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Thread: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

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    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Clinton, Obama vow to bury race debate
    By NEDRA PICKLER and DAVID ESPO, Associated Press Writers
    22 minutes ago

    LAS VEGAS - Democratic presidential rivals Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama blamed aides and campaign surrogates Tuesday night for fueling a campaign controversy over race, jointly pledging at a debate on Martin Luther King's birthday to put the matter behind them.


    Obama said "not only in hindsight, but going forward," he regretted that his staff had prodded reporters to pursue the issue.

    "Our supporters, our staff, get overzealous. They start saying things that I would not say," said Obama, the most viable black candidate in history.

    "We both have exuberant and sometimes uncontrollable supporters," Clinton said in the opening moments of a two-hour debate televised on MSNBC. "We need to get this campaign where it should be," said the former first lady, seeking to become the first woman to occupy the White House.

    She said comments by black businessman Robert Johnson over the weekend were inappropriate, but sidestepped when asked whether she would bar him from playing a role in her campaign. Johnson made an evident reference to Obama's youthful drug use although he denied that was his intent.

    Clinton, Obama and former Sen. John Edwards sat down for their debate as the former first lady won a meaningless Michigan presidential primary, a contest held in violation of party rules.

    Edwards occupied the third chair at the debate, the only white man among three rivals.

    The first hour of the debate was surprisingly cordial, particularly given the controversy of the past few days and the wide-open nature of their race for the presidential nomination.

    At the same time, there were limits to the comraderie.

    Clinton, asked whether Edwards and Obama were prepared to sit in the White House, said "that's what the voters have to decide."

    And Edwards, given a chance to question his rivals, pointed out the huge sums that Clinton and Obama both have raised from drug and insurance companies. "Do you think these people expect something or are they just interested in good government?" he asked.

    Obama quickly replied that he did not accept donations from federal lobbyists or political action committees, and Edwards just as quickly pointed out that applied to him as well.

    The Michigan primary was an election in name only, where Clinton was the only major candidate entered. She faced competition principally from the "uncommitted" line on the ballot, an option that some supporters of Edwards and Obama advocated to embarrass the former first lady.

    Returns from 55 percent of the state's precincts showed her with 58 percent of the vote, and uncommitted gaining about 37 percent.

    The debate was held four days before Saturday's caucuses in Nevada, the next official event in a wide open race for the party's presidential nomination.

    Obama won the leadoff Iowa caucuses less than two weeks ago, but Clinton rebounded with an upset victory in the New Hampshire primary. Edwards has yet to win a contest.

    Pre-caucus polls in Nevada make it a close race among the three, an event spiced by a lawsuit filed by several Clinton supporters hoping to challenge the ground rules.

    Their objective was to prevent several caucuses along the Las Vegas Strip, where thousands of Culinary Workers Union employees many of them Hispanic or black hold jobs.

    The rules were approved in May, when Clinton was the overwhelming national front-runner in the race. But the union voted to endorse Obama last week, and the lawsuit followed.

    MSNBC televised the debate from the Cashman Center. Brian Williams and Tim Russert of NBC were the moderators.

    Ohio Rep. Dennis Kucinich had hoped to have a seat at the table, but the Nevada Supreme Court ruled shortly before the debate began that MSNBC was legally entitled to prevent him from participating. It promptly did.

    The Michigan primary was the first of two Democratic contests in which the DNC penalized state officials. Early voting began Monday for the Jan. 29 Florida primary, where Obama's name is on the ballot but no campaigning is expected.

    The disputes arose because national party officials wanted to allow only four states, Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina, to hold their contests before Feb. 5.

    ___

    Associated Press writer David Espo reported from Washington.

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    McCain vows he'll win in South Carolina
    By LIZ SIDOTI, Associated Press Writer
    11 minutes ago

    CHARLESTON, S.C. - Republican presidential candidate John McCain said on Thursday that despite his second-place finish in Michigan's GOP primary he intends to win this state's first-in-the-South contest. The Arizona senator told supporters he would prevail in the state that eight years ago derailed his candidacy.

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    "Tonight, my friends, we congratulate another candidate's campaign but tomorrow we get up and fight," said the Arizona senator, who flew here late Tuesday evening to await the Michigan returns.

    After a victory in last week's New Hampshire primary, McCain had led in national polls. But the Michigan victory for former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney further scrambled the dynamics.

    McCain got 30 percent of the vote, to 39 percent for Romney.

    Earlier, McCain told The Associated Press he had just talked to Romney to congratulate him on his victory. "Starting tomorrow, we're going to win South Carolina, and we're going to go on and win the nomination," he said.

    "I congratulate him on that Michigan welcomed their native son with their support," McCain added. Romney was raised in Michigan and his father, George Romney, was governor and a 1968 presidential contender.

    "I said we would win in New Hampshire. We will win in South Carolina," McCain said.

    Asked to respond to Romney's comments that his win was "a victory of optimism over Washington-style pessimism," the four-term senator passed on commenting, saying, "I would not know what he's talking about."

    In his session with supporters, McCain said, "For a minute there in New Hampshire, I thought this campaign might be getting easier. But you know what? We've gotten pretty good at doing things the hard way too. I think we've shown them we don't mind a fight."

    "We're going to fight for your votes, we're going to win this primary and the nomination of our party and we're going to be proud of the way we do it," he said.

    After campaigning intensely in Michigan, McCain quickly shifted his attention to South Carolina. He'll spend the next four days campaigning here.

    McCain is hopeful for a strong showing in South Carolina, where his military background should provide a big help, and he needs to show that he's competitive in the South.

    But South Carolina has been a disappointment for him in the past. In 2000, he won the New Hampshire primary only to see his campaign run into a wall in South Carolina, where George W. Bush emerged victorious and went on to wrap up the GOP nomination.

    Also, among his rivals this time are two southerners former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and former Tennessee Sen. Fred Thompson who are mounting strong challenges.

    McCain, who is leading in national polls, won the Michigan primary eight years ago on the strength of independent and Democratic-crossover voters.

    McCain began running an ad in the state Tuesday involving his longtime public service. Though he did not mention it, his more than five years spent as a prisoner of war in Vietnam are well known and give him significant stature among active and retired members of the military. About 413,000 veterans are estimated to be living in South Carolina and hundreds more residents are among the military's active duty and reserves. The state also is in the midst of its largest, single-unit deployment of National Guard troops since World War II.

    ___

    Editors's Note: Sidoti reported from Washington, D.C

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    d race on d GOP side is definetly getting more and more complicated. whiles d dems now focused on SC and Nevada Edwards needs a convincing win. as for that, go obama!
    IF

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by emirates View Post
    every president at the least has 4yrs or the most 10yrs according to the constitution. time for foreign policy is limited. and it really depends on the president's interest on the world and its effects on the nation.
    They have a total of two 4 year terms total. We'll see if Pres. Bush steps down at the end of his final term.

    The point is that the U.S.A. needs presidents who are willing to open up the country. Bill Clinton was doing that but he was just a first step. After he finished, Pres. Bush just re-wrote history and took back any gains the country had made.

    The Republicans generally don't want progress. Ronald Reagan was probably the most forward-thinking of the Republicans, ever. Pres. Bush seems more inclined to help his friends' businesses at the expense of lives and jobs for the middle and lower classes.

    Most of the candidates don't even seem useful to me. I just hope that the country doesn't end up with another 8 years like these have been--down the toilet.

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    [QUOTE=bousozoku;3709023]They have a total of two 4 year terms total. We'll see if Pres. Bush steps down at the end of his final term.

    The point is that the U.S.A. needs presidents who are willing to open up the country. Bill Clinton was doing that but he was just a first step. After he finished, Pres. Bush just re-wrote history and took back any gains the country had made.

    The Republicans generally don't want progress. Ronald Reagan was probably the most forward-thinking of the Republicans, ever. Pres. Bush seems more inclined to help his friends' businesses at the expense of lives and jobs for the middle and lower classes.

    Most of the candidates don't even seem useful to me. I just hope that the country doesn't end up with another 8 years like these have been--down the toilet.[/QUOTE

    u r rite bout Ronald R. he really did alot during his stay in the white house. just too bad there r few like him. Bush seems too pressured bout the war and the press have been really hard on him, but as the Rights of America states: "the right to free speech and press" wrong impression and other stuff can hardly be controlled. like u said they put up or poits probly true a 'down in the toilet' past 8 yrs under the Bush administration.
    IF

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    sad,sad another chance Clinton win. Nevada down now to the South
    IF

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    US campaign broadens after Obama's South Carolina win
    Posted: 28 January 2008 0747 hrs

    MACON, Georgia : White House hopeful Barack Obama took his message of unity on the road Sunday one day after trouncing rival Hillary Clinton in a race-tinged battle in South Carolina's Democratic primary.

    The African-American senator from Illinois said his two-to-one margin over Clinton in Saturday's contest in the heavily black southern state demonstrated that Americans want to transcend racial and partisan divisions.

    "I think people want change. I think they want to get beyond some of the racial politics that, you know, has been so dominant in the past," he said on ABC television.

    After a tense battle splashed with accusations of "race-baiting," Obama -- who seeks to become the country's first-ever black president -- swept the field with 55 percent of the vote against Clinton's 27 percent and ex-senator John Edwards' 18 percent.

    New York Senator Clinton meanwhile defended her husband Bill, whose avid campaigning was blamed for racial polarization and, in some post-vote analyses, for her poor showing.

    "Maybe he got a little carried away. You know, that comes with a hard-fought election," Clinton said of the former president.

    "It also comes with sleep deprivation which, you know, I think is marking all of us, our families, our supporters," she told CBS.

    Although exit polls showed a clear slant among white voters for Clinton and Edwards, Obama said his victory showed that people rejected the nasty politics of the 1990s, when Bill Clinton was president.

    "I do think that there is a certain brand of politics that we've become accustomed to ... where we basically think anything is fair game," Obama said.

    "There is no doubt that I think that in the '90s, we got caught up in a slash and burn politics that the American people are weary of."

    Obama's remarks came as the close-fought campaign looked toward the vast "Super Tuesday" vote of February 5, when more than 20 states vote in both Democratic and Republican primaries, and which could determine the candidates for the November 4 presidential election.

    While Obama was in Georgia Sunday, Clinton moved to Tennessee where she addressed a black church congregation. Both have two state nominating contests under their belts, all in states with small numbers of delegates to the party's Denver national nominating convention.

    Clinton Sunday highlighted the next stage of the battle while playing down her South Carolina defeat.

    "What I'm focused on is, now we're moving forward. We have these 22 states ahead of us" on February 5, when delegate-rich California, New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts are up for grabs. All four are leaning toward Clinton, according to polls.

    She also said Bill Clinton would continue to campaign for her, despite criticisms from prominent party members that he was going too far in personal attacks in the race.

    "He is going to continue to be with me and support me and speak out for me," Clinton said.

    Meanwhile US media reported that on Monday Obama will pick up the endorsement of Senator Ted Kennedy, doyen of the Democrats' liberal wing -- following another nod from Kennedy's niece Carolina Kennedy, who compared Obama to her father president John F. Kennedy.

    "Sometimes it takes a while to recognize that someone has a special ability to get us to believe in ourselves ... and imagine that together we can do great things," Caroline Kennedy wrote of Obama in Sunday's New York Times, under the headline "A President Like my Father."

    In the race for the Republican nomination tensions rose ahead of the Florida's primary Tuesday, in which Senator John McCain is closely matched with former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney.

    Romney lashed out Sunday over McCain's accusation that he had advocated a pullout from Iraq "similar to what the Democrats are seeking, which would have led to the victory by Al-Qaeda."

    "Everybody who's looked at what he said has found it to be completely misleading and inaccurate. It's dishonest," said Romney, seeking to burnish his national security credentials in front of Florida's conservatives.

    McCain got a major boost with the endorsement of Florida's popular Governor Charlie Crist, while Romney picked up the backing Sunday of diplomat Liz Cheney, the daughter of Vice President Dick Cheney and a top official in the campaign of Fred Thompson until he dropped out of the Republican race this week.

    Meanwhile Rudy Giuliani, the former national Republican frontrunner who has pinned his campaign on a Florida victory, saw his hopes sink further when a new poll showed him running fourth in the state.

    The Zogby poll Sunday put McCain and Romney tied at 30 percent, Mike Huckabee at 14 percent and Giuliani at 13 percent.

    - AFP/ir

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    The Republicans have been all over this area (Central Floriduh) since the past week. Apparently, they've been particularly annoying over the phone also. The primary vote is tomorrow, since it's not Tuesday here yet, and this will all be over until November.

    Rudy Giuliani should drop out on Wednesday.

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by bousozoku View Post
    The Republicans have been all over this area (Central Floriduh) since the past week. Apparently, they've been particularly annoying over the phone also. The primary vote is tomorrow, since it's not Tuesday here yet, and this will all be over until November.

    Rudy Giuliani should drop out on Wednesday.
    ya he ain't doing to well.
    IF

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Republican McCain wins Florida primary
    Posted: 30 January 2008 1020 hrs

    MIAMI : Republican hopeful John McCain won a narrow victory over rival Mitt Romney in Florida's primaries Tuesday, delivering a body blow to the White House hopes of ex-New York mayor Rudolph Giuliani.

    With 62 percent of precincts reporting, US media networks called the Florida race for McCain, giving the respected Arizona senator some 36 percent of the vote over former Massachusetts governor Romney on 32 percent.

    Giuliani, who has staked his whole campaign on a high-risk strategy of winning in Florida, was on 15 percent in third place, just ahead of ordained Baptist preacher Mike Huckabee on 13 percent.

    McCain, a Vietnam war veteran, stomped to victory in the crucial state, pushing to the front of the pack in the race for the Republican party's nomination for the November presidential elections.

    It was a tight race, which saw the two men trade daily attacks.

    McCain highlighted his military credentials in this state which is a demographic microcosm of the United States, with a high population of veterans.

    "I am the best equipped with the knowledge, experience, background and judgment to lead this nation against radical Islamic extremism," he told the Fox News network.

    Just a few months ago McCain had been all but written off, after a lack of funds forced him to strip down his campaign and shed staff.

    Now he has now notched up three major wins after taking New Hampshire and South Carolina with Romney having romped home in Michigan and Nevada.

    On the Democratic side, New York senator and former first lady Hillary Clinton cruised to victory in the state over her bitter rival, Illinois Senator Barack Obama, who already has South Carolina and Iowa to his credit.

    But the victory was merely symbolic as Florida has been penalised for bringing forward its primaries, and stripped of all its delegates to the Democratic national convention which will choose the party's candidate.

    Turnout was higher than expected though, with more than a million people believed to have voted on the Democratic side.

    The Clinton campaign is now pushing for the August convention to restore the delegates from both Florida and Michigan, also won by the former first lady alongside her earlier victories in New Hampshire and Nevada.

    McCain's win in Florida gives him a high-energy boost as the 2008 White House race sweeps forward to next week and Super Tuesday when some 22 states will vote for their candidates.

    The 71-year-old senator, who saw his presidential hopes crushed by George W. Bush in 2000, has been touted as the Republican's come-back candidate after lack of money forced him to scale back his campaign last summer.

    But the big question now remains, the fate of Giuliani.

    The former mayor who steered New York through the trauma of the September 11, 2001 attacks staked his whole campaign on winning in Florida, after largely ignoring the earlier primaries.

    He has steadfastly refused to say what he would do if he lost badly here, but his poor performance on Tuesday raises speculation about his viability in the tight race.

    Obama's campaign meanwhile were playing down Clinton's win here, after the young Illinois senator routed the former first lady in Saturday's South Carolina vote beating her by 55 percent to 27 percent of the vote.

    "Our focus is on February 5. Honestly if she's spending a night in Florida instead of a February 5 state, that's just fine with us," said Obama campaign manager David Plouffe earlier.

    Both Clinton and McCain were Tuesday leading opinion poll in delegate-rich California, one of the Super Tuesday states.

    The former first lady held a 49 percent to 32 percent lead over Obama in a Los Angeles Times/CNN/Politico poll.

    McCain surged to a double-digit lead, with 39 percent of likely Republican primary participants expressing support for the Arizona senator compared to 26 percent for Romney. - AFP/ch

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Rudy had a bad day....probly he and Edwards my call it off soon. Maybe after Super Tuesday.
    the race is gettin heated espacially in the Democratic side.
    "the time for change has come" indeed it has!!!!
    IF

  12. #52

    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Edwards and Rudy are out!

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by emirates View Post
    Rudy had a bad day....probly he and Edwards my call it off soon. Maybe after Super Tuesday.
    the race is gettin heated espacially in the Democratic side.
    "the time for change has come" indeed it has!!!!
    The funny thing is that, even though Giuliani did poorly, Huckabee did worse in a state where there are many, many, many Christian fundamentalists, which is his base group. Neither of those two would help the U.S.A. anyway.

    Too bad about Edwards but he'd still be in the running for vice-president since Clinton and Obama probably won't side with each other once the primaries are finished.

  14. #54

    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    If Obama become President then the TV series "24 Hour" Season 1 story line might become true
    Canon 30D, G11, 50 f1.8II, 10-22 f3.5-4.5, 24-70 f2.8L, 70-200 f2.8L IS, EX580II

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by bousozoku View Post
    The funny thing is that, even though Giuliani did poorly, Huckabee did worse in a state where there are many, many, many Christian fundamentalists, which is his base group. Neither of those two would help the U.S.A. anyway.

    Too bad about Edwards but he'd still be in the running for vice-president since Clinton and Obama probably won't side with each other once the primaries are finished.
    ya its in the 'bible belt' Rudy was bound to loose with the story that comes behind him. Edwards will do a great vice to BO. It is also surprising that a super liberal like Hillary could win in Florida. funny things
    go OB!
    IF

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Obama, Hillary exchange jabs as Arnie backs McCain
    Posted: 01 February 2008 1434 hrs

    HOLLYWOOD - Democratic heavyweights Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama faced off in their first one-on-one debate of the 2008 White House race here Thursday, trading a series of pointed jabs but no knock-out blows.

    A star-studded audience at the Kodak Theatre -- home of the Oscars -- was on hand for the eagerly anticipated showdown, notable for its civil tenor and marked lack of the angry histrionics seen in previous encounters.

    The face-off between Obama and Clinton was billed as a historic clash between either the first woman challenger for the presidency or the first black candidate, both seeking to build momentum heading into next week's Super Tuesday selection battles when more than 20 states will pick their candidates.

    Elsewhere, California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger endorsed Arizona Senator John McCain, giving the Republican front-runner another key boost before next week's potentially decisive battles in 22 states.

    But all eyes were on Hollywood as Obama and Clinton went toe-to-toe in front of a packed audience that included entertainment industry icons ranging from Steven Spielberg to Stevie Wonder.

    Illinois Senator Obama -- seeking to emphasize his campaign theme of change and a break with old-style politics -- opened the debate by describing the forthcoming election as a choice between "the past and the future."

    Former First Lady Clinton meanwhile returned to her theme of experience -- indirectly highlighting Obama's perceived lack of it -- by stressing the need for the incoming president to be ready to lead from day one.

    The issue of judgment provoked one of the rare flashpoints, with Obama once again drawing attention to Clinton's 2002 vote to support the use of military force in Iraq.

    "Senator Clinton has claimed, fairly, she's got the experience on day one. And, part of the argument that I'm making in this campaign is that, it is important to be right on day one," Obama said.

    But the overwhelming tone was conciliatory, with Obama and Clinton all smiles as the debate ended, warmly congratulating each other.

    Obama did not even rule out the possibility of a so-called dream-ticket involving the two. While discounting the talk of prospective running mates as "premature," Obama acknowledged Clinton "would be on anybody's shortlist."

    Earlier, there had been differences of opinion on the issues of Iraq and international diplomacy, with one testy exchange on immigration reform.

    Clinton took aim at Obama's stated intention to seek talks with the United States' traditional foes, most notably Iran.

    "I think that we've got to have a full diplomatic effort, but I don't think the president should ... have meetings without preconditions with five of the worst dictators in the world," Clinton said.

    Obama responded by reminding the audience of his opposition to the war in Iraq, adding that the next president would be required to show "the kind of judgment that will ensure that we are using our military power wisely."

    With more than 2,500 delegates up for grabs on both the Republican and Democratic sides on February 5, the campaigns are all going into over-drive.

    The Democratic race has now been transformed into a straight fight between Obama, 46, and Clinton, 60, and although the former first lady has the edge with four states under her belt to Obama's two, all eyes are on Super Tuesday.

    In a boost for Obama, campaign organizers said the Illinois senator, seeking to be the first black president, had raked in some 32 million dollars in funds in January alone.

    But a spokesman for Clinton dismissed the figures, saying what counted was whether people voted for the New York senator.

    "Fundraising is one of the most important markers in the lead up to voting. But once people start voting, that's a more important measure of a campaign's success," Jay Carson said.

    Both Obama and Clinton also have to look beyond the primaries to their possible Republican opponent in the November election, with the formidable McCain now favoured to earn his party's nomination.

    Schwarzenegger's backing for McCain came after former New York mayor Rudolph Giuliani quit the race late Wednesday and threw his support behind the Arizona senator, his long-time pal.

    Analysts said Schwarzenegger's endorsement gives the 71-year-old senator's campaign an aura of inevitability.

    "An endorsement like this helps to create the impression that McCain is building up unstoppable momentum, that he is the clear front-runner," University of Southern California analyst Sherry Bebitch-Jeffe told AFP.

    Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney is still promising to give McCain a run for his money, and the two clashed repeatedly late Wednesday in a heated televised debated at the Reagan Presidential Library outside Los Angeles. - AFP/ir

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin View Post
    Obama, Hillary exchange jabs as Arnie backs McCain
    Posted: 01 February 2008 1434 hrs
    talk **** simi jabs?! if you watch the debate you will they were both very cordial to each other. for once they look united and didn't lead the media goad them into taking potshots at each other.

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by garou12 View Post
    talk **** simi jabs?! if you watch the debate you will they were both very cordial to each other. for once they look united and didn't lead the media goad them into taking potshots at each other.
    cordial that's d word. but united-never!!!!
    IF

  19. #59

    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by emirates View Post
    cordial that's d word. but united-never!!!!
    sez u...if those 2 decide to be running mates the democratics will confirm win.

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    Default Re: Huckabee, Obama sweep to Iowa victories !!!

    Obama scores first Democrat win abroad for 'Super Tuesday'
    Posted: 05 February 2008 1352 hrs

    JAKARTA : US Democrat Party voters in Indonesia, where Barack Obama spent part of his childhood, handed him a win over Hillary Clinton in the first voting abroad on "Super Tuesday," party officials said.

    Seventy-five percent of nearly 100 votes cast by expatriate Americans just past midnight (1700 GMT Monday) went to Obama and 25 percent went to Clinton, Democrats Abroad officials here said.

    Results still need formal verification.

    Registered Democrats in Indonesia's capital Jakarta were the first to vote in person on the day of the US mega-primary, which will select more than half the delegates to the Democratic National Convention in August.

    The convention will in turn choose the party's presidential candidate in the race for the White House.

    Voting for Democrats living overseas has begun and will last until February 12. They will send 22 delegates to the convention at which they will have a combined 11 votes.

    Arian Ardie, the chairman of Democrats Abroad's Indonesia committee, said local Democratic officials tried to create a buzz similar to that surrounding the New Hampshire town of Dixville Notch which held a midnight vote in that state's primary.

    "It was really our idea in order to perhaps differentiate ourselves from the other voting centres," Ardie said, referring to the decision to open voting at midnight.

    Obama moved to Indonesia when he was six after his divorced mother remarried an Indonesian foreign student.

    "It was very powerful. I had an Indonesian stepfather. I went to an Indonesian-speaking school," the Illinois senator has said of his time in the world's most populous Muslim nation.

    "It gave me an enormous appreciation for the magnificent culture and history of Asia. It gave me a great love for the people of Asia," he said.

    The Obama appeal is also clear in the Channel NewsAsia website poll.

    Minutes after the oline poll went up on for a feel of the favorites among favourites went up, Obama took the lead.

    The Democrats continue to hold the lead on the Channelnewsasia.com poll, with Senator Hillary Clinton coming in second and Republican John McCain third.

    However in recent Gallup polls, 47% of people who took the opinion poll chose Hillary Clinton, followed by Barack Obama with 43%.

    The numbers are the same in an ABC News poll, while the CBS News poll sees both Democrat candidates tied at 41% of popular vote. - AFP/CNA/sf

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