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Thread: Photojournalism and case study

  1. #1

    Default Photojournalism and case study

    Hi guys

    I will be doing a photography proj which I do not know how to go about doing it. Mayb someone with such experience can help and give me a few pointers.

    I am suppose to use the power of photography to communicate the facets of dementia. I am thinking of doing a case study on mayb an individual elderly or maybe a group of them in a particular home. I am thinking of doing it in a photojournalistic way, telling their story and inform the masses of the pressence of such people.

    I am not very sure as to what I am suppose to do

    ie. 1)Do I need a licence/consent to go to a home to photograph the elderly,
    2)People/info that I could look for to understand how to do such kind of a case study
    3)Given the nature of such a case study, what to look out for

    Sincerely hope that any experienced photojournalist / photographer / reporter / social worker/ individual could help me and give me a few pointers as to how do I go abot tackling such a proj.

    Thanks
    Last edited by johnmaeda; 14th January 2008 at 02:39 PM.
    A perfect photo that is empty of any feeling will never equal a blurred photo full of emotion

  2. #2

    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    Uhm.. I think the website should be cip.org.sg or something liddat. You can contact the organisations via CIP and request to photograph when there are people doing cip. It would be rather rude that you just want to go and photograph old people. Homes are not old people farms, ya?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    for #1, yes, you definitely need to write in a letter of request and get it accepted.

    one of the old folks homes i went to told me that several family members of an elderly folk did not take too kindly when they realised a photo of their father/grandfather was taken and posted online for the world to see. think of last year's photo marathon.
    tSkye shoots whatever comes tSkye's way... | 5D2, 1224, 16FE, 35L, 1.4xTC, 300L

  4. #4

    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    Quote Originally Posted by tSkye View Post
    for #1, yes, you definitely need to write in a letter of request and get it accepted.

    one of the old folks homes i went to told me that several family members of an elderly folk did not take too kindly when they realised a photo of their father/grandfather was taken and posted online for the world to see. think of last year's photo marathon.
    Thanks for the advice. Probably you could provide me with the details on which home to approached?

    Quote Originally Posted by GavinTing View Post
    Uhm.. I think the website should be cip.org.sg or something liddat. You can contact the organisations via CIP and request to photograph when there are people doing cip. It would be rather rude that you just want to go and photograph old people. Homes are not old people farms, ya?
    Thanks

    Hope that someone out there could provide me with some suggestions as to how can I go about tackling this proj? To me, this proj is not just a piece of homework but I would also like to use it to inform the masses on the plight on these people, their families and those people whom care for them.

    JH
    A perfect photo that is empty of any feeling will never equal a blurred photo full of emotion

  5. #5

    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    Do search the internet on places that care for dementia. Maybe search integrated care services, it has all the centres, nursing homes in Singapore by district, etc (www.ics.com.sg)

    How to approach this topic? I take photos for a hobby, I'm not a photojournalist. So I can't tell you how you should approach. How would I approach? From a therapist view, I do the following. Find out the symptoms of dementia, the diagnosis criteria is loss of short term memory and one other problem with performing a task, word finding difficulty, unable to recognise objects or something else (can't recall off hand). However, these people do remember the things that happen long ago.

    Show people who wonder aimlessly around a place as they can't remember what they want to do. The more severe ones even need to be restrained in a chair as they can't remember they can't walk (they will fall if they try to stand). They look sad and miserable. Then take some people in treatment, such as doing a craft, cooking which they do very well.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    Quote Originally Posted by Clement Low View Post
    Do search the internet on places that care for dementia. Maybe search integrated care services, it has all the centres, nursing homes in Singapore by district, etc (www.ics.com.sg)

    How to approach this topic? I take photos for a hobby, I'm not a photojournalist. So I can't tell you how you should approach. How would I approach? From a therapist view, I do the following. Find out the symptoms of dementia, the diagnosis criteria is loss of short term memory and one other problem with performing a task, word finding difficulty, unable to recognise objects or something else (can't recall off hand). However, these people do remember the things that happen long ago.

    Show people who wonder aimlessly around a place as they can't remember what they want to do. The more severe ones even need to be restrained in a chair as they can't remember they can't walk (they will fall if they try to stand). They look sad and miserable. Then take some people in treatment, such as doing a craft, cooking which they do very well.
    Thanks Clement. Good hearing suggestions from different perspectives and field of expertise.
    A perfect photo that is empty of any feeling will never equal a blurred photo full of emotion

  7. #7

    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    Probably someone can also suggest what books to look out for at the library because i really have no clues where to start off from.
    A perfect photo that is empty of any feeling will never equal a blurred photo full of emotion

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    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    to qualify myself 1st, i have never done anything like this before. just to share my 2 cents

    how long do you have to do this "assignment"? if you say a few months to do it, perhaps you can start by volunteering yourself at one of the homes? books and research can only describe the condition, but i believe nothing can replace the interaction with the people and knowing them.

    if you get to know them and the place better, i think it would be easier for you to get your pictures. and probably easier to get the permission from the home and the family members. i would think that it would be a more meaningful assignment.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    Quote Originally Posted by headfonz View Post
    to qualify myself 1st, i have never done anything like this before. just to share my 2 cents

    how long do you have to do this "assignment"? if you say a few months to do it, perhaps you can start by volunteering yourself at one of the homes? books and research can only describe the condition, but i believe nothing can replace the interaction with the people and knowing them.

    if you get to know them and the place better, i think it would be easier for you to get your pictures. and probably easier to get the permission from the home and the family members. i would think that it would be a more meaningful assignment.
    Thanks headfonz . I guess its time for me to do some community work. I do agree with you that no amount of research can replace the interaction with them.
    A perfect photo that is empty of any feeling will never equal a blurred photo full of emotion

  10. #10
    Senior Member zoossh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    Quote Originally Posted by tSkye View Post
    for #1, yes, you definitely need to write in a letter of request and get it accepted.

    one of the old folks homes i went to told me that several family members of an elderly folk did not take too kindly when they realised a photo of their father/grandfather was taken and posted online for the world to see. think of last year's photo marathon.
    do you think there is an element of personal guilt and shame felt for sending their parents to homes?

    perhaps it is an asian mentality over certain things which is not something we can overcome. i wonder if the folks does not mind at all (provided their mental status is sound) and agreed to have their photograph taken, does the family have any moral rights to express dissatisfaction? just a personal thought.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    Quote Originally Posted by zoossh View Post
    do you think there is an element of personal guilt and shame felt for sending their parents to homes?

    perhaps it is an asian mentality over certain things which is not something we can overcome. i wonder if the folks does not mind at all (provided their mental status is sound) and agreed to have their photograph taken, does the family have any moral rights to express dissatisfaction? just a personal thought.
    I would say if the family members of these patients do not have the necessary knowledge and patience to take care of them, it would be better to let those who are professionally trained to help in taking care of them. At least they would be taken care of better.
    A perfect photo that is empty of any feeling will never equal a blurred photo full of emotion

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Photojournalism and case study

    Quote Originally Posted by zoossh View Post
    do you think there is an element of personal guilt and shame felt for sending their parents to homes?

    perhaps it is an asian mentality over certain things which is not something we can overcome. i wonder if the folks does not mind at all (provided their mental status is sound) and agreed to have their photograph taken, does the family have any moral rights to express dissatisfaction? just a personal thought.
    I talked to one before, a very lonely fella. Everyday he'll just wheelchair himself to the window and look outside the field. My opinion is if he is willing, and able to prove his sanity and stuff, I guess the family has no say on this matter. Tis a shame what they do. Most of the time, it's because of convenience, not inability.
    tSkye shoots whatever comes tSkye's way... | 5D2, 1224, 16FE, 35L, 1.4xTC, 300L

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