Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 28 of 28

Thread: White Balancing Question

  1. #21
    Senior Member azul123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Eastern Bloc
    Posts
    2,776

    Default Re: White Balancing Question

    Quote Originally Posted by qing02051981 View Post
    I want to learn product photography.
    I am trying to photograph an object (paper clip, pencil, anything) with a white background like those you see in stock photos.

    My Equipment
    - Nikon D70s
    - Kit lens (18-70mm)
    - Tripod
    - Self made light box
    - Desktop lamp

    Hope this helps! and many thanks for the patience with me
    I find the Whibal for such cases helps alot and since you are using different lighting (self made light box and desktop lamp) this is where it is most useful if you want correct WB for background and product items, just my 2 cents.

    ../azul123

  2. #22

    Default Re: White Balancing Question

    Quote Originally Posted by phan_vinh_nguyen View Post
    Let me try to explain that.

    WB and exposure are two different things. When you set Custom WB to your paper, what the camera do is ensure the paper will not cast any color. That mean the paper will not become yellow, or blue, or green but a certain color from pure black, dark grey, light grey to pure white. So, the term "white" in "white balance" just mean "colorless" and refer to the whole range from black to white, not only pure white.

    To get really white color on the paper, what you need more than WB is your material, lighting, exposure and PS. I suggest as following

    For material, choose a really white paper for your background, do not choose a grey one.

    For lighting, give proper lighting on your paper, not on your subject

    For exposure, use spot metering on your paper, and set exposure to 2+ stop. Ensure that the subject is not overexposed. If cannot get that, use PS.

    For PS, use color picker to measure the lightness of the paper and the subject. Normally, they are in two seperated region (that mean the paper is much brighter than the subject generally. So, use can choose the curve tool to boost lightness of the paper only while keep the lightness of the subject (almost) unchanged.
    My setup
    - For material, I am using majong paper. Any other paper more white than that?
    - For lighting, I am using desktop lamp.
    - For exposure, I guess I be experimenting with the exposure compensation.
    - For PS, I dunno how to boost lightness of the paper while keeping the lightness of the subject unchanged. Any step by step instructions anyone?

    This thread is helpful! thanks everyone!

  3. #23
    Moderator nightwolf75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    really MORE diaper changes
    Posts
    17,839
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: White Balancing Question

    Quote Originally Posted by qing02051981 View Post
    My setup
    - For material, I am using majong paper. Any other paper more white than that?
    - For lighting, I am using desktop lamp.
    - For exposure, I guess I be experimenting with the exposure compensation.
    - For PS, I dunno how to boost lightness of the paper while keeping the lightness of the subject unchanged. Any step by step instructions anyone?

    This thread is helpful! thanks everyone!
    one of the reason why your white paper is not white is becos your camera (or any camera) sees white differently from our eyes. the 'whiteness' of a camera is based on the 18% grey from a grey card. that's one of the reason why snow (for example) is grey when we take a pic, unless you dial in the compensation for it.

    doesn't matter if you are using mahjong paper or not. the results will be the same. if you want accurate whites, get a grey card and take a sample photo. open that photo in PS, use your 'eyedropper' tool to define the 'white' for the rest of your photos. alternatively, just get a Expodisc (or any of the 3rd party, cheaper variants... results vary tho) to set your custom WB in-cam.
    If Life worked on auto mode then manual mode for photography would have never existed. ― Deeksha Mittal

  4. #24

    Default Re: White Balancing Question

    Quote Originally Posted by nightwolf75 View Post
    one of the reason why your white paper is not white is becos your camera (or any camera) sees white differently from our eyes. the 'whiteness' of a camera is based on the 18% grey from a grey card. that's one of the reason why snow (for example) is grey when we take a pic, unless you dial in the compensation for it.

    doesn't matter if you are using mahjong paper or not. the results will be the same. if you want accurate whites, get a grey card and take a sample photo. open that photo in PS, use your 'eyedropper' tool to define the 'white' for the rest of your photos. alternatively, just get a Expodisc (or any of the 3rd party, cheaper variants... results vary tho) to set your custom WB in-cam.
    Is a grey card a necessary item for most photographers? Wouldn't it be the same if we measure the white paper?

  5. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Serangoon, Singapore
    Posts
    855

    Default Re: White Balancing Question

    Quote Originally Posted by qing02051981 View Post
    My setup
    - For material, I am using majong paper. Any other paper more white than that?
    - For lighting, I am using desktop lamp.
    - For exposure, I guess I be experimenting with the exposure compensation.
    - For PS, I dunno how to boost lightness of the paper while keeping the lightness of the subject unchanged. Any step by step instructions anyone?

    This thread is helpful! thanks everyone!
    if ur object isnt very white or light in colour, u can adjust the curves.

    if the object is similar to the background in terms of colours and tones, what i usu do is to use dodge and burn (for white or black background respectively).
    EOS 6D | GH4 | LX100 | HERO4

  6. #26
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: White Balancing Question

    Quote Originally Posted by qing02051981 View Post
    Is a grey card a necessary item for most photographers? Wouldn't it be the same if we measure the white paper?
    a photography gray card is calibrated to neutral mid tone (18% gray), majong or any white paper are not 100% neutral tone.

    btw, in photoshop, you mask out the b/g, and change it to pure white, usually we call it "edge out" b/g.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  7. #27

    Default Re: White Balancing Question

    Thanks to everyone here, I finally managed to achieve what I wanted to do.

    Paper can never be white when taken with a DSLR. What I did to workaround this was to use PS. I use the define white eyedropper and pick the grey area. The image adjusted accordingly.

    Thanks! Thanks! Thanks Everyone!

  8. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Serangoon, Singapore
    Posts
    855

    Default Re: White Balancing Question

    Quote Originally Posted by qing02051981 View Post
    Thanks to everyone here, I finally managed to achieve what I wanted to do.

    Paper can never be white when taken with a DSLR. What I did to workaround this was to use PS. I use the define white eyedropper and pick the grey area. The image adjusted accordingly.

    Thanks! Thanks! Thanks Everyone!
    correction: white paper can never be taken as white with any camera using full auto/semi auto modes. u'll either need some in-camera adjustments or PP.
    EOS 6D | GH4 | LX100 | HERO4

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •