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Thread: Films recommendation

  1. #21

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Passed thru Peninsular area today buying Tri-X 120 for my Holga.

    Saw Sensia 100, 200 at Konota.

    Velvia 100, 100F and Provia 100F are 'evergreen' films that are always in stock everywhere because they are so popular. Provia is one of my favorites too, bit cheaper than Velvia.

    Ruby has Velvia 50, Provia 400X in addition to the above. Don't think they have Sensia.

    Oh, and there is one box of Fuji Superia Reala at Ruby in the fridge. ONE. Better call and 'chope' first. Don't blame me if someone has already bought it by the time you read this

    Also, Ruby is out of stock of Ilford films at the moment. If anybody else knows where to get Ilford, please feel free to mention. Thanks
    Last edited by sloth; 8th January 2008 at 10:43 PM.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Hey there!

    I have a vivitar uw&s too and I think you should try out Agfa Precisa! It gives a very nice blue-ish effect when you cross process it!

    One word of advice: ISO 100 might be a little too dim/underexposed for a vivitar camera. I've tried shooting with ISO 100 and some of my shots were a bit dark. You can try ISO 400 for best results because it's good for indoor and outdoor (but vivitar cameras don't work really good indoor because there's not enough light!) Hope that helps!

  3. #23

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    whether it's toy cameras or fully manual cameras, it helps to familiarise oneself with xposure values eg. sunny f/16 rule so that our pics will come out alright.

    www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    thanks guys for so much information! (:

    anyways.. hope u guys will answer my questions below! (:

    Quote Originally Posted by sheree View Post
    ooh okay!

    where is it ah? i saw tht its in anson road, international plaza. sounds familiar but im still quite clueless where. can tell me any other prominent buildings near there?

    same goes for miao laan.. is it near bukit batok mrt station?

  5. #25

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by sheree View Post
    thanks guys for so much information! (:

    anyways.. hope u guys will answer my questions below! (:
    Sorry, not familiar with those labs. But a quick search on Google is quite useful, turns up a lot of information about them.

    http://www.google.com.sg/search?q=mi...ient=firefox-a

    You can then follow up using the postcode on Streetdirectory.com, it will give you a map of the area to find your way there.


    I also picked up a couple of rolls of Agfa Precisa CT at Triple D since work took me to Sim Lim Square today. $8 per roll. Thanks to all those who recommended.

    They also have this basket of expired film for $1 each.. quick grab while you still can

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    oo okay thanks (:

    haha. due to sch and commitments, i guess the earliest i can have time to go buy my films are probably fri ): hopefully by then the films stay cheap and avail!

  7. #27

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    just dun be fooled there is two konota shops and they are both photo shops...
    the one in anson rd (international plaza) does not sell most of the films/slides they do however process you films.. go to the one at peninsular plaza they have alot of films/slides.. this shop also does processing of film.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    ooo okay! haha will check it out when im free & done with my 1st roll (haha i havent got the time to shoot :/ and trying to scrimp on my shots cus don wanna waste $)

  9. #29

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Shooting film isn't as expensive as you think, nor as time consuming, especially if you use C-41 process or do normal B&W processing youself. It costs $4 to develop a roll of C-41 which takes 30 minutes at my local lab. It costs $11 in total to D/o and scan your photos into a CD. If you have a film scanner, which I suggest you get if you use film often. B&W self development is even cheaper at roughly $2 per roll. You do have to buy the chemicals and equipment first though.

    Miao Lian is not located near the MRT, you have to walk further in. I'm not too sure about the lab, even though I live close because I prefer to go to Ruby/Konota for my film needs.

    Ilford is sold out? Thank goodness I stocked up on a few rolls on Ilford Pan 400 before they ran out. But I'm also happy that it's running out, because it shows that Singaporeans are still using film.

    Samuel
    f/8 and be there.

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by alternatve View Post
    Shooting film isn't as expensive as you think, nor as time consuming, especially if you use C-41 process or do normal B&W processing youself. It costs $4 to develop a roll of C-41 which takes 30 minutes at my local lab. It costs $11 in total to D/o and scan your photos into a CD. If you have a film scanner, which I suggest you get if you use film often. B&W self development is even cheaper at roughly $2 per roll. You do have to buy the chemicals and equipment first though.

    Miao Lian is not located near the MRT, you have to walk further in. I'm not too sure about the lab, even though I live close because I prefer to go to Ruby/Konota for my film needs.

    Ilford is sold out? Thank goodness I stocked up on a few rolls on Ilford Pan 400 before they ran out. But I'm also happy that it's running out, because it shows that Singaporeans are still using film.

    Samuel
    hmm. i saw some people listing miao laan as one of the developing place to go to.. & plus it's pretty near my sch, thought i might be able to go down have a look or smth

    how far away is it from mrt O_O
    haha sorry im quite clueless about the west of singapore despite studying in the west. =.=

  11. #31

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by alternatve View Post
    Shooting film isn't as expensive as you think, nor as time consuming, especially if you use C-41 process or do normal B&W processing youself. It costs $4 to develop a roll of C-41 which takes 30 minutes at my local lab. It costs $11 in total to D/o and scan your photos into a CD. If you have a film scanner, which I suggest you get if you use film often. B&W self development is even cheaper at roughly $2 per roll. You do have to buy the chemicals and equipment first though.

    Miao Lian is not located near the MRT, you have to walk further in. I'm not too sure about the lab, even though I live close because I prefer to go to Ruby/Konota for my film needs.

    Ilford is sold out? Thank goodness I stocked up on a few rolls on Ilford Pan 400 before they ran out. But I'm also happy that it's running out, because it shows that Singaporeans are still using film.

    Samuel

    Yes, some very good points - developing your own B&W can keep costs down.

    I learned to develop when I was stationed overseas.. their lab charged the equivalent of S$15 per roll of B&W as a result I 'made back' the cost of the tank and chemicals in 4 rolls.

    I brought the tank back (no chemicals, I think they would freak out) and bought new supplies at Ruby. My estimated cost at the dilution I use is literally 35 Singapore cents per roll + my time. "Time is valuable" true, and I understand that, but then again this is a hobby and it's part of the fun. If I really needed short turnaround time, you can't beat the 'instant' of digital.

    (my recipe: Kodak HC-110 developer diluted 1:100, and Ilford Rapid Fix that can be reused many times)

    Better buy and hoard Ilford but as you said it is a good thing since there is a demand and Ruby has incentive to indent stock. I want to see if Delta 400 can 'tahan' my developing technique (28degC water) and if so, I'm gonna buy a whole 100ft bulk roll. Bulk loading is another technique to keep your costs down although the savings is not THAT much (relatively). Works out to only be a few dollars. However bulk loading allows you to load as many frames as you want. If I want a roll with six frames or 40+ frames*, I can load it.

    (* 40+ frames may scratch the film. I actually succeeded in loading something like 48 frames into one can as an experiment, and I managed to shoot all of them)

    Developing film is not hard. See Streetshooter's excellent thread:
    http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=45612

    You can do MOST of the work in daylight. I don't even use a changing bag, I turn off my room lights and use an ordinary black garbage bag to load the film in!! Garbage bag is less than 10 cents.. that's why Once you load the film, you can turn the lights back on and take your time.

    I also learned that film is quite forgiving. I anyhow whack time and temperature and it still seems to come out somewhat OK.
    Last edited by sloth; 11th January 2008 at 10:12 PM.

  12. #32

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by sloth View Post
    Yes, some very good points - developing your own B&W can keep costs down.

    I learned to develop when I was stationed overseas.. their lab charged the equivalent of S$15 per roll of B&W as a result I 'made back' the cost of the tank and chemicals in 4 rolls.

    I brought the tank back (no chemicals, I think they would freak out) and bought new supplies at Ruby. My estimated cost at the dilution I use is literally 35 Singapore cents per roll + my time. "Time is valuable" true, and I understand that, but then again this is a hobby and it's part of the fun. If I really needed short turnaround time, you can't beat the 'instant' of digital.

    (my recipe: Kodak HC-110 developer diluted 1:100, and Ilford Rapid Fix that can be reused many times)

    Better buy and hoard Ilford but as you said it is a good thing since there is a demand and Ruby has incentive to indent stock. I want to see if Delta 400 can 'tahan' my developing technique (28degC water) and if so, I'm gonna buy a whole 100ft bulk roll. Bulk loading is another technique to keep your costs down although the savings is not THAT much (relatively). Works out to only be a few dollars. However bulk loading allows you to load as many frames as you want. If I want a roll with six frames or 40+ frames*, I can load it.

    (* 40+ frames may scratch the film. I actually succeeded in loading something like 48 frames into one can as an experiment, and I managed to shoot all of them)

    Developing film is not hard. See Streetshooter's excellent thread:
    http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=45612

    You can do MOST of the work in daylight. I don't even use a changing bag, I turn off my room lights and use an ordinary black garbage bag to load the film in!! Garbage bag is less than 10 cents.. that's why Once you load the film, you can turn the lights back on and take your time.

    I also learned that film is quite forgiving. I anyhow whack time and temperature and it still seems to come out somewhat OK.
    Sloth, your 1:100 method, is that stand development? I use Kodak HC-110 as well, but I use the manufacturer's recommended dilusion, which I think is rather wasteful. I have heard you can use 1:100 dilusion and vary the time and agitation to get the same effect. Any help is appreciated. I have a alcohol thermometer that I never used because I'm too lazy to mess around with ice cubes and the thermometer isn't reactive enough to help, so I just use normal tap water. YOu do have to note whether the water is unusually cold or warm though.

    I usually use Pan 400, but I love HP5+. However, at $6.50 a pop, it's too expensive for me. Bulk rolling isn't really needed in Singapore as film prices are cheap compared to other places in the world like Australia. You only save $0.50-$1 and I know people like me will get dust all over the canister and loader and scratch 36 exposures.

    Sheree, I'm sorry for hijacking your thread with my questions, but I hope that it would be useful to you as well. Miao Laan address can be found here: http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=144837 and if you're lazy, http://www.streetdirectory.com/asia_...l_site_116887/. It's close to Milliena Institute and the former Commonwealth Secondary School, currently River Valley High campus. I hope this is useful for you.

    Samuel

    PS: I couldn't help but notice that you're from ACJC? I used to study at Fairfield Methodist Secondary School, the secondary school right next to it. I'm currently studying at SP, also pretty close. Singapore is a small place indeed.
    f/8 and be there.

  13. #33

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by alternatve View Post
    Sloth, your 1:100 method, is that stand development? I use Kodak HC-110 as well, but I use the manufacturer's recommended dilusion, which I think is rather wasteful. I have heard you can use 1:100 dilusion and vary the time and agitation to get the same effect. Any help is appreciated. I have a alcohol thermometer that I never used because I'm too lazy to mess around with ice cubes and the thermometer isn't reactive enough to help, so I just use normal tap water. YOu do have to note whether the water is unusually cold or warm though.

    I usually use Pan 400, but I love HP5+. However, at $6.50 a pop, it's too expensive for me. Bulk rolling isn't really needed in Singapore as film prices are cheap compared to other places in the world like Australia. You only save $0.50-$1 and I know people like me will get dust all over the canister and loader and scratch 36 exposures.

    Sheree, I'm sorry for hijacking your thread with my questions, but I hope that it would be useful to you as well. Miao Laan address can be found here: http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=144837 and if you're lazy, http://www.streetdirectory.com/asia_...l_site_116887/. It's close to Milliena Institute and the former Commonwealth Secondary School, currently River Valley High campus. I hope this is useful for you.

    Samuel

    PS: I couldn't help but notice that you're from ACJC? I used to study at Fairfield Methodist Secondary School, the secondary school right next to it. I'm currently studying at SP, also pretty close. Singapore is a small place indeed.
    Hope this info helps her as well - I can still remember my student days (which were really not so long ago) when every dollar counted. B&W has a certain charm about it that is not the same as grayscale conversion from digital. And it really goes easy on the pocket.

    True 'stand development' involves letting it sit throughout. My methods tend to break all the rules and throw out the whole book what I usually do is stir using the little stick for about 15 seconds at start of development, then once in the middle if I remember. IF. Because I am usually somewhere else doing something at the same time

    SG water is never really that cold. I have developed in temps ranging from 12 deg to 28. 12 really feels like your fingers are gonna freeze off. You aren't gonna encounter that here, I can tell you that!

    A couple of starter guidelines - Kodak Plus-X 125, cook for 9 minutes using 1:100 and my method of stir once at start, once in the middle. Kodak Tri-X 400, 10-11 minutes.

    As you accumulate expertise you'll learn that film has a lot of tolerance, and that you can develop for a bit more or a bit less and not suffer too badly. Also note that I do not print from negatives the traditional way: I scan everything since I simply do not have enough space for paper trays and an enlarger. Printing is the resource-intensive part: development is the easy one and doesn't take up much space.

    I have a Canon 8600F scanner because I need to handle medium format. If you can get by with just 35mm you can pick up a $210-$250 Canon which is substantially cheaper than getting the lab to scan for you. I have tried a number of labs, the big surprise is that I get less grain and better results with my own scanner..

  14. #34
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by alternatve View Post
    Sloth, your 1:100 method, is that stand development? I use Kodak HC-110 as well, but I use the manufacturer's recommended dilusion, which I think is rather wasteful. I have heard you can use 1:100 dilusion and vary the time and agitation to get the same effect. Any help is appreciated. I have a alcohol thermometer that I never used because I'm too lazy to mess around with ice cubes and the thermometer isn't reactive enough to help, so I just use normal tap water. YOu do have to note whether the water is unusually cold or warm though.

    I usually use Pan 400, but I love HP5+. However, at $6.50 a pop, it's too expensive for me. Bulk rolling isn't really needed in Singapore as film prices are cheap compared to other places in the world like Australia. You only save $0.50-$1 and I know people like me will get dust all over the canister and loader and scratch 36 exposures.

    Sheree, I'm sorry for hijacking your thread with my questions, but I hope that it would be useful to you as well. Miao Laan address can be found here: http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=144837 and if you're lazy, http://www.streetdirectory.com/asia_...l_site_116887/. It's close to Milliena Institute and the former Commonwealth Secondary School, currently River Valley High campus. I hope this is useful for you.

    Samuel

    PS: I couldn't help but notice that you're from ACJC? I used to study at Fairfield Methodist Secondary School, the secondary school right next to it. I'm currently studying at SP, also pretty close. Singapore is a small place indeed.
    no worries, i'm also learning while u raise your questions! Although i think it may take sometime before I would willingly learn to develop the photos myself (though i know the advantages) since i'm not a frequent film snapper.

    And yes, that serves me a lot of help! (: got to check it out someday if i get to go home before the skies get dark =.=

    and yeah i'm in acjc, but im not in any photog soc or smth, so gotta learn all these photography stuff on my own via reading tutorials etc.. haha. if im not wrong, SP's havin open house eh? (kinda out of topic but nvm. )

  15. #35

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by sheree View Post
    no worries, i'm also learning while u raise your questions! Although i think it may take sometime before I would willingly learn to develop the photos myself (though i know the advantages) since i'm not a frequent film snapper.

    And yes, that serves me a lot of help! (: got to check it out someday if i get to go home before the skies get dark =.=

    and yeah i'm in acjc, but im not in any photog soc or smth, so gotta learn all these photography stuff on my own via reading tutorials etc.. haha. if im not wrong, SP's havin open house eh? (kinda out of topic but nvm. )
    You don't really need to join a group to learn. If you can learn how to teach yourself, you're set for life. And if you teach yourself you tend to develop a deeper understanding. So don't worry about doing it on your own

    No need to rush into film developing.. it is a long journey, but enjoy the journey and the adventure, it is part of the fun oh - and post some of your photos when you develop the roll!
    Last edited by sloth; 12th January 2008 at 12:08 PM.

  16. #36

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by sheree View Post
    no worries, i'm also learning while u raise your questions! Although i think it may take sometime before I would willingly learn to develop the photos myself (though i know the advantages) since i'm not a frequent film snapper.

    And yes, that serves me a lot of help! (: got to check it out someday if i get to go home before the skies get dark =.=

    and yeah i'm in acjc, but im not in any photog soc or smth, so gotta learn all these photography stuff on my own via reading tutorials etc.. haha. if im not wrong, SP's havin open house eh? (kinda out of topic but nvm. )
    Yea, it is. Now, when I want to transist from lecture to lecture, do projects and study, I have to deal with hordes of secondary school kids wandering around looking here and there.

    I assure you that self processing isn't a chore, but more of a labour of love. It's just so cool to see your shots all washed and developed and knowing that you did it all the way. I don't print myself either, because my parents mind losing a bathroom for my hobby, so I simply scan and edit using PS.

    I didn't join the SP photographers either, because I'm not a mainstream shooter, rather I use weird cameras with film (OMG!) so I don't think I can learn much either. All I've learnt came out from a book, experiments and learning from seniors in this forum and in person.

    Sloth, thanks for your help. Unfortunately, I use Ilford B&W films, so the two timings are out. I've found a dilusion that allows me to maximise my HC-110, dilution H, so I'm pretty much set. My friends and I have tried crazy stuff like developing C-41 film in B&W chemicals and getting useable pictures! The film is now B&W though.

    Samuel
    f/8 and be there.

  17. #37

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by alternatve View Post
    Yea, it is. Now, when I want to transist from lecture to lecture, do projects and study, I have to deal with hordes of secondary school kids wandering around looking here and there.

    I assure you that self processing isn't a chore, but more of a labour of love. It's just so cool to see your shots all washed and developed and knowing that you did it all the way. I don't print myself either, because my parents mind losing a bathroom for my hobby, so I simply scan and edit using PS.

    I didn't join the SP photographers either, because I'm not a mainstream shooter, rather I use weird cameras with film (OMG!) so I don't think I can learn much either. All I've learnt came out from a book, experiments and learning from seniors in this forum and in person.

    Sloth, thanks for your help. Unfortunately, I use Ilford B&W films, so the two timings are out. I've found a dilusion that allows me to maximise my HC-110, dilution H, so I'm pretty much set. My friends and I have tried crazy stuff like developing C-41 film in B&W chemicals and getting useable pictures! The film is now B&W though.

    Samuel
    That having been said some days it is frustrating.. I had to RAM a 120 onto the reel because it just refused to go. Bet there is some damage to it. Then again 120 is considerably harder to load than 35mm.. 35mm is so easy I could do it while almost asleep. I always kena one uncooperative roll now and then. But don't let that deter you or scare you.. I guess it is just one more obstacle to overcome. And as I said 35mm does not have this problem unless your reels are damp.

    Load-in is the hardest part because you have to do that in the dark. Everything else is just mixing and stirring. If you can stir kopi you sure can do. And the feeling of fishing your film out of the tank and seeing the results is SHIOK.

    Most photo clubs are digital nowadays and probably for a good reason - film is costly especially on limited budgets. The best way to learn is by doing - even if it hard some days.

    I used to use Dil H as well, but switched to 1:100 because it caters to local temperature better. No chilled water for me, can't be bothered. Not so much to save developer but rather to make it more high-temp-friendly. I have one roll of Fuji Superia 100 (the $1 Triple D roll) I want to try in B&W. I might be able to provide you with Ilford temps and timings when I get my stock from Ruby next week. No turning back for me now: I just bought a Pentax 645 so medium format all the way. Though really some days I am tempted to just buy BW400CN and get the lab to do it.... although if I really felt lazy I'd just go shoot digital and get my instant "I want it NOW" results.

    Will post my SG temperature timings here:
    http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=339825

    Oh, and one tip for darkroom users: the very strong smell comes from the acetic acid (vinegar) stop bath they use. I made my own out of white vinegar and wah piang, the smell...

    Anyway, the only reason I did that was to compare an acid stop vs a rinse stop. You don't even need to use a stop bath nowadays - you just rinse in water 3 times (Ilford method). So eliminating the vinegar stops the vast majority of the smell. If you absolutely must use a stop bath, use a citric acid stop (odorless stop bath).

    PS: No difference between my acid stop vs water stop development results.
    Last edited by sloth; 12th January 2008 at 10:23 PM.

  18. #38
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    Default Re: Films recommendation

    All those developing stuff somehow sounds so complicated -_-

    haha for now i'm kinda sick of digital photography (or maybe cus i cant think of better place to shoot in Singapore, or be bothered to carry my heavy dslr around ): or to buy another lens for my dslr =.=). Am just attempting to play around with films for now (but im just afraid of causing a hole in my pocket cus the films themselves are rather expensive!). haha just an obsession with toy cameras now.. though it doesnt really produce quality photos =d

    eh am i making sense in what i typed? =.= haha sorry if i dont cus im super tired now =.=

  19. #39

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by sheree View Post
    All those developing stuff somehow sounds so complicated -_-

    haha for now i'm kinda sick of digital photography (or maybe cus i cant think of better place to shoot in Singapore, or be bothered to carry my heavy dslr around ): or to buy another lens for my dslr =.=). Am just attempting to play around with films for now (but im just afraid of causing a hole in my pocket cus the films themselves are rather expensive!). haha just an obsession with toy cameras now.. though it doesnt really produce quality photos =d

    eh am i making sense in what i typed? =.= haha sorry if i dont cus im super tired now =.=
    Well you do get tired of the same old thing, I too have shot my fair share of digital. Film adds an unusual 'look and feel' to the same old places.

    Not every shot needs to be perfect

    As for developing.. photography can be a technical discipline if you want it to be, or not... really the way I develop is considered very 'anyhow whack'

  20. #40

    Default Re: Films recommendation

    For a stop bath, I just leave the film in water for 5 minutes. It does the trick, though I do shake it up a bit first. Stand developing is really seductive, esp the 1:100 dilution and the lack of agitation. But I guess the timing is rather hit and miss. I'll try to search it out on the net, or sacrifice a roll in the name of science.

    Incidently, I load 120 rolls as quick as lighting, but I got my first 35mm roll jammed 5 times. In the end, I got so fed up that I cut off the tip and tried again.

    I don't like digital photograhy because it's too predictable. It's fun to have the control and viewing the pictures quickly, but I feel that it cheapens the whole experience somewhat. I don't look at my digital shots at all, but I view my film shots now and then. Anyway, I think that you need the basics of photography. After that, you'll be free to use or break it as you will. What I can't stand is random no brain shots. Even the concept of lomography is better then that.

    Samuel
    f/8 and be there.

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