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Thread: First Still Life Shot -- Cooper

  1. #1

    Default First Still Life Shot -- Cooper

    Hi i need some honest opinion as i'm a newbie learning the ways of photography.


  2. #2
    Member
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    Dec 2007
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    Default Re: First Still Life Shot -- Cooper

    Nice Cooper!

    IMHO, the "cut-out" of the antenna looks distracting.
    You may wish to clone it out with Photoshop.

    I should say the DOF is good and what I like most is the reflection of the vehicle on the glass panel but vacumming the dusts off the glass panel would be awesome.

    Apply a bit of A-Third-Rule in you composition helps too. No Technical parameters given so I can't comment much. You may wish to include Shutter Speed, Aperture Size etc in this post. Just my personal opinion, I'm a newbie too

    Cheers!
    SE K770i, Nikon D80 Kit 18-135mm, Nikon 50mm f/1.8D, Sigma 28-300mm :sweat:

  3. #3

    Default Re: First Still Life Shot -- Cooper

    Quote Originally Posted by SheepYeo View Post
    Nice Cooper!

    IMHO, the "cut-out" of the antenna looks distracting.
    You may wish to clone it out with Photoshop.

    I should say the DOF is good and what I like most is the reflection of the vehicle on the glass panel but vacumming the dusts off the glass panel would be awesome.

    Apply a bit of A-Third-Rule in you composition helps too. No Technical parameters given so I can't comment much. You may wish to include Shutter Speed, Aperture Size etc in this post. Just my personal opinion, I'm a newbie too

    Cheers!
    thanks. I'll make note in my next post.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    singapore
    Posts
    2,522

    Default Re: First Still Life Shot -- Cooper

    Form and texture are important elements in photography. We bring these out by controlling our shooting angle and position of lighting sources.

    I've taken pointers and comparisons off Maxwinamp's photo:
    1. A clean background. Since you're just starting out, eliminate distracting elements from the background and base. Use a piece of velvet/silk (or cloth but watch for lint and renegade fibres) or paper like Max there, while making sure the colours do not clash nor merge. They should complement each other. (Just an idea) To take it further, if you're excellent at modelling or art & craft, draw out some roads etc so long as it doesn't look tacky or silly. What you want is simple. Some of the best table top photographs are those which look deceptively simple, but took a long time for that one shot.

    All elements should flow at best case. Remove or change any that doesn't. Nitpick.

    2. Controlling lighting. Flat on lighting is a no-no, it flattens surfaces, brings the worst out of tectures, and creates hotspots on shiny surfaces on reflective material. You want to pile tracing paper infront of your flash for that soft light. Or if you use a table lamp, bring it across the room/bounce it off the wall. Check the shadows on the model, you want the light to wrap around the subject, close to Max's 3rd photo of the turrent (but not quite). Place a white card slightly off-frame to bounce light back in to fill in that shadow. Balancing light is tricky, you don't want the same amount of light on both sides, neither do you want too much difference. Try 1/3 to a stop max difference.

    3. Shooting angle. Real life 3d objects are expected to be seen 3d in photographs. Nobody wants to see the internal workings of the toy cooper, so keep it out of sight. I would also say, get a better model next time. I know it's visually compelling to capture the reflection, but it's not working that well on the cheap toy. Look for car adverts with similar use of full body reflections, disregard they use PS whilst you haven't for a moment and study their composition.

    Keep shooting and the basics would soon be second nature.

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