Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 52 of 52

Thread: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

  1. #41
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    near the Equator
    Posts
    1,255

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Pao View Post
    So, let's assume it's established that taking pictures in bus interchange, MRT station, public places, etc. is perfectly legal, AND the employees there have no right to chase you away or stop you from taking photos...

    Then again we should question ourselves as photographers whether we want to exercise that right all the time. The repercussions may be such that we're giving photographers a bad name by being anal. As someone has pointed out, things are quite as bad as it is now thanks to "citizen journalism".

    Just some food for thought.
    That so-called excuse for "citizen journalism" and a fair number of their practitioners would have been liable for offences under various privacy related laws in most developed nations.

    Some of their actions border on the voyeuristic and are a sensationalist waste of bandwidth.
    We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities. - Oscar Wilde

  2. #42

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    1. What about "service" staff and "security" guards who are anal?

    2. Rights are rights, morals are morals. If you don't feel it is morally right to take pictures of a person dying in the street for example, you are free not to do so, you answer to your own conscience. But if some guy claims that it's illegal for you to do so, if he wants to seize my camera, delete my pictures, search me or detain me, he had better have some written law to back his actions.

    3. I leave it to moralists to debate morals. Everyone should be guided by his own conscience, his own values. I am only interested in clarifying the legal perspective.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Pao View Post
    So, let's assume it's established that taking pictures in bus interchange, MRT station, public places, etc. is perfectly legal, AND the employees there have no right to chase you away or stop you from taking photos...

    Then again we should question ourselves as photographers whether we want to exercise that right all the time. The repercussions may be such that we're giving photographers a bad name by being anal. As someone has pointed out, things are quite as bad as it is now thanks to "citizen journalism".

    Just some food for thought.
    Last edited by waileong; 5th February 2008 at 03:23 PM.

  3. #43

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    1. If it's in the law, we photographers will have to follow, like it or not. What irritates us is people claiming photography in various situations here to be "illegal" and they cannot cite the chapter and para of the law that supposedly outlaws it.

    2. Could you name those "developed" nations? In US, UK, Hong Kong for instance, you get paparazzi shooting celebs and politicians all the time. And it's obviously not illegal-- else they'd have all been jailed.

    3. Model releases are a big thing in developed countries, but it is not a criminal offence to publish a picture without a model release. Of course, one can get sued for damages, but a civil suit is not the same as a criminal case.

    4. Voyeuristic/waste of bandwidth/etc are all value judgements. Obviously, the photogs themselves don't think so. Your value judgements are your own, and they have no relation to whether an action is legal or illegal. It's no different from smoking/drinking/etc-- you may think they are a waste of $$, but they are not illegal and so the law permits adults to engage in these activities.

    5. As I said, I don't want to debate morals-- everyone has his own values, everyone should be guided by his own conscience and upbringing, and it's impossible to impose one's values on others. The only thing we can clarify here is whether an action is legal or illegal, because there are written laws we can make reference to for such questions.


    Quote Originally Posted by LazerLordz View Post
    That so-called excuse for "citizen journalism" and a fair number of their practitioners would have been liable for offences under various privacy related laws in most developed nations.

    Some of their actions border on the voyeuristic and are a sensationalist waste of bandwidth.

  4. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Sengkang
    Posts
    2,924

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    Actually, I would like to know too whether its really against the law to take pics at places e.g. MRT, HDB, industrial areas, private estates etc. The last thing I heard from my colleague who was formerly a journalist, as long as it is not a gazetted area it is ok to take pictures. Anyone can confirm this?

  5. #45
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    near the Equator
    Posts
    1,255

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    Quote Originally Posted by waileong View Post
    1. If it's in the law, we photographers will have to follow, like it or not. What irritates us is people claiming photography in various situations here to be "illegal" and they cannot cite the chapter and para of the law that supposedly outlaws it.

    2. Could you name those "developed" nations? In US, UK, Hong Kong for instance, you get paparazzi shooting celebs and politicians all the time. And it's obviously not illegal-- else they'd have all been jailed.

    3. Model releases are a big thing in developed countries, but it is not a criminal offence to publish a picture without a model release. Of course, one can get sued for damages, but a civil suit is not the same as a criminal case.

    4. Voyeuristic/waste of bandwidth/etc are all value judgements. Obviously, the photogs themselves don't think so. Your value judgements are your own, and they have no relation to whether an action is legal or illegal. It's no different from smoking/drinking/etc-- you may think they are a waste of $$, but they are not illegal and so the law permits adults to engage in these activities.

    5. As I said, I don't want to debate morals-- everyone has his own values, everyone should be guided by his own conscience and upbringing, and it's impossible to impose one's values on others. The only thing we can clarify here is whether an action is legal or illegal, because there are written laws we can make reference to for such questions.
    The intention and consequential display of the images in question play a key role. All your qualifiers do not come into play unless the intention is harmless. Then again, some of the images on that said portal have been noted to be salacious and crossing the line from journalistic/public interest value to mere visual potshots at the subject(s) at best.

    Perhaps you might want to research the historical underpinnings of why Privacy Acts are implemented in those countries and realise that value systems always play a part in the legislation of the land. Case studies abound with precedents of photographers being hauled to court with civil litigation over certain images that have been shown to be invasive, be it by the image or the action taken to secure that image.

    The very same majoritarian values also decide the interpretation of any related law.
    We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities. - Oscar Wilde

  6. #46
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    near the Equator
    Posts
    1,255

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    Quote Originally Posted by hazmee View Post
    Actually, I would like to know too whether its really against the law to take pics at places e.g. MRT, HDB, industrial areas, private estates etc. The last thing I heard from my colleague who was formerly a journalist, as long as it is not a gazetted area it is ok to take pictures. Anyone can confirm this?
    With the legal spaghetti of navigating around our statutes, you'd best seek the advice of a lawyer.

    We're all here making conjectures to the best of our knowledge and unfortunately unqualified interpretation of the law in question.
    We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities. - Oscar Wilde

  7. #47

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    1. You could be more specific about "qualifiers". As I said, I am not interested in whether images are salacious, immoral or fattening. I'm only interested in the legal aspects, because there's bound to be too many viewpoints when it comes to morals.

    2. As for Privacy Acts, I think it's been acknowledged that one can only expect privacy in a private place, hence (for example) paparazzi chase celebs on the streets, but do not shoot into their homes (or at least, it's generally difficult for them because of the guards and the curtains).

    3. You're right that value systems play a role in determining the law of the land. In the US, civil rights tradition is strong, hence there is lots of litigation when privacy is violated. However, as I said, it's likely you and I may have different values, so there's no point debating over whether US practices are good for Singapore and vice versa.

    4. What is clear in Singapore is that there are many people who think that they can stop photographers from taking pictures without having any legal powers to do so in many situations.


    Quote Originally Posted by LazerLordz View Post
    The intention and consequential display of the images in question play a key role. All your qualifiers do not come into play unless the intention is harmless. Then again, some of the images on that said portal have been noted to be salacious and crossing the line from journalistic/public interest value to mere visual potshots at the subject(s) at best.

    Perhaps you might want to research the historical underpinnings of why Privacy Acts are implemented in those countries and realise that value systems always play a part in the legislation of the land. Case studies abound with precedents of photographers being hauled to court with civil litigation over certain images that have been shown to be invasive, be it by the image or the action taken to secure that image.

    The very same majoritarian values also decide the interpretation of any related law.
    Last edited by waileong; 5th February 2008 at 11:35 PM.

  8. #48

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    Quote Originally Posted by hazmee View Post
    Actually, I would like to know too whether its really against the law to take pics at places e.g. MRT, HDB, industrial areas, private estates etc. The last thing I heard from my colleague who was formerly a journalist, as long as it is not a gazetted area it is ok to take pictures. Anyone can confirm this?
    The search function is your friend.

  9. #49
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    near the Equator
    Posts
    1,255

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    Quote Originally Posted by waileong View Post

    4. What is clear in Singapore is that there are many people who think that they can stop photographers from taking pictures without having any legal powers to do so in many situations.
    This is something that is all too common for sure.
    We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities. - Oscar Wilde

  10. #50
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    The fact of the matter is that there are no privacy laws in Singapore, and as Waileong has succintly put it, "What is clear in Singapore is that there are many people who think they can stop photographers from taking pictures without having any legal powers to do so in many situations".

    I will go even further as to say that in the exercise of such imaginary powers, more often than not, these people are in fact exposing themselves to civil, and possibly even criminal liability.

  11. #51
    Senior Member Virgo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    West of Singapore
    Posts
    4,816

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    To me, very simple: as long as there are no signs saying 'No Photography Allowed', I'll shoot. And if the authorities come after me, I'll just leave.
    Kind Regards
    My Picture Website

  12. #52
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Volcano Land
    Posts
    2,351

    Default Re: Photographers : wat to do when u are confronted?

    Quote Originally Posted by arttl View Post
    Personally, I'll just slam my press pass onto their faces n ask them to get away from me. Meet these crazy plp everywhere!

    Just dun let them affect ur mood to shoot good photos!
    Eh bro you got something we don't have mah.

    I slam my IC can? I am a Singaporean Citizen and I am entitled to take photographs as a free citizen

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •