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Thread: Is it necessary to have a tripod?

  1. #1

    Question Is it necessary to have a tripod?

    What kind of shots will require a tripod? What kind can work well even without one?

  2. #2

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    long expozure shotz, nite shotz or thoze shotz where u wanna minimize handshake ...... will need a tripod .....


  3. #3

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    As a rule of thumb, for shots with exposure longer than 1/125 sec, you need to find a good support or really hold your camera steadily. For shots that will be more than 1 sec, you will definitely need to rest the camera on some support and a common and good choice will be a tripod.

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    Other than slower shutter speed scenarios, if you Zoom in too much, will need tripod too.

    Another scenario is when your equipment is too heavy, like those cannon-like lenses.

  5. #5

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    well, if your shutter speed is fast (1/125 and above), then no tripod is needed. too fast for camerashake.
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    right and wrong...wrong/incorrect techniques/deliberate shaking will be a source of camerashake too, even at 1/125 and above, unless it's really at a very fast shutter speed.
    Originally posted by silver.wolf
    well, if your shutter speed is fast (1/125 and above), then no tripod is needed. too fast for camerashake.

  7. #7

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    for 3x and below zoom, it should be oki.
    If your camera is 5x and above, when u do zoom in at these ranges, do consider to use the tripod as well.
    Originally posted by HeWolf
    Other than slower shutter speed scenarios, if you Zoom in too much, will need tripod too.

    Another scenario is when your equipment is too heavy, like those cannon-like lenses.

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    General rule of thumb shutter speed must faster than 1/focal-length for handheld shooting.

    1/125s with 200mm above lens is not recommendable for handheld and also your hand stability is crucial.

    Tripod is essential for some phototaking, depend on the light condition and your style.
    W204FL

  9. #9

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    Is it necessary to have a tripod?
    buy a cheap tripod will do n u will be happy for a long time. unless u use 400/2.8 and heavier

    General rule of thumb shutter speed must faster than 1/focal-length for handheld shooting.
    break that rule by improving your hand steadiness. here are some targets to achieve (i have done i b4 but not always):

    28mm: down to 1 s
    50mm: down to 1 s
    200mm: down to 1/45 s
    400mm: down to 1/90 s
    Last edited by clive; 25th May 2003 at 10:47 PM.

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    Originally posted by clive

    200mm: down to 1/45 s
    Done this with VR lens at 200mm end.

    But seriously I want to see ppl can handheld at 1s at any focal length, I never meet ppl can do this. Maybe you can demo your skill to me next time...
    W204FL

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    I generally make it a rule never to go below 1/60s when handheld regardless of zoom. If I need to go below 1/60s I would whip out my tripod.

    And at times if 1/60 is still shakey, flash would be probably be needed.

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    Default Re: Is it necessary to have a tripod?

    Originally posted by Crysania
    What kind of shots will require a tripod?
    When you need to take a properly composed picture which includes you in it.

  13. #13

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    Originally posted by clive
    break that rule by improving your hand steadiness. here are some targets to achieve (i have done i b4 but not always):

    28mm: down to 1 s
    50mm: down to 1 s
    200mm: down to 1/45 s
    400mm: down to 1/90 s
    i'm interested to know how you improve your hand steadiness

    often we think we can hand-hold at slower shutter-speeds, and even more often we get away with it after looking at the results of the 3R/4R print or on the LCD screen. But once you blow up the shot, or look at the full-sze image on the computer monitor, you'll see that the shot is blurred.

    tripods are a necessity for super-sharp pictures, and in general a must for macro photography

  14. #14

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    actually its not totally due to handsteadiness loh; coz i was using pro-spec bodies with ISO400 film which means

    (1)heavier weight=>more ballast like the base of a big ship
    (2)less shutter lag=>less prone to register the effects of shakiness
    (3)higher ISO of 400=> naturally the exposure meter recommends higher shutter speed, {assuming the exposure is "optimal" w.r.t personal taste}

    so these few factors help in reducing overall shakiness

    as for hand steadiness its very much like any form of shooting; body posture, support at elbows n at lens, tuck in "chicken-wing", synchronise breathing rhythm..pretty standard stuff, i guess

    the 4 limits i suggested r more like the "absolute minimun", ie so usually u wont come across it much unless like an example some time back i sneak-shot a outdoorparty at chijmes at night 9+pm , ISO 400, exposure -1 compensated, 50mm, aperture f2, shutter speed @2 seconds..i was standing stiff & holding breath quite tight

    these "getaway" methods are fast n convenient n will help u getaway to a certain extent until u really magnify the pic to really see the "hidden blurness"... so for "really non-blur" picc, then yupz, external support (tripod, monopod, sandbag, etc ) will have to come in
    Last edited by clive; 26th May 2003 at 11:47 AM.

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    Originally posted by clive
    actually its not totally due to handsteadiness loh; coz i was using pro-spec bodies with ISO400 film which means
    I beg your pardon, how come pro spec body and ISO 400 can reduce handshake blur on your picture?
    Now you said you can handheld for 2 sec and got acceptable picture. This really intrique me, I really want to meet you and learn the skill from you if you don't mind. Don't worry I have laptop, D100 and AFS 17-35 to play around. I want to see at 17mm end 2" shutter speed handheld and get acceptable sharp picture.
    W204FL

  16. #16

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    Actually it depends on what constitutes acceptable sharpness and the size of the output.

    1s for a wide angle on a 4R print has a chance of coming out relatively ok. But it probably won't hold up to scrutiny.

  17. #17

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    Originally posted by Zerstorer
    Actually it depends on what constitutes acceptable sharpness and the size of the output.

    1s for a wide angle on a 4R print has a chance of coming out relatively ok. But it probably won't hold up to scrutiny.
    which is exactly the point i was trying to explain above...

  18. #18

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    hmmz i guess this is more of a personal "psychological" thingy, hard to explain in accurate detail in words coz last time what happened was: i used F60 then switched to F100. throughout the switch i "felt" more stable with F100 than F60, its a psychomotor thingy, analogy: just like swimming, when a efficient stroke "feels" good and a poor stroke "feels" like causign a lot of water drag...so back to shooting;then i tried to find a rational reason why it "feels" more stable? after thinking for a while i kinda guess it should be due to the 2 reasons (1)heavier=>more ballast and (2)less shutter lag...i was thinking these 2 reasons sounds reasonable even though i never tested it out

    then i thought further and realised the difference b/w say ISO 100 and ISO 400: give nthe same scene, same exposure value required to achieve the "optimal" exposure w.r.t. personal taste, same aperture choosen..then since i have always usually used ISO 400 so...with the ISO 400 the meter will recmmend a faster shutter speed, quite logical and no need to test this out?

    so coz i was used to shooting under these 3 conditions...i concluded these 3 conditions help to cut down shakiness..nevertheless the first 2 conditions it would be interesting to verify it by testing it out rigourously and the see if they tally with my "psychmotor" feelings

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    Originally posted by munfai
    which is exactly the point i was trying to explain above...
    I'm agree with you. But the threshold of 1" and 2" handhheld and result acceptable is really amazed me.

    Even for a dark sorounding subject 1"-2" handheld will produce very blur highlight due to handshake.

    My offer still open, I want to learn from you who can handheld shoot for 1"-2" and produce acceptable result. If D100 not pro enough, use your own camera since I am only have F80 for 35mm and I will provide the film, processing and developing fee. I have two AFS lenses that we can try for 1"-2" handheld shoot out (AFS 17-35 and AFS 70-200 VR). If succesful I will sell my tripod for a treat, I don't like to carry a tripod anyway.
    W204FL

  20. #20

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    ok... before we get carried away, let's not turn this into an argument.

    we're merely sharing opinions and experiences, and some are also learning from what is being passed on arround here. if we must correct another person's post, or to pose a challenge, let's do it graciously without scorn and sarcasm, shall we?

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