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Thread: Locked Mirror?

  1. #1
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Locked Mirror?

    Hi Everyone,

    Why n When do we lock our mirror?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin View Post
    Hi Everyone,

    Why n When do we lock our mirror?

    Thanks in advance!
    The conventional use is to eliminate the strong vibrations caused by the mirror movement milliseconds before the shutter opens.

    On some Canon DSLRs, a secondary use may be to prevent the mirrors from falling out ...

  3. #3
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin View Post
    Hi Everyone,

    Why n When do we lock our mirror?

    Thanks in advance!
    This is to prevent any movement when we trip the shutter, else the mirror slap may cause some movement for the more flimsy tripod setups. Normally used in conjunction with either a timed release or a remote release.
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  4. #4

    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin View Post
    Hi Everyone,

    Why n When do we lock our mirror?

    Thanks in advance!
    minimize movement of the camera to improve sharpness due to decreasing factors such as handshake

    in a perfect photographer's world, everything would be done with this

    however, it is not practical, since the lockup is minimum 2 seconds for most brands, and needs a tripod, very ley chey.

    the mirror lockup is usually done prior to a long exposure (anything more than a second, i suppose, or where you can no longer handhold it).

  5. #5

    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf View Post
    On some Canon DSLRs, a secondary use may be to prevent the mirrors from falling out ...
    Shucks.. you just made me burst out laughing......

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Quote Originally Posted by night86mare View Post
    the mirror lockup is usually done prior to a long exposure (anything more than a second, i suppose, or where you can no longer handhold it).
    It's actually more useful for intermediate exposure times (i.e. anything that cannot be hand-held to about second or so). For very short exposures, vibrations are not an issue. For very long exposure (seconds), the vibrations will decay so quickly (tens, maybe hundreds of milliseconds) that the time during which the camera shakes is a negligible fraction of the total exposure time.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Quote Originally Posted by zac08 View Post
    This is to prevent any movement when we trip the shutter, else the mirror slap may cause some movement for the more flimsy tripod setups. Normally used in conjunction with either a timed release or a remote release.
    Normally used in a high magnification setup like macro or super teles where the slightest vibration will cause a longer pronounced oscillation of the entire setup. Otherwise not of much use.
    Last edited by lsisaxon; 3rd March 2008 at 05:52 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Can be used when shooting fireworks. 1-4 seconds.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf View Post
    It's actually more useful for intermediate exposure times (i.e. anything that cannot be hand-held to about second or so). For very short exposures, vibrations are not an issue. For very long exposure (seconds), the vibrations will decay so quickly (tens, maybe hundreds of milliseconds) that the time during which the camera shakes is a negligible fraction of the total exposure time.
    ah well, i usually do it when i have it on a tripod

  10. #10
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf View Post
    The conventional use is to eliminate the strong vibrations caused by the mirror movement milliseconds before the shutter opens.

    On some Canon DSLRs, a secondary use may be to prevent the mirrors from falling out ...
    Do mirrors really fall apart?

  11. #11
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    So ideally mirror locked up is used for long exposure and tripod mount!

    But really is the difference a lot? Will it be obvious if i use or do not use it?

    Thanks again!

  12. #12

    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    hi melvin, look at this link http://photo.net/learn/nature/mlu

    from the graph you should see when mirror flip up, it introduce high vibration to camera itself that if your shutter is slow, that may degrade your picture sharpness..

  13. #13

    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Quote Originally Posted by night86mare View Post
    ah well, i usually do it when i have it on a tripod
    I did once on a telescope setup which I didn't balance properly. Even with MUp, the vibration from the shutter actually shook the setup as well..

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Locked Mirror?

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin View Post
    So ideally mirror locked up is used for long exposure and tripod mount!

    But really is the difference a lot? Will it be obvious if i use or do not use it?

    Thanks again!
    Mirror lockup is most useful on a tripod when your exposure time is between roughly 1/20s and 1-2 seconds (any longer and it is less useful) and when you are doing macro or have a long telephoto.

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