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Thread: Films questions

  1. #1

    Default Films questions

    Recently, i have a chance to try out some professional films and slides.

    SLIDES
    I saw in this forum people talking about how good fuji provia and velvia is. And there is this so called "provia" and "velvia" effects. 1.What are these effects?
    2. What is the difference between these 2 films apart from their ISO?
    3. What are they mainly used for?

    Films
    I got my chance to use fuji press 800 and kodak supra 800.
    After developing i find that there aren't much difference, may be except for the warmness of Kodak. Grains are almost the same size.
    1. Which film would u recommend to do event coverage? Cos i am thinking of buying in bulk to cover my school indoor events.
    2. Is it justified to use these pro 800 films compared to the consumer 800 ones? I tried fuji superia 800 and its like the same.

  2. #2
    Member
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    Default Re: Films questions

    [i]SLIDES
    I saw in this forum people talking about how good fuji provia and velvia is. And there is this so called "provia" and "velvia" effects. 1.What are these effects?
    2. What is the difference between these 2 films apart from their ISO?
    3. What are they mainly used for?

    [/B]
    There are professional and consumer slides. Velvia and provia are some of the more well known and better slides around. ( kodak supporters may beg to differ)

    Anyway, velvia is famous for it's super fine grains and saturated colours. However, it's mainly used in landscape and cityscape photography as it is too slow to be handhled( iso 50) . it also gives a red cast(i think) on people hence it's not suitable for streets or protrait photography. Cant remember the cost of velvia, but Dagger is selling at $7+ per roll, definitely cheap. Velvia in ISO 100 is also avaliable, but i'm not sure of the price, or if you can get it in Singapore.

    Following the success, fuji release provia. It's comes in iso 100 and 400, and it's has very fine grains too. It's colours are more saturated than negatives but not as much as velvia. Some people claims that the colour in provia is closer to the "real colour" . Provia has a tendency to give you a blueish cast on yours slides, which i've not notice so far. this problem is suppose to be resolved in the newer provia 100F and 400F. Anyway, it's a general purpose slides, can be used to shoot anyhing. It cost about $9 per roll, or if you buy it form dagger, it'll cost $5.80-$6.

    Develping slides is cheap, and it cost $4 to develop at RGB is you're a student. Pushing will cost you $6 at RGB. BUT, printing from slides are expensive, hence if you'll be working with prints, use negatives instead
    Last edited by leewt214; 5th June 2003 at 01:07 AM.

  3. #3

    Default

    Which film would u recommend to do event coverage?
    if u choose print film ==>> FUJI superia xtra 400. cheap and good.

    for more speed,==>> FUJI press 800. not so cheap but still good.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Hi,
    actually, the main advantage of pro films over consumer films is the quality control that they are made too. They are made such that a photographer can expect the same consistent results from every roll of pro film. Of course, they are also made to higher specification such as finer grains, wider latitude and better tolerance to pushing/pulling.

    As for the 800 films, from my own experience, Fujipress 800 gives better performance under mixed lighting as compared to Supra 800. Event/ performance photographers will prefer to use professional high speed film simply because of their versatility. When the lighting levels are low, pro films enables them to push up to 2 stops or ISO 3200 and still give reasonably good results. Consumer films such as Superia 800 may not be able to withstand such extreme pushing without deteoriation of quality.

    New films such as the new Fujifilm NPZ 800 gives amazing results. (If you can find it in Singapore). You can get almost indiscernible grains and natural skin tones even in mixed lighting.

  5. #5

    Default

    Actually, for negative films the emulsion between the Pro and the consumer are the same. The difference are that Pro films are catered to be used within their optimum timeframe for best results.

    Consumer films on the could be stocked longer on the shelf and will have usually past their optimum time. But for the bulk of us, you will be hard pressed to discern any differences.

    Consistent results and color tone can only be assured if you are using Pro films that are manufactured from the same BATCH. Different batch will have slightly different shifts in color tone. This is why Pro will buy a brick of Pro film from the same batch so that at their Pro Lab, it is easier to apply the same color correction for the printing across the same batch of films especially for Pre-Press outputs.

    Shooting for school projects, go for the consumer films. They are cheaper and you will still get excellent results. I believe that the ISO 400 range should be a good overall film with a decent flash. It's not necessary to go for ISO800 just because it is meant for indoor events.

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