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Thread: Should i make the move to D-SLR?

  1. #21

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    "the fast AF speed and greatly reduced shutter lag are 2 of the most powerful and important advantages a D-SLR has over a prosumer cam. "


    Is that auto focus, and generally the time it takes for the camera to take the shot after you hit the shutter? Thats what i've always been assuming (just making sure thats right now)

    I never really thought about that.. but yes, that does piss me off on the 45 - particularly when we see some hot chick in a bikini walking by on the beach - we aim, shoot, and by the time the camera shoots..

    ..shes gone

    Soooo frustrating..

  2. #22

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    Originally posted by eyst
    "the fast AF speed and greatly reduced shutter lag are 2 of the most powerful and important advantages a D-SLR has over a prosumer cam. "


    Is that auto focus, and generally the time it takes for the camera to take the shot after you hit the shutter? Thats what i've always been assuming (just making sure thats right now)

    I never really thought about that.. but yes, that does piss me off on the 45 - particularly when we see some hot chick in a bikini walking by on the beach - we aim, shoot, and by the time the camera shoots..

    ..shes gone

    Soooo frustrating..
    Morale of the story, if u want to take babes on beach, switch to manual focus . The new digital will also take time to autofocus. Autofocus capability is normally problem of the lens rather then the camera body, if you have a good fast lens that can auto focus correctly, I guess there is no stopping you to take pretty ladies in three pieces suit

  3. #23

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    Wow... the lens can even determine the speed of the focus.

  4. #24

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    Originally posted by blurblock
    Morale of the story, if u want to take babes on beach, switch to manual focus . The new digital will also take time to autofocus. Autofocus capability is normally problem of the lens rather then the camera body, if you have a good fast lens that can auto focus correctly, I guess there is no stopping you to take pretty ladies in three pieces suit
    wow, a DSLR AF not fast enough to focus on a person at a beach.

  5. #25
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    Originally posted by eyst
    "the fast AF speed and greatly reduced shutter lag are 2 of the most powerful and important advantages a D-SLR has over a prosumer cam. "


    Is that auto focus, and generally the time it takes for the camera to take the shot after you hit the shutter? Thats what i've always been assuming (just making sure thats right now)
    Yup AF speed refers to how fast the camera takes to "lock on" to a subject i.e bring it into sharp focus. In D-SLRs it is definitely much faster than prosumer cams in general.

    Yes you got it right about shutter lag. One of my biggest personal gripes for prosumer class cameras. The lag time ranges from 0.3 to 0.5 seconds (or even more) depending on whether u have already prefocused the camera or not, but its still there, and the possibility of missing "The Moment" is high. U have to learn to anticipate and trigger the shutter release button in advance.


    I never really thought about that.. but yes, that does piss me off on the 45 - particularly when we see some hot chick in a bikini walking by on the beach - we aim, shoot, and by the time the camera shoots..

    ..shes gone

    Soooo frustrating..
    Yet another reason to upgrade to a D-SLR.


    Wow... the lens can even determine the speed of the focus.
    Yes...to a certain degree. Generally original lenses made by the camera's manufacturer (e.g the Canon EF lenses range with USM for Canon SLR bodies) have much faster AF response than say, 3rd party lenses like Sigma or Tamron. Haven't had much experience with 3rd party lenses, but this seems to be the case.

  6. #26

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    Ohh... i think i understand this EF thing, (means certain type of Canon lens to fit on that certain body - compatibility) but whats USM mean? I've seen some lenses with it and without it. I don't know what it means yet though.

    What about camera start up times? That had a greater impact than i had originally expected.

  7. #27
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    Originally posted by eyst
    Ohh... i think i understand this EF thing, (means certain type of Canon lens to fit on that certain body - compatibility) but whats USM mean? I've seen some lenses with it and without it. I don't know what it means yet though.

    The EF lens mount & EF lenses refer to the type of Electronic Mount Canon has designed for its SLR bodies and lenses. More details can be found here.

    USM stands for UltraSonic Motor, also a proprietary technology developed by Canon, and is explained in some detail here.

    What about camera start up times? That had a greater impact than i had originally expected.
    For prosumer or D-SLR cameras?

  8. #28

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    For both, like just in general. Do D-SLR's have faster start up times as well? Or slower? Or is it depending on the lens again?

    Thanks for the infomation

  9. #29
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    Originally posted by eyst
    For both, like just in general. Do D-SLR's have faster start up times as well? Or slower? Or is it depending on the lens again?

    Thanks for the infomation
    D-SLRs have faster start up times compared to prosumer cams. For e.g. lets do a comparison between the G3 and a 10D; G3 has a start-up time of approx. 4 secs, whereas 10D has start-up time of approx. 2.3 secs. AFAIK the start-up time for D-SLRs is totally independent of the type of lens used, or whether it is mounted onto the camera or not.

  10. #30

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    thanks for clearing that up

  11. #31
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    Originally posted by eyst
    thanks for clearing that up
    No problem.

  12. #32
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    Originally posted by blurblock
    Morale of the story, if u want to take babes on beach, switch to manual focus . The new digital will also take time to autofocus. Autofocus capability is normally problem of the lens rather then the camera body, if you have a good fast lens that can auto focus correctly, I guess there is no stopping you to take pretty ladies in three pieces suit
    This only applies to Canon SLR system since it is mainly a lens driven design, the above is not entirely true throughout all the choice of SLR/DSLRs out there. For example, Nikon bodies are mainly body driven designs, which in some cases with third party/older lenses, they are more consistent in delivering the autofocus speed one is to expect from the body. With newer, faster lenses that come with lens autofocus module designs (eg. Nikon's AF-S, Sigma's HSM), the AF response and speed will be improved, and in some cases, quite significantly.
    Last edited by Avatar; 5th June 2003 at 10:46 PM.

  13. #33
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    Originally posted by eyst
    For both, like just in general. Do D-SLR's have faster start up times as well? Or slower? Or is it depending on the lens again?

    Thanks for the infomation
    Most SLRs/DSLRs have much faster startup time than prosumer cameras but they are not all the same. The Canon 10D starts up pretty fast in <2-3 sec though not instantaneous, the Nikon D100 shines with a startup that is almost instantaneous (<0.5sec +/-), it is ready the moment you fling the switch. That said, there are some DSLRs that are pretty slow at startup, most noticably, the Kodak DCS 14n, it takes so long to startup, it makes you wonder what is it doing all these while.

    For your question, ask yourself again if you are ready to take the plunge, if you are, be prepared to spend some serious bucks on your equipment and I really do mean serious bucks. On the hindside, though some may argue you need not be good to handle SLRs/DSLRs, there is still a certain degree of learning curve that you have to surmount first before you can master light with these lean machines.

    There is no company in a clear lead right now, some may make you think otherwise but the fact is, the different systems (brands) out there have their own set of pros and cons, you will just have to accept these and move on. Most importantly, choose a system that you are most comfortable with, not one that others think is suitable for them. Good luck in your move/choices, whatever it may be
    Last edited by Avatar; 5th June 2003 at 11:24 PM.

  14. #34

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    wats the price range for DSLR now?

  15. #35

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    I think the 10D is around $2500 for a decent price now.

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