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Thread: Films recommendation

  1. #41
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    anyhow whack still sound so chim!

    and yeah i like the way film enhances the photos.. esp scenary & architecture.. which are two of my fave kind of photos to shoot

  2. #42
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by alternatve View Post
    For a stop bath, I just leave the film in water for 5 minutes. It does the trick, though I do shake it up a bit first. Stand developing is really seductive, esp the 1:100 dilution and the lack of agitation. But I guess the timing is rather hit and miss. I'll try to search it out on the net, or sacrifice a roll in the name of science.

    Incidently, I load 120 rolls as quick as lighting, but I got my first 35mm roll jammed 5 times. In the end, I got so fed up that I cut off the tip and tried again.

    I don't like digital photograhy because it's too predictable. It's fun to have the control and viewing the pictures quickly, but I feel that it cheapens the whole experience somewhat. I don't look at my digital shots at all, but I view my film shots now and then. Anyway, I think that you need the basics of photography. After that, you'll be free to use or break it as you will. What I can't stand is random no brain shots. Even the concept of lomography is better then that.

    Samuel
    what do u define as 'random no brain shots'? Cause to some, it may mean something when it perhaps seem like a no brain shot to you.

  3. #43

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by alternatve View Post
    For a stop bath, I just leave the film in water for 5 minutes. It does the trick, though I do shake it up a bit first. Stand developing is really seductive, esp the 1:100 dilution and the lack of agitation. But I guess the timing is rather hit and miss. I'll try to search it out on the net, or sacrifice a roll in the name of science.

    Incidently, I load 120 rolls as quick as lighting, but I got my first 35mm roll jammed 5 times. In the end, I got so fed up that I cut off the tip and tried again.

    I don't like digital photograhy because it's too predictable. It's fun to have the control and viewing the pictures quickly, but I feel that it cheapens the whole experience somewhat. I don't look at my digital shots at all, but I view my film shots now and then. Anyway, I think that you need the basics of photography. After that, you'll be free to use or break it as you will. What I can't stand is random no brain shots. Even the concept of lomography is better then that.

    Samuel
    Actually, it's not really 'stand developing'. It is just time and temperature adjusted. There is a formula and charts provided by Ilford to adjust time when going from 20 to 24 degrees and I extrapolated that to 28 degrees. HC-110 is also an extremely 'linear' developer, as you decrease the concentration (within reason, and within minimum limits) the time increases. So the formula reduces the time as I go up to 28 deg, then I adjust the dilution 1:100 and bring the times up again. Formulas work for Kodak film, Ilford film, probably most other film. I used to shoot a lot of Ilford stuff and particularly like Delta 400 (pulled to 200 in ID-11 or HC-110: superb!!), Delta 100, and FP4. Problem is all my timings for these are Dil H, 20C.

    The one thing I would not do is use a timing of 5 minutes or less with HC-110. I messed up one roll of 125PX this way (Dil B, 20degC).

    I computed 1:100 times based on my 1:63 Dilution H work and they seem to work very well, very consistent too. Of course that is, if you discount me deliberately messing things up for that extra unpredictability in my Holga shots but I am quite sure that with proper process control I can use these timings and achieve good results.

    I also found that agitation didn't make much of a difference, for some reason. I used to agitate every couple of minutes, then got lazy and didn't notice all that much difference, so I left it alone and now only stir once halfway through the run.

    Digital is great for the days when I need consistency, repeatability and 'one shot kills'. Events, once in a lifetime trips, yadda yadda - the stuff I will not have a chance to re-shoot.

    Quote Originally Posted by sheree View Post
    anyhow whack still sound so chim!

    and yeah i like the way film enhances the photos.. esp scenary & architecture.. which are two of my fave kind of photos to shoot
    Cool

    I took a look at your photoblog. Where did you shoot the kelong?
    Last edited by sloth; 12th January 2008 at 11:48 PM.

  4. #44
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by sloth View Post
    Digital is great for the days when I need consistency, repeatability and 'one shot kills'. Events, once in a lifetime trips, yadda yadda - the stuff I will not have a chance to re-shoot.


    I took a look at your photoblog. Where did you shoot the kelong?
    haha the kelong's at changi boardwalk(or is it broadwalk?). It's the part whereby u can watch sunsets.. and unfortunately it was drizzling on the day i went ): so cloudy so no sunset!

    And yes i agree about digital shots! With films, i do not dare to take more than once.. quite afraid i'd end up with two same photo.. waste money haha oops.

  5. #45

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by sheree View Post
    haha the kelong's at changi boardwalk(or is it broadwalk?). It's the part whereby u can watch sunsets.. and unfortunately it was drizzling on the day i went ): so cloudy so no sunset!

    And yes i agree about digital shots! With films, i do not dare to take more than once.. quite afraid i'd end up with two same photo.. waste money haha oops.
    Cool, I should head there some day. Always heard about it, never had an opportunity to visit it. You're right, it is boardwalk.

    Speaking of black and white (also note that you can get labs to do the developing for B&W if you don't want to DIY), I find B&W a great tool to deal with overcast gray skies. Like most other landscape shooters I love beautiful blue skies but we seldom get those.

    My problem with digital is that I tend to bracket A LOT whether or not I need it. I shoot a bit like the press photographers who will let go an entire 8.5fps barrage just to get the 'perfect' shot. Then I end up with way too many photos to delete later, headache With film I hardly ever bracket at all.

  6. #46
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by sloth View Post
    Cool, I should head there some day. Always heard about it, never had an opportunity to visit it. You're right, it is boardwalk.

    Speaking of black and white (also note that you can get labs to do the developing for B&W if you don't want to DIY), I find B&W a great tool to deal with overcast gray skies. Like most other landscape shooters I love beautiful blue skies but we seldom get those.

    My problem with digital is that I tend to bracket A LOT whether or not I need it. I shoot a bit like the press photographers who will let go an entire 8.5fps barrage just to get the 'perfect' shot. Then I end up with way too many photos to delete later, headache With film I hardly ever bracket at all.
    well.. it's quite a nice place but difficult to find. my friend & i went to the wrong place initially but thankfully ended up at the correct location after figuring out which bus to switch to.

    but one thing - don't go on rainy days. seriously. u'll end up like me.. mosquito bites after that. haha.

    Singapore doesn't really have pretty skies.. but i admit that my school area (buona vista) has pretty skies sometimes! but it's still rare though.. so rare that i'm often without a camera when i see such skies. That's probably why i took notice of architecture and stuff.. esp when sgp is a multi racial country.. so a lot of different 'flavoured' buildings to take. landscape wise.. not much. must go overseas i guess.

    haha i'm often too lazy to do bracketing even with dslr. oops.

  7. #47

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Lol. I don't bracket at all, period. Maybe it's because I'm not taking very important images and use too much film, so I don't see the point. I do compensate for the target that I am shooting though.

    One cheat for skies is to use filters, whether in person or digitally to add colour.

    Samuel
    f/8 and be there.

  8. #48
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by alternatve View Post
    Lol. I don't bracket at all, period. Maybe it's because I'm not taking very important images and use too much film, so I don't see the point. I do compensate for the target that I am shooting though.

    One cheat for skies is to use filters, whether in person or digitally to add colour.

    Samuel
    hahaha, well i guess most people wont do bracketing unless theyre using digital.

    hmm filters.. i havent got the chance to explore the use of filter even with my dslr. -shrugs. but sometimes i feel this digital or additional enhancement makes photos so artificially looking. Then again.. i guess this is also dependent on what u define as photography - as something that captures the exact memorable image, or to capture an image to bring out a certain feel (and thus needs enhancement to bring out this 'feel')

  9. #49

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by sheree View Post
    hahaha, well i guess most people wont do bracketing unless theyre using digital.

    hmm filters.. i havent got the chance to explore the use of filter even with my dslr. -shrugs. but sometimes i feel this digital or additional enhancement makes photos so artificially looking. Then again.. i guess this is also dependent on what u define as photography - as something that captures the exact memorable image, or to capture an image to bring out a certain feel (and thus needs enhancement to bring out this 'feel')
    With white balance, the main need of filters is removed. Actually, I don't use filters much myself, unless I'm doing B&W work. Then my multicoloured filters come out to play. Otherwise, it's just a polarzing filter. It's very useful, especially on bright days.

    I'm pretty much a heretic, taking from both sides what I like and mixing them together. I do some post enhancement on the computer, but it's mostly basic stuff on Picasa. To use more would be too time consuming and it wouldn't feel "right" to me anymore. I would rather walk for hours with a camera in hand then to sit in front of the computer editing photos. That's why I exchanged my D70 for a Bessa R2a.

    Anyway, I think we're getting real out of topic. I best stop now before the mods lock me away. It's been nice chatting with you sheree, and you too sloth. I've learnt a lot from you two.

    Samuel
    f/8 and be there.

  10. #50

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by sheree View Post
    hmm filters.. i havent got the chance to explore the use of filter even with my dslr. -shrugs. but sometimes i feel this digital or additional enhancement makes photos so artificially looking. Then again.. i guess this is also dependent on what u define as photography - as something that captures the exact memorable image, or to capture an image to bring out a certain feel (and thus needs enhancement to bring out this 'feel')
    Yup.. it's all about whether your intention is to capture or create something.

    The trick with postprocessing is also to know when to draw the line. I have had people tell me a given image needs processing, and then overdo it to the point where it looks awful. I tend to use a very light touch when postprocessing - less is more.

    Also, even with a digital, shooting it 'perfect' first time in camera (yes, it can be done) reduces the postprocessing workload later. I bracket to increase chances of getting the shot I want. The slide film shooters have been doing 'one shot one kill' for so many years - we can still do it too. (slide film is very unforgiving of exposure errors and permits less post-processing correction compared to negatives).

    Quote Originally Posted by alternatve View Post
    With white balance, the main need of filters is removed. Actually, I don't use filters much myself, unless I'm doing B&W work. Then my multicoloured filters come out to play. Otherwise, it's just a polarzing filter. It's very useful, especially on bright days.

    I'm pretty much a heretic, taking from both sides what I like and mixing them together. I do some post enhancement on the computer, but it's mostly basic stuff on Picasa. To use more would be too time consuming and it wouldn't feel "right" to me anymore. I would rather walk for hours with a camera in hand then to sit in front of the computer editing photos. That's why I exchanged my D70 for a Bessa R2a.

    Anyway, I think we're getting real out of topic. I best stop now before the mods lock me away. It's been nice chatting with you sheree, and you too sloth. I've learnt a lot from you two.

    Samuel
    It's been a pleasure talking to the two of you too, as well as the other contributors in this thread. Picked up some useful tips from them about where to get stuff too.

  11. #51

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Heya, been into film photography as my dad left behind a few cameras. Mainly using the Nikon FE2, but I've only tried Fuji Superia 400 and Kodak Gold 400.

    Recently bought a roll of Sensia 100, which I'm waiting for a bright sunny day to use.

    Anyway, do you know where are the places that stock a good range of film, such as the Fuji Pro 400H one of the posters mentioned, for sale?

    I'd really appreciate it. Thanks!

  12. #52

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by jonahsng View Post
    Heya, been into film photography as my dad left behind a few cameras. Mainly using the Nikon FE2, but I've only tried Fuji Superia 400 and Kodak Gold 400.

    Recently bought a roll of Sensia 100, which I'm waiting for a bright sunny day to use.

    Anyway, do you know where are the places that stock a good range of film, such as the Fuji Pro 400H one of the posters mentioned, for sale?

    I'd really appreciate it. Thanks!
    The pro films can generally be had at the 'pro' shops

    Konota at Peninsula, Cathay Photo at Peninsula, and Ruby Photo, next door Peninsula Hotel. All of them have quite a wide range of films, you should be able to find most of what you need. There are lower speed Fuji pro films as well if you are keen, such as 160S and 160C.

    Triple D (Burlington Square, first floor outside, near the road) has a bunch of Fuji Superia 100 for $1 right now.

    Sensia is a nice slide film. Try Provia 100F/400X, Velvia 50/100 as well.

    Also try black and white. Ruby sells a lot of black and white film. Ilford Delta 100/400, HP5, etc.

  13. #53

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Fuji Superia 100 for $1?! I need to get there man!

    Samuel
    f/8 and be there.

  14. #54

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by alternatve View Post
    Fuji Superia 100 for $1?! I need to get there man!

    Samuel
    There are just two catches......

    It's expired (though it seems to be fine, and alternative photographers would probably appreciate it).

    And it's a 12-shot roll though I got 13 shots out of my first one.

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