, the basic would be to improve the exposure, highlights etc. Just found out that Steven Yee (very accomplished young local photographer in my opinion) conducts courses on using it. Visit http://www.knowledgebowl.com.sg/photography.html. Check this website as well: http://www.thelightsrightstudio.com/home.html. I can spend hours going through it. It has tutorials on using Photoshop.

    Hope it helps. I'm a newbie myself and picked up some info when I attended Steven Yee's course.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Art of seeing

    Practice a lot, bring your camera and walk around somewhere you're familiar... take at least 200 shots per trip.

    The purpose of this is to familiarize with your camera, lens, and of course, composition.

    Maybe on the first day you like only 1 or 2 photos... don't be discouraged.... try again... maybe next time 5 of your photos are good... try and try again... maybe one day you can get 20% good shots

    For me, learning photography for more than 10 years and still learning, I can get good result only around 10% of my total shots. My learning proccess is still in progress...

    I even bring my cam to office to shoot something I can find on my desk

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