Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 84

Thread: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

  1. #21
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    1,568

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by conquer500 View Post
    solve by getting your basic understanding of your camera.

    I hateto be the wet blanket and a-hole. But this is the one best answer to this TS' question. In fact do a search of all the questions asked.


    dotaboy..with all due respect. You will be doing yourself a favour in more ways then one if you read your camera manual but before that read up one photography 101. Reading your camera manual will not help you because from the many threads you posted it is very clear, you almost have no idea about the concept photography. Yes we can help with tips here and there but what you are asking is for people you write you pages and pages of stuff for free and tell you short cut answer without teach you the fundamenta behind it. When you don't understand that, you will not remember it. I have no problem like everyone else giving free tips and advice but what I am wondering if you even understood what anyone of us is telling you so you can best understand the technical stuff of using a camera and how your gear works, how light is capture, what a lens does, why not every lens can shoot at extreme closeness, how flash work, what is iso....etc I ask this as I have been observing and I had to stop myself from writing to explain some of the stuff you asked for as I think you will not understand anything I wrote.

    You really want to learn all this...don't search the threads here. I would advice you buy some good books as it will be the BEST investment you will ever get and if you can't afford it after getting your DSLR and gear...I would say go to the library. It is almost too hard for anybody to explain anything to you especially if there is no pictorial illustration to help you grasp the techinicalities. It has come to the point that some actually now think you have a problematice camera instead that maybe you have no idea about photography and thus don't know how to ask the question. So I am going to be "cruel to be kind to you" as I really am concern for you, when I say...get some proper books and learn it the right way. Not bits and piece here and there in this forum. You will not get much help here without people writing long exhautive explanation that may or may not benefit you at all. And to me that is my concern... how much of it will benefit you after everyone has taken the time to answer your question. Others with some basic would benefit from reading them but in the end...would you?

    Lastly....don't believe all the stuff you heard from camera advertisement that DSLR are so easy to use, so sophicticated that it does everything for you and every problem is easily solved and it is just a click away from one of your camera's dial or button. SOme time some techinical problem like lighting or shooting mico shoot might mean have to spend more money to get what effect or shot you want. But you need to know your fundemental before you can do that. As you start to learn more...you will find that not all camera or lens or talent is created equal. And you will never know that or enjoy your new hobby to the max till you learn the basis. And that is something you just can't get it here. You will benefit alot more from tips and advice once you have learnt your basic!!!

    No offend but this is how I see. Yes we all have to start somewhere but the best advice I can give you ...buy some good books on the subject of photography basics. And then go take your camera out to do some practical so you really understand how your camera works.
    Last edited by sammy888; 9th January 2008 at 09:15 PM.

  2. #22
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    East
    Posts
    11,755

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Duh...

    Of course black lah... kaoz, Please read up on the exposure relation of shutter speed, aperture and ISO first.

    Your camera would have been set to the largest aperture already and yet the meter should be all the way to the right signifying under-exposure.
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  3. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Eastnorth
    Posts
    680

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Do post 1 or 2 photos which you said turns out dark and provide the following details, so that we can help you find the problem:
    1) Shutter speed
    2) Aperture value
    3) ISO value

    and if possible these too:
    4) Time of day
    5) Location (indoors/outdoors/shade)
    6) Aperture range of lens you are using (f2.8-f4/f3.5-f5.6/etc)
    7) Age and condition of camera


    Or to do a comparative check on your own:
    1st) Take a picture with the settings that you normally use.
    2nd) If it turns out dark, then set your camera to full-auto mode, set it on a stationary surface and take the same picture (same angle, distance, time of day, lighting conditions)

    If the auto mode comes out properly exposed, then your normal settings are wrong, and/or you need faster lens, and/or your ISO setting is too low, and/or you need to learn more about exposure.

    But if the auto mode also comes out dark, then send your camera for servicing. Good luck.
    Last edited by blueayz; 9th January 2008 at 09:20 PM.

  4. #24
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodlands
    Posts
    291

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by zerartul View Post
    Lol 1/2500 and 1/4000 is a very different affair. Unless it darn bright sunlight, it will probably be black picture unless the aperature is really big. Under my house lighting, the best I can go is 1/30 F2.8 ISO800. So no way 1/4000 is going to produce any visible picture(at least for me)
    If 1/4000 cannot produce visible picture under bright sunlight then when can i use that shutter speed?

  5. #25

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by dotaboy View Post
    If 1/4000 cannot produce visible picture under bright sunlight then when can i use that shutter speed?
    When you are photographing bullets in flight.... Yes, you literally can stop a bullet at that shutter speed, provided you use high-powered strobes.
    Last edited by photobum; 9th January 2008 at 09:38 PM.

  6. #26
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    East
    Posts
    11,755

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by dotaboy View Post
    If 1/4000 cannot produce visible picture under bright sunlight then when can i use that shutter speed?
    Only in very bright lighting conditions and using a large aperture. Else you'd have to set to high ISO in bright light.
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  7. #27
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by dotaboy View Post
    If 1/4000 cannot produce visible picture under bright sunlight then when can i use that shutter speed?
    alamak, you still don't get it.

    if you shoot 1/4000s under bright sunlight, but using f22 at ISO 100, will still don't get a visible picture.

    exposure is make up by three factors, SHUTTER SPEED, APERTURE & ISO.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  8. #28
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodlands
    Posts
    291

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    When you are photographing bullets in flight.... Yes, you literally can stop a bullet at that shutter speed, provided you use high-powered strobes.
    so it just means 1/4000s won't produce any visible results for anyone under bright day light?
    Cause on many occasion i tried to shoot flowing stream at 1/4000 but it just turn out black.
    lowering the shutter gives visible results so i assume sensor is not faulty.

    To sammy:
    It's not that i'm lazy but i don't like sinking myself into books just to learn something which is Practical in nature.
    Like cameras and such,i love to fiddle and learn through trial and error.
    Sinking myself in book?not my style

  9. #29

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by dotaboy View Post
    so it just means 1/4000s won't produce any visible results for anyone under bright day light?
    Cause on many occasion i tried to shoot flowing stream at 1/4000 but it just turn out black.
    lowering the shutter gives visible results so i assume sensor is not faulty.
    First of all, you will need to get your fundamentals right. Try shooting at 1/250 at f8 at ISO 100 under bright daylight. You will get much better results.

  10. #30
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by dotaboy View Post
    so it just means 1/4000s won't produce any visible results for anyone under bright day light?
    Cause on many occasion i tried to shoot flowing stream at 1/4000 but it just turn out black.
    lowering the shutter gives visible results so i assume sensor is not faulty.

    To sammy:
    It's not that i'm lazy but i don't like sinking myself into books just to learn something which is Practical in nature.
    Like cameras and such,i love to fiddle and learn through trial and error.
    Sinking myself in book?not my style
    just lazy lar, books are written with theory plus past experience, why go and invent a TV, when you can just buy it from Harvey Norman?? lol

    those aunties also know shooting indoor must use flash.. they can tell you this is common sense some more.

    anyway, you are not the 1st one, last time also have one joker ask how come can not shoot 1/4000s in his room.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  11. #31

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    I'll shoot myself in the head inside my bedroom at 1/4,000, no.... at 1/12,500 (faster bullet speed means less blood splattering all over my clean and white walls), if he still don't understand this simple, yet important photography concept.
    Last edited by photobum; 9th January 2008 at 09:54 PM.

  12. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Clementi
    Posts
    10,596

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    After repeated posts by the experiences forummers, and a scolding, you still don't get it do you?

    Exposure is made up of three factors: shutter speed, aperture, and ISO.

    You need to be learning what happens to the picture when you adjust the values of these factors. Right now, you're not getting it, and obviously, your trial and error is not leading you to learn anything new, so IMHO picking up a book is still the best, most illustrated way to learn.

    FYI from practical experience, the only time I used 1/4000s shutter speed outdoors is on a really bright, hot day, with no cloud cover, f/2.8, ISO 200. Even then, I have found no need for using that fast a shutter speed. Most outdoor events that I've covered, I shoot on ISO 100, f/2.8 and a shutter speed of 1/400s or 1/500s only. This will easily freeze fast motion.

  13. #33
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodlands
    Posts
    291

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    just lazy lar, books are written with theory plus past experience, why go and invent a TV, when you can just buy it from Harvey Norman?? lol

    those aunties also know shooting indoor must use flash.. they can tell you this is common sense some more.

    anyway, you are not the 1st one, last time also have one joker ask how come can not shoot 1/4000s in his room.
    For me under afternoon sun also cannot shoot...

  14. #34

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by dotaboy View Post
    It's not that i'm lazy but i don't like sinking myself into books just to learn something which is Practical in nature.
    Like cameras and such,i love to fiddle and learn through trial and error.
    In another word - the "Just Do It!" attitude.

    Folks.... be very careful. You don't want him to become your army buddy. He will sabotage the entire platoon.

  15. #35
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodlands
    Posts
    291

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    In another word - the "Just Do It!" attitude.

    Folks.... be very careful. You don't want him to become your army buddy. He will sabotage the entire platoon.
    Nono,i hate army but once enlisted,i must become OCS to make full use of my 2 years!

  16. #36

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    FYI, I used to shoot NCAA College Basketball at 1/500 @ f2.8 at ISO 1600 under sodium vapor lamp. Freezing motion of basketball players slam dunk in mid-air.
    Last edited by photobum; 9th January 2008 at 10:04 PM.

  17. #37
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodlands
    Posts
    291

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    FYI, I used to shoot NCAA College basketball at 1/500 @ f2.8 at ISO 1600.
    anything till below 100s isn't an issue but i don't understand why under morning sun i don't get any visible pic at 1/4000.
    Apeture open very wide also dark pics...

  18. #38

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by dotaboy View Post
    anything till below 100s isn't an issue but i don't understand why under morning sun i don't get any visible pic at 1/4000.
    Apeture open very wide also dark pics...
    Because you don't need to shoot at 1/4000 in such lighting condition.

    I think I better go to my bedroom and shoot myself in the head now. I am about to throw up my entire spleen.
    Last edited by photobum; 9th January 2008 at 10:07 PM.

  19. #39
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodlands
    Posts
    291

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    Because you don't need to shoot at 1/4000 in such lighting condition.

    I think I better go to my bedroom and shoot myself in the head now. I am about to throw up my entire spleen.



    Then say impossible to achieve under normal condition.
    Cause i want to know why can't i acheive a visible shot under tha shutter speed.

  20. #40

    Default Re: Pictures turning dark at high shutter

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    Because you don't need to shoot at 1/4000 in such lighting condition.

    I think I better go to my bedroom and shoot myself in the head now. I am about to throw up my entire spleen.
    Ha Ha ha ha ha ha ha................................

    to TS.......... Die Die if you want to use 1/4000, You should buy the new NIKON D3 and shoot at ISO 12800... Your cam is not good enough..

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •