View Poll Results: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell/avoid

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  • Buy

    18 26.09%
  • Sell

    5 7.25%
  • Hold

    27 39.13%
  • Avoid

    19 27.54%
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Thread: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

  1. #81
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by USM View Post
    Bro, I am talking about SIA falls below $10. But you talking about $18. No chance at all.
    SIA will only go below 10 if there is a direct recession in Singapore or globally.

    u better dun broadcast your wish publicly, pple will hamtam u as many are got SIA shares...
    Last edited by raincool2005; 24th January 2008 at 11:33 AM.

  2. #82
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by USM View Post
    Of course, sell into strength.

    Then wait for panic selling to buy good quality stocks at dirt cheap prices. I am stilling waiting for SIA to fall below $10.
    They will drop arh? heard that they resume talk to take over the China Airline?

  3. #83
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by raincool2005 View Post
    SIA will only go below 10 if there is a direct recession in Singapore or globally.

    u better dun broadcast your wish publicly, pple will hamtam u as many are got SIA shares...
    yah... i'll be queuing up to hentam you too

  4. #84

    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by mohgui View Post
    yah... i'll be queuing up to hentam you too
    To think of it, maybe its time to diversify some of the investments to other products...
    Lets the market abnormalities to act before coming back.

  5. #85
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by scanner View Post
    To think of it, maybe its time to diversify some of the investments to other products...
    Lets the market abnormalities to act before coming back.
    3 ways to go.. 1) keep cash and wait for bargains 2) GOLD 3) Fixed Deposits, some got insurance like Aviva Big E plans

    btw, some analysis, STI may still rebound towards near 3,300, maybe tomm. To me buying anything above 3,000 is not attractive.
    Last edited by raincool2005; 24th January 2008 at 03:17 PM.

  6. #86

    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    bought SGX and Singtel today. cheap!

  7. #87

    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    I don't think that this rebound can loast for long, the next round of reporting will only serve to weigh the market down, that is unless poorer profit announcements have been factored in.

  8. #88

    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by raincool2005 View Post
    SIA will only go below 10 if there is a direct recession in Singapore or globally.

    u better dun broadcast your wish publicly, pple will hamtam u as many are got SIA shares...
    You missed my point. I am not cursing the stock price to plunge.

    Everyone knows that many people are holding on to SIA shares. Almost all SIA employees have SIA shares.

    This applies to SingTel, SGX, SembCorp, SembMar, Keppel Group, etc, all those GIC's link companies. These companies' share prices will not drop like free fall because some invisible hands will support them. Therefore, any dip in these companies share prices pose good investment opportunities.

  9. #89
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    this year is a very volatile year... it will up and down a lot

    however one thing i know will happen, inflation will climb and climb as Fed cuts interest rate.

  10. #90
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by USM View Post
    You missed my point. I am not cursing the stock price to plunge.

    Everyone knows that many people are holding on to SIA shares. Almost all SIA employees have SIA shares.

    This applies to SingTel, SGX, SembCorp, SembMar, Keppel Group, etc, all those GIC's link companies. These companies' share prices will not drop like free fall because some invisible hands will support them. Therefore, any dip in these companies share prices pose good investment opportunities.
    provided u got it cheap !

    however u still must be careful, i got bought spc at 5.51 and sold off at 5.80, before market closing it dived to 5.19 on unknown reason, becos of this the technicals turned bearish, lucky i took profits.

  11. #91
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by chisiang View Post
    bought SGX and Singtel today. cheap!
    good selection but got to watch.

  12. #92
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by Parchiao View Post
    I don't think that this rebound can loast for long, the next round of reporting will only serve to weigh the market down, that is unless poorer profit announcements have been factored in.
    tat why it is called a technical rebound, the very fact truth is US recession is likely.

  13. #93

    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by raincool2005 View Post
    tat why it is called a technical rebound, the very fact truth is US recession is likely.
    One possible option to go in when the market have almost self corrected itself. Best timing to go in for the blue chip kill.

    Get your cash ready.

  14. #94
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by scanner View Post
    One possible option to go in when the market have almost self corrected itself. Best timing to go in for the blue chip kill.

    Get your cash ready.
    i just loaded Sembcorp Marine at lows yesterday. Quite risky to enter now.. a bit regret to buy it at moment of impluse. lucky only 1 lot
    Last edited by raincool2005; 25th January 2008 at 10:54 AM.

  15. #95
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by raincool2005 View Post
    did u took the rebound opportunity to cut loss ?

    tonite USA will release 2 datas ; existing home sales and jobless claims, i guess it will be used as an excuse to sell down again.

    party mood from rate cut will tone down soon and reality will set in once again..
    No release the 2 datas, should be next week rite .... before the FED meeting? Looks lke another roller coaster week ahead?

  16. #96
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin View Post
    No release the 2 datas, should be next week rite .... before the FED meeting? Looks lke another roller coaster week ahead?
    released last nite liao... home sales record low (as expected) however jobless claims improved.

    there will be more rocking in the first week of Feb 2008 (which happens to be CNY preparation climax)

  17. #97
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by raincool2005 View Post
    this year is a very volatile year... it will up and down a lot

    however one thing i know will happen, inflation will climb and climb as Fed cuts interest rate.
    What happen if STI hit 2300?

  18. #98
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    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    The worst market crisis in 60 years
    By George Soros
    Published: January 23 2008 02:00 | Last updated: January 23 2008 02:00

    The current financial crisis was precipitated by a bubble in the US housing market. In some ways it resembles other crises that have occurred since the end of the second world war at intervals ranging from four to 10 years.

    However, there is a profound difference: the current crisis marks the end of an era of credit expansion based on the dollar as the international reserve currency. The periodic crises were part of a larger boom-bust process. The current crisis is the culmination of a super-boom that has lasted for more than 60 years.

    Boom-bust processes usually revolve around credit and always involve a bias or misconception. This is usually a failure to recognise a reflexive, circular connection between the willingness to lend and the value of the collateral. Ease of credit generates demand that pushes up the value of property, which in turn increases the amount of credit available. A bubble starts when people buy houses in the expectation that they can refinance their mortgages at a profit. The recent US housing boom is a case in point. The 60-year super-boom is a more complicated case.

    Every time the credit expansion ran into trouble the financial authorities intervened, injecting liquidity and finding other ways to stimulate the economy. That created a system of asymmetric incentives also known as moral hazard, which encouraged ever greater credit expansion. The system was so successful that people came to believe in what former US president Ronald Reagan called the magic of the marketplace and I call market fundamentalism. Fundamentalists believe that markets tend towards equilibrium and the common interest is best served by allowing participants to pursue their self-interest. It is an obvious misconception, because it was the intervention of the authorities that prevented financial markets from breaking down, not the markets themselves. Nevertheless, market fundamentalism emerged as the dominant ideology in the 1980s, when financial markets started to become globalised and the US started to run a current account deficit.

    Globalisation allowed the US to *censored* up the savings of the rest of the world and consume more than it produced. The US current account deficit reached 6.2 per cent of gross national product in 2006. The financial markets encouraged consumers to borrow by introducing ever more sophisticated instruments and more generous terms. The authorities aided and abetted the process by intervening whenever the global financial system was at risk. Since 1980, regulations have been progressively relaxed until they have practically disappeared.

    The super-boom got out of hand when the new products became so complicated that the authorities could no longer calculate the risks and started relying on the risk management methods of the banks themselves. Similarly, the rating agencies relied on the information provided by the originators of synthetic products. It was a shocking abdication of responsibility.

    Everything that could go wrong did. What started with subprime mortgages spread to all collateralised debt obligations, endangered municipal and mortgage insurance and reinsurance companies and threatened to unravel the multi-trillion-dollar credit default swap market. Investment banks' commitments to leveraged buyouts became liabilities. Market-neutral hedge funds turned out not to be market-neutral and had to be unwound. The asset-backed commercial paper market came to a standstill and the special investment vehicles set up by banks to get mortgages off their balance sheets could no longer get outside financing. The final blow came when interbank lending, which is at the heart of the financial system, was disrupted because banks had to husband their resources and could not trust their counterparties. The central banks had to inject an unprecedented amount of money and extend credit on an unprecedented range of securities to a broader range of institutions than ever before. That made the crisis more severe than any since the second world war.

    Credit expansion must now be followed by a period of contraction, because some of the new credit instruments and practices are unsound and unsustainable. The ability of the financial authorities to stimulate the economy is constrained by the unwillingness of the rest of the world to accumulate additional dollar reserves. Until recently, investors were hoping that the US Federal Reserve would do whatever it takes to avoid a recession, because that is what it did on previous occasions. Now they will have to realise that the Fed may no longer be in a position to do so. With oil, food and other commodities firm, and the renminbi appreciating somewhat faster, the Fed also has to worry about inflation. If federal funds were lowered beyond a certain point, the dollar would come under renewed pressure and long-term bonds would actually go up in yield. Where that point is, is impossible to determine. When it is reached, the ability of the Fed to stimulate the economy comes to an end.

    Although a recession in the developed world is now more or less inevitable, China, India and some of the oil-producing countries are in a very strong countertrend. So, the current financial crisis is less likely to cause a global recession than a radical realignment of the global economy, with a relative decline of the US and the rise of China and other countries in the developing world.

    The danger is that the resulting political tensions, including US protectionism, may disrupt the global economy and plunge the world into recession or worse.

  19. #99

    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    Quote Originally Posted by raincool2005 View Post
    released last nite liao... home sales record low (as expected) however jobless claims improved.

    there will be more rocking in the first week of Feb 2008 (which happens to be CNY preparation climax)
    Well, yesterday rally is partly due to hope. The hope that the Americian Gov has a good plan in place to save the economy from recession.

    I believe things will not be so simple. We will see more of these roller coaster ride.

  20. #100

    Default Re: SGX plunge today, would you buy/hold/sell

    STI rallied again. Recovered almost 300 points. Panic selling leads to good trading opportunities. Those who bought on Monday are making a killing now. Who cares whether it is technical rebound or not. They saw the opportunities and went in. Hence, they were paid off for the risk taken.

    For example, Venture dipped to $7.75 before powered back to > $10. You will make $3,000 within a day.

    If you just want to invest, then just buy good stocks and keep them. No need to monitor the market at all. Only traders need to monitor them. Therefore, know yourself first - are you an Investor or Trader.

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