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Thread: colour mismatch

  1. #1
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    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    Ithaca, NY, USA
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    Default colour mismatch

    i use cs3 to correct the colour balance on my photos to make the colours warmer and save it in jpeg format.

    Then when i opened the picture using windows picture and fax viewer, the colours appeared dull.

    But when i opened the jpeg using cs3, the colours remained warm at it is when i saved it earlier on.

    Whats causing this colour mismatch? do i need to do any colour offset to cs3?

  2. #2

    Default Re: colour mismatch

    Adobe Photoshop is "colour space aware" and able to reach the colour space information embedded inside the colour space. Most probably, the JPEG images in question are embedded with Adobe RGB (or aRGB) colour space.

    Microsoft Windows Picture and Fax Viewer is NOT "colour space aware" and colour space used by it is Standard RGB (or sRGB) colour space, which is the de-factor colour space standard for Microsoft Windows.

    Viewing a JPEG image embedded with aRGB colour space by Microsoft Windows Picture and Fax Viewer will result in "dull images" mentioned by you. Should you wish the images saved by Adobe Photoshop to be viewed satisfactorily by Microsoft Picture and Fax Viewer, change the colour space, while saving the image, to Standard RGB (or sRGB).

  3. #3

    Default Re: colour mismatch

    Quote Originally Posted by plasma View Post
    i use cs3 to correct the colour balance on my photos to make the colours warmer and save it in jpeg format.

    Then when i opened the picture using windows picture and fax viewer, the colours appeared dull.

    But when i opened the jpeg using cs3, the colours remained warm at it is when i saved it earlier on.

    Whats causing this colour mismatch? do i need to do any colour offset to cs3?
    Hello,

    The key issue is softproofing. If you would like to make sure your image looks the same in Photoshop and in Windows Fax/Image viewer, change softproofing (menu->view) to 'Monitor RGB'. Otherwise Photoshop approximates your color to AdobeRGB or CYMK (default).

    This also means that if you want to make sure your image looks the same in Photoshop and on your printer, you have to create a custom softproof with your printer/paper profile.

    Regards
    Wes

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