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Thread: Metering

  1. #1

    Default Metering

    I'm fairly new to photography thus trying to understand and grasp the understanding of metering.what im actually confused about is that under spot metering, how do we spot meter? do we just aim the point at the centre to the preferred source then lock the AE-L then compose and shoot or otherwise? im really confused between metering and focus. would really need some help. sorry.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Metering

    Quote Originally Posted by thane View Post
    I'm fairly new to photography thus trying to understand and grasp the understanding of metering.what im actually confused about is that under spot metering, how do we spot meter? do we just aim the point at the centre to the preferred source then lock the AE-L then compose and shoot or otherwise? im really confused between metering and focus. would really need some help. sorry.
    What you're asking also needs to factor in your shooting mode. If you're shooting in A (Av) or S (Tv) mode, then yes, you'd have to hold the AE-L button when you've captured the metering at the desired area. For M mode, it's easier, just dial in the figure you need according to your metered area and recompose your picture before shooting.
    Michael Lim
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Metering

    Quote Originally Posted by thane View Post
    I'm fairly new to photography thus trying to understand and grasp the understanding of metering.what im actually confused about is that under spot metering, how do we spot meter? do we just aim the point at the centre to the preferred source then lock the AE-L then compose and shoot or otherwise? im really confused between metering and focus. would really need some help. sorry.
    Metering is for getting the correct exposure by using a combination of the Aperture and Shutter speed. Focusing is to get the subject in Focus (sharp and not blur). When you use spot metering you are measuring the amount of light at a very small area % on the subject (% will depends on your make of camera) You are right about the locking of the AE-L then compose and shoot part. The camera always take the metering for the correct exposure using the the focusing point that you have selected to use, so without locking the AE the camera will gives you a different metering every time you recompose to take the shot. Try setting to the P mode and using the focusing point in the center. When you move this point around the room, you will notice the Aperture and Shutter Speed changes too. Now press the AE-L button and you will notice that the Aperture and Shutter Speed does not change any more. You will then proceed to use this center point to focus on your subject to achieve a sharp picture.

    Example for taking a Portrait shot; First, get the meter reading on the model face. Second, lock the exposure reading using the AE-L. Lastly focus on the eyes of the model face to get a sharp eyes on your picture. You can use any of the selected focusing point avaliable in the camera to achieve this. Hope this helps.
    Canon 30D, G11, 50 f1.8II, 10-22 f3.5-4.5, 24-70 f2.8L, 70-200 f2.8L IS, EX580II

  5. #5

    Default Re: Metering

    Quote Originally Posted by thane View Post
    I'm fairly new to photography thus trying to understand and grasp the understanding of metering.what im actually confused about is that under spot metering, how do we spot meter? do we just aim the point at the centre to the preferred source then lock the AE-L then compose and shoot or otherwise? im really confused between metering and focus. would really need some help. sorry.
    Metering is for getting the correct exposure by using a combination of the Aperture and Shutter speed. Focusing is to get the subject in Focus (sharp and not blur). Various metering mode is use to determine the size of the area in % to be measured. Spot metering = measuring a very small area in % on the subject, Evaluate = Average of the entire scene in the view finder, etc (% will depends on your make of camera) You are right about the locking of the AE-L then compose and shoot part. The camera always take the metering for the correct exposure using the the focusing point that you have selected to use, so without locking the AE the camera will gives you a different metering every time you recompose to take the shot. You can try this, set the camera in P mode and select the focusing point in the center. When you move this point around the room from bright to dim area, you will notice that the Aperture and Shutter Speed changes too. Now press the AE-L button and you will notice that the Aperture and Shutter Speed does not change any more. You will then proceed to compose your shot by using this center point to focus on your subject to achieve a sharp picture.

    Example for taking a Portrait shot; First, get the meter reading on the model face. Second, lock the exposure reading using the AE-L. Lastly focus on the eyes of the model face to get a sharp eyes on your picture, compose and take the shot. You can use any of the selected focusing point available in the camera to achieve this. Hope this helps.
    Last edited by airfins; 9th January 2008 at 08:25 AM.
    Canon 30D, G11, 50 f1.8II, 10-22 f3.5-4.5, 24-70 f2.8L, 70-200 f2.8L IS, EX580II

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