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Thread: Jpeg Vs Raw

  1. #1

    Default Jpeg Vs Raw

    Hi all

    I came across an article from a book stating that most Film photographer prefer to shoot JPEG because once they pull the shutter they get what they see in terms of WB, EXP and Composing a frame.

    Is this statement true?

    As for a newbie like me my 1st SLR is DSLR and shooting event is very risky with JPEG as the WB might be out, i normally shoot RAW to compensate it.

    What does it means front focus issue? How to know whether a lens have a front focus prob?

    Regards
    YOU are the one who composed & create a masterpiece, better equipment only make the job easier

  2. #2
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jpeg Vs Raw

    Quote Originally Posted by mattroxy View Post
    Hi all

    I came across an article from a book stating that most Film photographer prefer to shoot JPEG because once they pull the shutter they get what they see in terms of WB, EXP and Composing a frame.

    Is this statement true?

    As for a newbie like me my 1st SLR is DSLR and shooting event is very risky with JPEG as the WB might be out, i normally shoot RAW to compensate it.

    What does it means front focus issue? How to know whether a lens have a front focus prob?

    Regards
    It depends on users. Some prefer to let the camera control the conversion. Some prefer to have full control during the RAW to Jpeg conversion, like me.

    It's not only the matter of WB and Exposure, there are other factors like how the curve is calculated by the camera and how biased it may be to certain factors.

    As for front focusing, it means the camera is focusing in front of the desired target area. You can test this by mounting your camera on a tripod or rest it somewhere which is stationary. Use a ruler to focus on (remember to use the largest aperture to reduce the DOF of the picture. Aim for a central figure and see where the sharpest point of the picture is when enlarged. If you aim at 20cm and the sharpest is not at 20cm and rather somwhere at say 19cm (the 0cm is closes to you) then it's front focusing. If it ends up that 21cm onwards is sharper, then it's back focusuing issue.
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  3. #3
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jpeg Vs Raw

    Quote Originally Posted by mattroxy View Post
    Hi all

    I came across an article from a book stating that most Film photographer prefer to shoot JPEG because once they pull the shutter they get what they see in terms of WB, EXP and Composing a frame.

    Is this statement true?

    As for a newbie like me my 1st SLR is DSLR and shooting event is very risky with JPEG as the WB might be out, i normally shoot RAW to compensate it.

    What does it means front focus issue? How to know whether a lens have a front focus prob?

    Regards
    That statement is a little oxymoron. If he uses film, then film is the medium. What's "Film photographer prefer to shoot JPEG"??? He can however choose to have the negatives/slides to be scanned into digital files of either jpeg or tiff.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Jpeg Vs Raw

    Quote Originally Posted by zac08 View Post
    It depends on users. Some prefer to let the camera control the conversion. Some prefer to have full control during the RAW to Jpeg conversion, like me.

    It's not only the matter of WB and Exposure, there are other factors like how the curve is calculated by the camera and how biased it may be to certain factors.

    As for front focusing, it means the camera is focusing in front of the desired target area. You can test this by mounting your camera on a tripod or rest it somewhere which is stationary. Use a ruler to focus on (remember to use the largest aperture to reduce the DOF of the picture. Aim for a central figure and see where the sharpest point of the picture is when enlarged. If you aim at 20cm and the sharpest is not at 20cm and rather somwhere at say 19cm (the 0cm is closes to you) then it's front focusing. If it ends up that 21cm onwards is sharper, then it's back focusuing issue.
    Tks alot, you have cleared my thought.
    YOU are the one who composed & create a masterpiece, better equipment only make the job easier

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