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Thread: Changing Lens Outdoor

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by OlyFlyer View Post
    I don't know which camera you use, or plan to use, but if you have an Olympus dSLR, you really don't need to be very careful at all. Of course, extreme conditions should be avoided, but changing outdoors, besides streets or on the beach is not an issue.
    You still have to take care, and I AM an Oly dSLR user (for those who don't know me). While the SSWF does keep the sensor clean of most dust (and I've NEVER had to manually clean my sensor in the 2.5 years I've owned my Oly dSLR thanks to its SSWF), it doesn't stop pollen or anything else that's sticky from sticking. As well it doesn't stop dust from getting on the mirrors, focus screen, or focus sensor.

    I don't like being so carefree with my camera, I won't leave it without a lens or body cover for more than a few seconds, if it's windy I'd point the camera away from the wind if I'm in a dusty environment, and I will blow out the mirror box if I have changed lenses in a dusty environment, if I've made a lot of lens changes during an outing, or just before an important shoot.

    Pointing the camera down without a lens and using a blower like the Giottos Rocket Blower (NOT canned air) and letting the dust fall out will reduce the chances for dust on the sensor (like when the mirror flaps and the shutter opens, and the sensor which has a static charge attracts the dust).

    Having a built-in sensor cleaner doesn't mean you should stop being careful and take risks.
    Last edited by Mikefellh; 16th January 2008 at 06:35 PM.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikefellh View Post
    You still have to take care, and I AM an Oly dSLR user (for those who don't know me). While the SSWF does keep the sensor clean of most dust (and I've NEVER had to manually clean my sensor in the 2.5 years I've owned my Oly dSLR thanks to its SSWF), it doesn't stop pollen or anything else that's sticky from sticking. As well it doesn't stop dust from getting on the mirrors, focus screen, or focus sensor.

    I don't like being so carefree with my camera, I won't leave it without a lens or body cover for more than a few seconds, if it's windy I'd point the camera away from the wind if I'm in a dusty environment, and I will blow out the mirror box if I have changed lenses in a dusty environment, if I've made a lot of lens changes during an outing, or just before an important shoot.

    Pointing the camera down without a lens and using a blower like the Giottos Rocket Blower (NOT canned air) and letting the dust fall out will reduce the chances for dust on the sensor (like when the mirror flaps and the shutter opens, and the sensor which has a static charge attracts the dust).

    Having a built-in sensor cleaner doesn't mean you should stop being careful and take risks.
    i think olyflyer does not means not being careful, what he means is no need to be so so concern over the dust issue.. he did mention that under extreme condition, one still had to be careful..

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by kitchionh View Post
    Hi All,

    Just checking, apart from not dropping the lens, are there any precautions to take while changing lens outdoor?

    Rgds,
    for me i will try to refrain my camera sensor from being exposed to dust by trying to change it in the fasteest amount of time and for dropping of lens i normally carry a big bag so if drop will be within the bag not on the floor
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  4. #24

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by slypower50 View Post
    i think olyflyer does not means not being careful, what he means is no need to be so so concern over the dust issue.. he did mention that under extreme condition, one still had to be careful..
    Actually, Olyflyer didn't answer threadstarter's question but only posted to boost about how good Olympus's Dust reduction system is and that if threadstarter had bought a Olympus DSLR, then he would have very little dust problems just like Olyflyer has had.

    If threadstarter isn't using an Olympus DSLR, then Olyflyer's reply is totally useless.

    If one bothers to make a check on threadstarter's post history, he is apparently a Nikon user.

    In contrast, Mikefellh's reply consisting of some general precautions to take is at least answers threadstarter's question.
    Last edited by Clockunder; 16th January 2008 at 10:49 PM.

  5. #25

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by Clockunder View Post
    Actually, Olyflyer didn't answer threadstarter's question but only posted to boost about how good Olympus's Dust reduction system is and that if threadstarter had bought a Olympus DSLR, then he would have very little dust problems just like Olyflyer has had.
    Of course I answered the question, I did it my way. I never take ANY special precautions when I change lens, except in extreme conditions. I explained why. I also explained which cameras has and has not the SSFW. I NEVER changed lens with the camera pointing to the ground, I don't want to break my neck. That's just it. I just explain how I do, if you do it differently, well, that's OK for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clockunder View Post
    If threadstarter isn't using an Olympus DSLR, then Olyflyer's reply is totally useless.
    That is very true, which I believe I also say in my post, but it is made very clear anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clockunder View Post
    If one bothers to make a check on threadstarter's post history, he is apparently a Nikon user.
    Well, I did not bother to do that. This is newbies corner, for all I know, he may not even have a camera and just planning to buy one. Anyway, if he has a history, he could have mentioned that. I more like interpreted he is thinking about a camera. This is NOT a Nikon, Canon or any other brand subthread, it is a Newbies corner for ANY brand. Does he have a dSLR, or a Nikon P&S? Yes, I could try to look at his history, but I will not.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clockunder View Post
    In contrast, Mikefellh's reply consisting of some general precautions to take is at least answers threadstarter's question.
    Yes, after my contribution, there is no point repeating what I said. That is his way of changing lenses. I see his post complementing mine, but you are the judge it seems, so you know it better.

  6. #26

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikefellh View Post
    You still have to take care, and I AM an Oly dSLR user (for those who don't know me). While the SSWF does keep the sensor clean of most dust (and I've NEVER had to manually clean my sensor in the 2.5 years I've owned my Oly dSLR thanks to its SSWF), it doesn't stop pollen or anything else that's sticky from sticking. As well it doesn't stop dust from getting on the mirrors, focus screen, or focus sensor.

    I don't like being so carefree with my camera, I won't leave it without a lens or body cover for more than a few seconds, if it's windy I'd point the camera away from the wind if I'm in a dusty environment, and I will blow out the mirror box if I have changed lenses in a dusty environment, if I've made a lot of lens changes during an outing, or just before an important shoot.

    Pointing the camera down without a lens and using a blower like the Giottos Rocket Blower (NOT canned air) and letting the dust fall out will reduce the chances for dust on the sensor (like when the mirror flaps and the shutter opens, and the sensor which has a static charge attracts the dust).

    Having a built-in sensor cleaner doesn't mean you should stop being careful and take risks.
    I know that, remember, we have discussed focusing problems both here and on dpr. I even every time somebody mentions focus problems direct him/her to our discussions and my images. My interpretation of the post was image sensor concerns. I don't think that is a concern really, other than in extreme conditions, as I mentioned. Anyway, yes. being careful never hurts, but I don't change lens in any strange body position, and never think twice (except under certain conditions) if and where I should change lens, and I never hold my camera pointing down. No point, because dust (and pollen) is actually pushed upwards by the warmer air rising. So, I call that just overacting, and may even be counter productive. But of course, we don't have to agree.

  7. #27

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by OlyFlyer View Post
    Of course I answered the question, I did it my way. I never take ANY special precautions when I change lens, except in extreme conditions. I explained why. I also explained which cameras has and has not the SSFW. I NEVER changed lens with the camera pointing to the ground, I don't want to break my neck. That's just it. I just explain how I do, if you do it differently, well, that's OK for me.

    That is very true, which I believe I also say in my post, but it is made very clear anyway.

    Well, I did not bother to do that. This is newbies corner, for all I know, he may not even have a camera and just planning to buy one. Anyway, if he has a history, he could have mentioned that. I more like interpreted he is thinking about a camera. This is NOT a Nikon, Canon or any other brand subthread, it is a Newbies corner for ANY brand. Does he have a dSLR, or a Nikon P&S? Yes, I could try to look at his history, but I will not.

    Yes, after my contribution, there is no point repeating what I said. That is his way of changing lenses. I see his post complementing mine, but you are the judge it seems, so you know it better.
    The intention of your first post in this thread is very clear.

    A picture and a link speak a million words and I rest my case (p.s. for every reason to get an Olympus, there is a reason not to get Olympus. Ditto for other brands. Only seeing and boosting the advantages without also looking at the disadvantages is just folly. ) :

    http://forums.clubsnap.com/showthread.php?t=343713

    Last edited by Clockunder; 17th January 2008 at 09:16 AM.

  8. #28
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    OMG, TS just want to know how to change a lens only,
    how come become advertisement corner?

    anyway to TS,

    the way to change a lens,
    cover the front lens cap on the lens on the camera,
    place the lens you want to use on the surface with lens face down,
    just loosen the rear lens cap, but still cover the lens,
    dismount the lens from camera, place it beside the lens you want to use,
    remove the rear lens cap from the lens you want to use,
    and cover the rear lens cap to the lens just dismounted
    take up the lens and mount it to you camera.
    you should keep you camera vertical or facing downward when the lens dismounting and mounting.
    so you are keeping the lens changing time to a minimum.

    if you change a lens at outdoor,
    try to squat down and change the lens,
    so if you happen that you drop your lens,
    it will not drop a few feet but only a few inches.

    and also a good idea to open your camera bag and change your lens on top of it,
    so you lens will not kiss the ground if you drop it.

    OT, I always doubtful why someone want to boost around about how good the camera or lens he/she own, as a photographer, ones should take pride what images he/she can create, not what equipments he/she own.
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  9. #29

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    don't use a DSLR is you really scare about dust while changing lens.

  10. #30

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    I don't care the environment, if I need to change, I'll just change... At most go home clean sensor only...

    If so afraid of dust, might as well get one body for each lens... or get a PROsumer instead...
    I am NOT a PROfessional photographer and photography is NOT my hobby

  11. #31

    Question Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    I read that the Canon 40D has an ultrasonic cleaning system.

    "The sensor shakes up the plate to displace dirt everytime you turn the cam on and off. It's a joy to know that moisture and dust won't be clinging to your battery and CF cards like jealous girlfriends with the 40D's additional weather sealing." - T3 Philippines

    So does this ultrasonic cleaning system minimises the problem of dusts entering during lens change outdoors? And are there other cameras out there with this feature? Thanks.

  12. #32
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    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Don't ever start a brand war here. Now back to topic.
    Canon EOS 5D, 24-70 f/4 L IS, 50 f/1.2 L, 70-300 f/4-5.6 L IS, 600EX-RT. Sigma 12-24 f/4.5-5.6 EX.

  13. #33

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by Clockunder View Post
    The intention of your first post in this thread is very clear.
    The intention of my post was information, nothing else. Every other interpretation is your own narrow minded problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clockunder View Post
    A picture and a link speak a million words and I rest my case (p.s. for every reason to get an Olympus, there is a reason not to get Olympus. Ditto for other brands. Only seeing and boosting the advantages without also looking at the disadvantages is just folly. ) :

    Thank you for going through the trouble to make a screen capture and enlarging of my words about this not being a Canon or any other brand forum, but the Newbies corner, so information should be given even about Olympus solution. I could have quoted that if you really wanted it, no secrets here.

    You really make a big deal out of it, don't you think so?

    Yes, I agree at least what you say about Olympus and other brand, including Canon. For every reason to get an Olympus, there is a reason not to get Olympus, but also, the same is valid for any other brand, even Canon. Since I don't think I say Get Olympus, I see no connection between your comment and the thread, TS does not ask about any reason to get any camera. Please read my post more carefully before jumping on me like that.

    As for boosting the advantages of Olympus, well, you like it or not, only lens change was the question here. In that regard Olympus is way better than any other brand or model right now on the world market. There are other points as well, where Olympus is equally good or better than others, those I did not mention here, because it was not asked for, not part of the subject. Of course, there are points where Olympus is worse as well, by no means I say Olympus is best in everything. But, as for dust and cleaning problems which is the subject here, it is a fact that the Olympus community is either badly informed about the problem, not capable to identify the issue, bad photographers or the lens changing is not a big issue because of a well proven, working in-built system, the SSWF. You figure out which is true. Also, here in my country which is Sweden, currently one big brand is offering three free CCD cleaning during the first two years and the other is offered with a free set of cleaning kit plus a course on cleaning the CCD, but of course, they do say not to do it at home and definitely not during warranty. Olympus is offering mostly bags, CF cards, battery grip or other gadgets. Why is that so?

    Quote Originally Posted by OlyFlyer
    I don't know which camera you use, or plan to use, but if you have an Olympus dSLR, you really don't need to be very careful at all. Of course, extreme conditions should be avoided, but changing outdoors, besides streets or on the beach is not an issue. It has the wolds best built in cleaning system, called SSWF, and it works well since several years. It has been introduced with the E-1 and I don't think many Olympus owners have cleaned their sensor yet.

    Much can be said about the Olympus cameras, but lens changing is definitely not an issue. I never paid any attention to where I change lens during the past two years, and I change lens often, indoors and outdoors. I hold my camera in the most comfortable way when changing lens.
    This is what I say, and I stand for that. My words are ONLY about lens changing and how I do it and why. I am not even saying how it should be done, or that one does not have to be careful. Of course, being careful can never hurt, I am also very careful about how I handle my gear, but all that holding the camera in any special way is just pure nonsense in regard to dust and pollen and other equally fine particles. Regardless of which, I have no idea how big the problem actually is, that's why it is important to mention I have Olympus. Generally, with other brand, it may be a big issue, but I have no other experience.

  14. #34

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    and also a good idea to open your camera bag and change your lens on top of it,
    so you lens will not kiss the ground if you drop it.
    The best advice so far here.

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    OT, I always doubtful why someone want to boost around about how good the camera or lens he/she own, as a photographer, ones should take pride what images he/she can create, not what equipments he/she own.
    Sure, but this thread is not about photography, but a how to...

    Different cameras, different problems, different techniques and different solutions. All dSLR cameras are capable of taking good images, wouldn't you agree it is the photographer, not the camera who takes the images? The camera is just a tool. The boring classical argument about the gear.

  15. #35

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by cd.ceniza View Post
    I read that the Canon 40D has an ultrasonic cleaning system.
    That's good. Finally even other brand realize the need for it.

    Quote Originally Posted by cd.ceniza View Post
    "The sensor shakes up the plate to displace dirt everytime you turn the cam on and off. It's a joy to know that moisture and dust won't be clinging to your battery and CF cards like jealous girlfriends with the 40D's additional weather sealing." - T3 Philippines
    That's a joke, isn't it? I know nothing about Canon, but I definitely doubt it shakes the camera free of anything. Definitely not the battery and the CF cards. Of course, I could be wrong...


    Quote Originally Posted by cd.ceniza View Post
    So does this ultrasonic cleaning system minimises the problem of dusts entering during lens change outdoors? And are there other cameras out there with this feature? Thanks.
    The way it works in my camera (not allowed to mention the brand, some people are sensitive) is that there is a thin membrane in front of the CCD. Every time I turn on my camera of unmentionable brand the membrane is shaken at very high speed for about 1 second. If anything got stuck on it before, it shakes it off and the stuff is collected on the bottom in some mysterious way. It does now take care of every type of particle, you can still get problems with some sticky stuff, or a combination of moisture and different residue, but it works very well and is very reliable. If it should be activated at camera turn on or turn off time (or both) is discutable. It is as it is, and that is good enough for us who have it.

    We, who use this brand (not allowed to mention the name) are happy with it and we have to be less careful and clean our CCDs less often than others. How often we have to do it, well, I have no idea. I have only had my camera for about two years, changed lenses only about 5-10 times a day and only took about 30k images during this period, which does not make me an expert. Anyway, so far, I have not done any cleaning because I am blind, or don't have problem. Whichever.

    But, as another fellow who also uses the same brand as I (which we should not mention here) is more careful, and as he rightfully points out, the system in our camera does not prevent the cr@p entering the lens bay, where it can cause focusing problems, and if the cr@p is sticky, it can get stuck to this membrane. Anyway, the system is reliable as far as I know, but it won't make you a better photographer which is also rightfully pointed out above.

    Don't ask me for my camera brand, I won't tell you because it is advertisement, and since I am not geting paid for it, I won't mention it. But if Canon has introduced it as well, it must be worth something for some people. I also believe Sony and some other brand has it as well, I advise you to post a question on every thread, not here where we are not allowed to mention brand names except a few, mostly the Big 2.

  16. #36

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by Youhong View Post
    If so afraid of dust, might as well get one body for each lens...
    That is very true...

    Quote Originally Posted by Youhong View Post
    or get a PROsumer instead...
    ...but in what way is it better with a PROsumer camera? Is the dust affraid of pro photogs?

  17. #37
    Senior Member dorts's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    I knew this will happen, so I didn't post here initially.

    Olyflyer meant no harm, neither, advertising. He is just stating facts. So please, just stop here.

    Like Olyflyer said, I need not take much precautions as my camera shakes off dust when I turn on my camera. (Not naming brands) And it is really effective. The other brands have this too, but about effectiveness, not proven yet. As technology advances, I believe they will be just as effective, and soon, you need not be afraid of dust anymore. Let the dust be scared of you instead of you scared of the dust.

    Here is what I do.

    1) Sling camera onto neck.
    2) Remove lens.
    3) Cover the rear and front with cap and put in bag.
    4) Remove other lens, and caps.
    5) Mount on camera.

    As simple as that. But you better be careful not to drop your lens. I almost did.

  18. #38
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    whenever I see or hear somebody says his/her cameras or lenses very good very good.

    One thing for sure, this person is telling you the truth, his/her cameras or lenses is far better than his/her photos.

    I have seem enough, and I know my camera is so so, my images is also so so, and many other younger photographers can take better photos than me, I have nothing to boost about nowadays, so you guys hardly see me post photo for quite sometime already.
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  19. #39
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    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by slypower50 View Post
    i think olyflyer does not means not being careful, what he means is no need to be so so concern over the dust issue.. he did mention that under extreme condition, one still had to be careful..
    Quote Originally Posted by OlyFlyer View Post
    That's good. Finally even other brand realize the need for it.

    That's a joke, isn't it? I know nothing about Canon, but I definitely doubt it shakes the camera free of anything. Definitely not the battery and the CF cards. Of course, I could be wrong...


    The way it works in my camera (not allowed to mention the brand, some people are sensitive) is that there is a thin membrane in front of the CCD. Every time I turn on my camera of unmentionable brand the membrane is shaken at very high speed for about 1 second. If anything got stuck on it before, it shakes it off and the stuff is collected on the bottom in some mysterious way. It does now take care of every type of particle, you can still get problems with some sticky stuff, or a combination of moisture and different residue, but it works very well and is very reliable. If it should be activated at camera turn on or turn off time (or both) is discutable. It is as it is, and that is good enough for us who have it.

    We, who use this brand (not allowed to mention the name) are happy with it and we have to be less careful and clean our CCDs less often than others. How often we have to do it, well, I have no idea. I have only had my camera for about two years, changed lenses only about 5-10 times a day and only took about 30k images during this period, which does not make me an expert. Anyway, so far, I have not done any cleaning because I am blind, or don't have problem. Whichever.

    But, as another fellow who also uses the same brand as I (which we should not mention here) is more careful, and as he rightfully points out, the system in our camera does not prevent the cr@p entering the lens bay, where it can cause focusing problems, and if the cr@p is sticky, it can get stuck to this membrane. Anyway, the system is reliable as far as I know, but it won't make you a better photographer which is also rightfully pointed out above.

    Don't ask me for my camera brand, I won't tell you because it is advertisement, and since I am not geting paid for it, I won't mention it. But if Canon has introduced it as well, it must be worth something for some people. I also believe Sony and some other brand has it as well, I advise you to post a question on every thread, not here where we are not allowed to mention brand names except a few, mostly the Big 2.
    Wah, your camera best in the world is it? Wah, your opinions also best in the world! You so good - you da man!

  20. #40

    Default Re: Changing Lens Outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by syl View Post
    Wah, your camera best in the world is it? Wah, your opinions also best in the world! You so good - you da man!
    Sure I am good. You are right. Please, read my lips and repeat after me:

    Quote Originally Posted by OlyFlyer
    Different cameras, different problems, different techniques and different solutions. All dSLR cameras are capable of taking good images, wouldn't you agree it is the photographer, not the camera who takes the images? The camera is just a tool.
    But if you say my camera is the best in the world, well, I think I must disagree with you. It is however definitely the best in the world for me, because that is my only one. Altough, not for lon because hopefully I will soon be the owner of a new one, the model and the brand may not be mentioned here, since some people get offended if the brand is mantioned here. Anyway, not even my new, unmentionable will be the worlds best camera, only my best one.

    Cheers and have a good shooting with whatever you have.

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