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Thread: Resolution settings

  1. #1

    Default Resolution settings

    Guys,

    What is the setting for your screen resolution? They don't seems to be in 2:3 format huh? I set mine at 1024 by 768 and the photos not nice leh.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Resolution settings

    Just set to max resolution & quality and leave it at that.
    Sony Alpha system user. www.pbase.com/synapseman

  3. #3

    Default Re: Resolution settings

    I slided it to the furthest right which was 2048 by 1536 but then it went blank. Then the LCD promted ' input not supported' leh. Also, i find that setting it too high makes the words too small. What do u guys think?

    Thank u synapseman

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Resolution settings

    there is no 2:3 becos no LCD/CRT... etc are made in that ratio....
    for settings, best bet would be to follow the naive LCD resolution...

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Resolution settings

    Quote Originally Posted by iltriumph View Post
    I slided it to the furthest right which was 2048 by 1536 but then it went blank. Then the LCD promted ' input not supported' leh. Also, i find that setting it too high makes the words too small. What do u guys think?

    Thank u synapseman
    Sorry. I misunderstood you. I thought you meant image resolution settings on the camera.

    For my 17" LCD, I set it at 1024*768.

    You will need to check what res. settings your video card supports. If you select one that is not supported by the video card, then you will run into problems. Just choose the next available res. settings and stick to what you find comfortable.
    Sony Alpha system user. www.pbase.com/synapseman

  6. #6

    Default Re: Resolution settings

    Quote Originally Posted by ExplorerZ View Post
    there is no 2:3 becos no LCD/CRT... etc are made in that ratio....
    for settings, best bet would be to follow the naive LCD resolution...
    What's the native LCD resolution? Is it those found on the slider in the control panel? Thanks

  7. #7

    Default Re: Resolution settings

    Quote Originally Posted by synapseman View Post
    Sorry. I misunderstood you. I thought you meant image resolution settings on the camera.

    For my 17" LCD, I set it at 1024*768.

    You will need to check what res. settings your video card supports. If you select one that is not supported by the video card, then you will run into problems. Just choose the next available res. settings and stick to what you find comfortable.

    Mine is 19". What setting do u guys recommend? And how do i find the res. settings that my video card supports?

    Thanks guys

  8. #8

    Default Re: Resolution settings

    the native (naive) resolution should be stated on the box or in the manual... or search the monitor's model number on the web...

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Resolution settings

    Quote Originally Posted by iltriumph View Post
    Mine is 19". What setting do u guys recommend? And how do i find the res. settings that my video card supports?

    Thanks guys
    ur 19" LCD is widescreen or normal?

    native res would most prob be:
    if widescreen, res is 1440 x 900.
    if normal, res is 1280 x 1024.

    maybe u can post the brand and model number of ur monitor if u are still not sure.
    Last edited by Fragnatic; 19th February 2008 at 03:55 PM.
    EOS 6D | GH4 | LX100 | HERO4

  10. #10

    Default Re: Resolution settings

    Native resolution of the monitor is the no. of actual physical pixels on its screen.


    If you set your graphic card’s resolution higher that the monitor’s native resolution, the screen will go blank. The maximum resolution setting in your graphic card cannot exceed this native resolution because it’s beyond the monitor’s capabilty to have a resolution higher than the no. of pixels on it.

    If you set your graphic card's resolution to something other than the monitor's native resolution, your picture will suffer :

    1) loss of sharpness
    and
    2) aspect ratio distortion in most cases.

    For e.g. if your LCD monitor has a native resolution of 1280 x 1024 and you set your graphic card to 1024 x 768, a 1024 x 768 picture will occupy the whole screen.

    This means that :
    1024 pixels in picture length gets represented by 1280 monitor pixels, meaning that each picture pixel will be represented by 1280/1024 = 1.25 pixel length on the monitor.

    768 pixels in picture breadth becomes 1024 monitor pixels, meaning that each picture pixel will be shown by 1024/768 = 1.33 pixel on the monitor.

    Hence a 1x1 picture pixel will be shown by 1.25x1.33 pixel on the monitor.

    However, no. of pixels are discrete number ...........1,2,3, etc. and there is no such thing as 1.25 pixel or 1.33 pixel on the monitor.

    So, in order to do the above representation on the monitor, the original picture pixels values will have to be interpolated to get values for each monitor pixels. Due to the interpolation, there will be a loss of sharpness seen on the monitor although there is no actual change to the original picture.

    In addition :
    The aspect ratio of a 1024 x 768 picture is 1.33 but the aspect ratio of the 1280 x 1024 monitor is 1.25. So, when a 1024x768 picture get shown by 1280x1024 pixels on the whole screen, there will be a distortion of the original picture's aspect ratio.

    The above applies to any original picture size. For e.g. if you have a 600 x 400 original picture, it will be represented by (600x1.25) x (400x1.33) = 750 x 533 monitor pixels. There will be a loss of sharpness due to interpolation and also distortion of aspect ratio (original 600/400 =1.5 becomes 750/533 = 1.4).

    The only way to avoid the problems above is to set the graphic card's display resolution to the monitor's native resolution so that there will be no need for any interpolation and thus no loss of sharpness and no effect on aspect ratio as each 1x1 picture pixel is presented by 1x1 pixel on the monitor.

    Assuming that you’re using Windows, if you find the Icons and/or fonts too small after setting the monitor to its native resolution, you can increase the size of the icons and fonts through the DPI in your display properties and appearance. (On the internet, there are a lot of info on how to do this).
    Last edited by Clockunder; 19th February 2008 at 06:05 PM.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Resolution settings

    Thank you all for your replies.

    Cheers!

  12. #12

    Default Re: Resolution settings

    for hardworking Clockunder

  13. #13

    Default Re: Resolution settings

    The sensor in a digital camera is composed of pixels, which are tiny light-sensitive squares. The sensors in most cameras today are made up of millions of pixels, each one registering the brightness of the light striking it as the photo is taken. The number of pixels in the image is about equal to the number of pixels on the sensor. This number is referred to as the image's resolution.

    Simply put, the greater the number of pixels in an image, the higher the resolution. And the higher the resolution, the better and larger the print you can make from your Windows XP-based computer and printer. Put another way, resolution affects the output options for your photo. It's important to keep this in mind as you explore the resolution options on your camera.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Resolution settings

    For many people, image resolution is a very perplexing part of digital photography. Some of the confusion stems from the different meanings that resolution has for cameras, printers, monitors, and scanners. Adding to the problem, a lot of incorrect information has been spread around over the years — you've probably gotten bad advice yourself from well-meaning but misinformed friends and salespeople.

    The next few sections give you the straight scoop, starting with the element that's at the heart of the resolution equation, the pixel.
    What's a pixel?

    Your digital camera builds pictures out of tiny blocks of color known as pixels, similar to the way an artist creates a mosaic using colored tiles. (Pixel is short for picture element, if you care to know.)

    Unless you greatly enlarge a digital photo, as in the top of Figure 1, you can't distinguish individual pixels. Instead, your eye perceives the grid of pixels as a continuous image, just as when you view a mosaic from a distance. (The close-up in Figure 1 shows the butterfly's head.)

    If you want to inspect the pixels in one of your own images, open the picture in your photo editor and use the program's Zoom tool or View menu commands to magnify the display, as shown in Figure 2. This figure features Adobe Photoshop Elements 2. In this program, as in most, the Zoom tool looks like a little magnifying glass. Just click the tool icon in the toolbox and then click on your image to magnify the display.

    Why pixel count matters

    The term image resolution refers to the number of pixels in a digital photo.

    Image resolution is sometimes stated in terms of pixel dimensions — the number of pixels tall by the number of pixels wide. Other times, resolution is expressed as the total number of pixels.

    For example, one camera maker may describe a camera as offering a top resolution of 1280 x 960 pixels, and another manufacturer may characterize the same resolution as 1.2 megapixels. (A megapixel is 1 million pixels.) Both approaches are valid; they're just different ways of saying the same thing.

    Whichever terminology you use, more pixels means larger picture files because the camera must generate a specific amount of data to describe each pixel. Aside from file size, however, pixel count has a different impact depending on whether you print the photo or display it on-screen, as explained in the next two sections.
    For top-notch prints, capture pixels aplenty

    For print photos, an adequate pixel supply is crucial to good picture quality. A print from a high-resolution image rivals anything you can produce from a film camera, as illustrated by the left photo in Figure 3. But a print from a low-resolution image looks awful, as shown by the right photo. Curved and diagonal lines have a jagged, stair-stepped appearance, and fine details and subtle color transitions are lost — all a result of too few pixels.

    How many image pixels you need depends on the size of the print you want to make. As a rule, you need a minimum of 200 pixels for each linear inch of the print. For example, a good 4-x-6-inch print requires 800 pixels horizontally by 1200 pixels vertically, or a total pixel count of 960,000, which is just shy of 1 megapixel.

    Pixels per inch is abbreviated as ppi.

    With some printers, however, you may get better results with 300 pixels per inch. Check your printer manual for information about the optimum image resolution, or just run your own tests to determine the minimum pixel dimensions that produce acceptable prints on your printer. If you're printing your pictures at a lab, ask the service technician for guidance.

    Table 1 offers a general guide to the pixel population needed to print a digital photo at various sizes at a resolution of 200 ppi and 300 ppi. Again, to convert pixel dimensions to megapixels, just multiply the number of horizontal pixels by the number of vertical pixels.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Resolution settings

    Quote Originally Posted by rihhana View Post
    The sensor in a digital camera is composed of pixels, which are tiny light-sensitive squares. The sensors in most cameras today are made up of millions of pixels, each one registering the brightness of the light striking it as the photo is taken. The number of pixels in the image is about equal to the number of pixels on the sensor. This number is referred to as the image's resolution.

    Simply put, the greater the number of pixels in an image, the higher the resolution. And the higher the resolution, the better and larger the print you can make from your Windows XP-based computer and printer. Put another way, resolution affects the output options for your photo. It's important to keep this in mind as you explore the resolution options on your camera.
    eh. i tink TS talking abt the LCD screen resolution la bro.
    EOS 6D | GH4 | LX100 | HERO4

  16. #16

    Default Re: Resolution settings

    Dear guys,

    Thanks again for your inputs.

    Hehe, yes, i was refering to LCD resolution settings, not about the camera.

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