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Thread: Verticle steam iron

  1. #21

    Default Re: Verticle steam iron

    I have used a vertical steam iron (Novita) for more than 5 years now. It is not that difficult to maintain, and it does its job very well. The biggest advantage of the vertical steam iron is that it does not damage your delicate clothes. For example, your microfibre pants will not get that glossy look after years of ironing.

    A vertical steam iron straightens out the following very well:
    - Curtains
    - Pleated Skirts
    - Dresses
    - Suits
    - Jackets
    - Certain pants (eg. Microfibre, Tetron Viscose, Wool, etc.)
    - Ties
    - Informal shirts (that do not need the pressed look)

    If you want to use a vertical steam iron to achieve the pressed look, you will have to tug and steam for quite long. In my opinion, it is a waste of time. In fact, it will take more time than a regular steam press iron. That is because... a vertical steam iron does not replace a steam press iron. They are very different.

    A good steam press iron (especially those that use hot dry steam) is excellent for ironing those cotton (or cotton blend) shirts to a crisp pressed look, complete with those important pressed lines. It pays to invest in a good one.

    So, I have both a vertical steam iron and a steam press iron because I believe in using the right tool to do the job.
    Last edited by nottipiglet; 29th January 2008 at 10:00 PM.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Verticle steam iron

    Quote Originally Posted by nottipiglet View Post
    I have used a vertical steam iron (Novita) for more than 5 years now. It is not that difficult to maintain, and it does its job very well. The biggest advantage of the vertical steam iron is that it does not damage your delicate clothes. For example, your microfibre pants will not get that glossy look after years of ironing.

    A vertical steam iron straightens out the following very well:
    - Curtains
    - Pleated Skirts
    - Dresses
    - Suits
    - Jackets
    - Certain pants (eg. Microfibre, Tetron Viscose, Wool, etc.)
    - Ties
    - Informal shirts (that do not need the pressed look)

    If you want to use a vertical steam iron to achieve the pressed look, you will have to tug and steam for quite long. In my opinion, it is a waste of time. In fact, it will take more time than a regular steam press iron. That is because... a vertical steam iron does not replace a steam press iron. They are very different.

    A good steam press iron (especially those that use hot dry steam) is excellent for ironing those cotton (or cotton blend) shirts to a crisp pressed look, complete with those important pressed lines. It pays to invest in a good one.

    So, I have both a vertical steam iron and a steam press iron because I believe in using the right tool to do the job.
    Now then i know the difference. Thanks for sharing.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Verticle steam iron

    I was at this juncture a few years back... and after doing some research, decided to pass on the steamers. Reason? Its not able to straighten thicker materials like jeans and linen...

    I brought some of my own washed clothes to the store and asked them to 'iron' them, and they couldn't do it for the thicker shirts and pants. Finally settled on a Laura Star iron. Swiss made, uses dry steam and cut down ironing time by more than half. I'd recommend that over the steamer, can go to Tangs Orchard and ask for a demo

  4. #24

    Default Re: Verticle steam iron

    Quote Originally Posted by Gymrat76 View Post
    I was at this juncture a few years back... and after doing some research, decided to pass on the steamers. Reason? Its not able to straighten thicker materials like jeans and linen...

    I brought some of my own washed clothes to the store and asked them to 'iron' them, and they couldn't do it for the thicker shirts and pants. Finally settled on a Laura Star iron. Swiss made, uses dry steam and cut down ironing time by more than half. I'd recommend that over the steamer, can go to Tangs Orchard and ask for a demo
    You're absolutely right. Like I said, a vertical steam iron cannot do the job of a dry steam press iron.

    But if you want a dry steam iron, there are many choices. I usually avoid buying anything that has a salesman doing the hardsell. Obviously these are overpriced to fund the salesman's commission. Laura Star always has this salesman that sells only Laura Star products pushing the iron real hard.

    Tefal and Philips make dry steam irons too... they are usually cheaper. They are all great products.

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