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Thread: Prosumer or DSLR

  1. #1

    Default Prosumer or DSLR

    Always wanted to ask this question, a newbie to photography and wanted to learn and explore more.
    Should I get a prosumer camera like G3 or 5700 etc
    or go straight into DSLR if I going to invest in photography as a hobby
    I understand performance wise with all the lens selection DSLR is of cuz must better, but in terms of initial learning is the prosumer series a better choice? Pls enlighten me and all other newbies considering switching to DSLR or prosumer
    thanx
    Last edited by tangoninazero; 23rd May 2003 at 10:16 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member ivor's Avatar
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    Since you are only asking about digital photography, in my honest opinion, you should start out with prosumer DC first as,

    1. It is lower in cost compare to DSLR.

    2. Should you decide 1 month after purchased the DC, that photography is not game enough for you, you can let go without much 'pain'

    3. Learn the photography fundamental prior getting a DSLR. Go for a basic SLR course, before going seriously into DSLR.

    Just my 2 cents opinion.

  3. #3

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    Yup.... Good advice from ivor.....

    Get a prosumer 1st.... Otherwise U will be overwhelmed.....

    Even for my Minolta Dimage 7i... I am still using it very much as a Point & Shoot camera.... haven't really used the manual features coz I haven't master it.....

    If U jump too fast.... U will get discouraged coz U dun get the pictures to turn out the way U like them to be.....

  4. #4
    Senior Member jOhO's Avatar
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    well... i'm a newbie too and i didn't even THINK of going dSLR at all. one of the main reasons is that it was WAY WAY over my budget. even the 5700 which i bought blew the budget (was looking at around G2/G3 price 1100-1300) but end up spending 1800++ at the IT show.

    after playing with my 5700 and netting a few shots that i'm really happy with, i'm glad that my interest in photography hasn't waned, but feel that that's still heaps to learn. for me, i'm gonna try to get the basics of photography down pat so that when i shell out for that dSLR (it'll be a WHILE yet!) i'm gonna be sure that i'll use it to the fullest.

    some of my friends have "commented" why i spent so much on a camera when it might be a "3 minute heat" kind of thing. they might be right, but so far my digicam hasn't really had a rest for more than a few days so this bodes well for my photography "career". but in case i ever lose interest, i wouldn't have wasted all the money on a dSLR and lenses and accessories.

  5. #5

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    Originally posted by jOhO
    some of my friends have "commented" why i spent so much on a camera when it might be a "3 minute heat" kind of thing. they might be right, but so far my digicam hasn't really had a rest for more than a few days so this bodes well for my photography "career". but in case i ever lose interest, i wouldn't have wasted all the money on a dSLR and lenses and accessories.
    Actually, I think the best way to learn photography is to go for film SLR first. I notice people who started out with film cameras often have a better grasp of photography concepts when they switch to a DSLR.

    Of cos this is not a rule. Juz my humble opinion...

  6. #6

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    noted all the pointers and advises
    thank pals

  7. #7
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    Just wondering - if any professional CSer struck on a prosumer cam and stayed on there happily ever after.....

  8. #8

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    Originally posted by David
    Actually, I think the best way to learn photography is to go for film SLR first. I notice people who started out with film cameras often have a better grasp of photography concepts when they switch to a DSLR.

    Of cos this is not a rule. Juz my humble opinion...
    Yes, but using film, does impose fear on the newbie as he/she is afraid to take too many shots of the same picture at different settings as it is wasteful or it's expensive to develop.

    The prosumer DSLR can allow the user to take a shot of a building at various settings from the widest aperature to the smallest, at ISO 100 to 800, and from the several seconds to 1/1000 or more shutter speeds.

    It makes it easier to understand how the various settings affect the image, for example a small aperature results in darker image and wider aperature results in brighter image...etc and the newbie is more willing to make mistakes as it is less costly than a film SLR.

    I have taken over 2000 shots from the first time I gotten my prosumer and is starting to understand the various settings (I am a slow learner).

    Imagine the cost of 2000 shots in terms of film!!!
    It will be like buying 56 rolls of 36 exposures film. and the developing costs is hundreds of dollars alone, not counting the printing costs for 2000 shots!!!
    Not to forget the number of CR2 lithium batteries drained.
    Last edited by Winston; 20th May 2003 at 06:53 PM.

  9. #9

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    Whether to get a consumer, prosumer or a digital SLR really, at the end of the day, depends on what you want to do. If you are a recreational "birthday parties" type, then do consider getting the consumer type. A good recommendation is the Canon A70, gives you full manual controls, versatile, and is relatively cheap for the wallet. I cannot recommend this cam enough, because at the price level, and among its peers, it is a distinct winner.

    But if you already know what is aperture priority etc, have ben shooting in manual mode, and have been using film for some time, then you might want to try out the prosumer type (5700, F602Z, 7Hi, G3 etc). But you might hate them, for all DCs suffer from varying degrees of lags (shutter release lag, AF lag, read/write memory lag etc). And you might find the large depth of field a put-off. And you might find learning and manipulating your images in Adobe Photoshop a pain in the proverbial place.

    What DAVID mentioned is absolutely true. There really is no short cut for learning photography. In digital, newbies to photography take tons of pictures with scant regard for techniques, thinking that Photoshop will rescue a poorly exposed shot, or badly composed image, or improper white balance.

    You learn when it hurts, and through film, you learn the hard way, but you will learn what it really is all about.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Prosumer or DSLR

    Originally posted by tangoninazero
    Always wanted to ask this question, a newbie to photography and wanted to learn and explore more.
    Should I get a prosumer camera like G3 or 5700 etc
    or go straight into DSLR if I going to invest in photography as a hobby
    I understand performance wise with all the lens selection DSLR is of cuz must better, but in terms of initial learning is the prosumer series a better choice? Pls enlighten me and all other newbies considering switching to DSLR
    thanx

    I think you should get a camera according to your budget since it is a hobby.

    Learning wise... you can do it with a prosumer/DSLR/SLR/PnS.
    The technical side is easier to pick up compare.
    The artisitc side... like color/composition is harder to learn.

    Happy shooting and learning from what you shoot!

  11. #11

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    Hi Kenny.
    My advice is prosumer also... u can slowly upgrade as u advance.. anyway the G3 is a very good camera to start off with aredi considering it's price now also... i think it's really worth it.

    Unless u're a hardcore...and really wanna discipline and learn from basics.. start from something like the FM2. A manual focus SLR body.

  12. #12
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    Originally posted by David
    Actually, I think the best way to learn photography is to go for film SLR first. I notice people who started out with film cameras often have a better grasp of photography concepts when they switch to a DSLR.

    Of cos this is not a rule. Juz my humble opinion...
    Umm, don't really agree to that because in those days before DC arrives, film SLR is the only choice for equipment with full manul control anyway. Now, prosumer provide the same control, with some restriction of course such has not enough zoom or sensitivity. Each element of controls are there, just the scope is not wide enough.

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by fruitybix
    Whether to get a consumer, prosumer or a digital SLR really, at the end of the day, depends on what you want to do. If you are a recreational "birthday parties" type, then do consider getting the consumer type. A good recommendation is the Canon A70, gives you full manual controls, versatile, and is relatively cheap for the wallet. I cannot recommend this cam enough, because at the price level, and among its peers, it is a distinct winner.

    But if you already know what is aperture priority etc, have ben shooting in manual mode, and have been using film for some time, then you might want to try out the prosumer type (5700, F602Z, 7Hi, G3 etc). But you might hate them, for all DCs suffer from varying degrees of lags (shutter release lag, AF lag, read/write memory lag etc). And you might find the large depth of field a put-off. And you might find learning and manipulating your images in Adobe Photoshop a pain in the proverbial place.

    What DAVID mentioned is absolutely true. There really is no short cut for learning photography. In digital, newbies to photography take tons of pictures with scant regard for techniques, thinking that Photoshop will rescue a poorly exposed shot, or badly composed image, or improper white balance.

    You learn when it hurts, and through film, you learn the hard way, but you will learn what it really is all about.


    Good points u made there fruitybix. Prosumer digicams are very good learning tools for beginners to photography because they also offer manual controls and are feature packed. I myself started out that way too. However I soon found out that the shutter lag and AF lag was really a pain in the neck to bear and hence sold off my prosumer and got myself an SLR.

    Agree wif your point that there is no short cut for learning photography. For instance, getting a DSLR or SLR doesn't immediately make one an expert photographer overnight. However, it does give u a boost in the technical aspect, i.e generally speaking, lower shutter lag, faster AF, the flexibility of interchangeable lens etc. Whether or not it helps the individual to take better photographs depends on his or her ability to learn, and also having a good grasp of photography basics also helps.

    In digital, newbies to photography take tons of pictures with scant regard for techniques, thinking that Photoshop will rescue a poorly exposed shot, or badly composed image, or improper white balance.
    Not to be critical but I think it is too sweeping a statement. Not all newbies are like that, perhaps some (or a few) are guilty of it, those that fall in this group just need a little guidance and help from more experienced photographers to get their shots right and not to rely too much on PS to disguise or hide their mistakes.(This forum for e.g is a GREAT place for that). Everyone needs to start somewhere, and you or me or anybody else could have taken their first shots badly too, perhaps liek u said, bad composition, and try to use PS to crop the picture to a better one.

    In this respect I feel that I totally do agree with your last point. Film is brutal in its honesty...what you take is what you get, warts and all. I just started using a film SLR, and most of my first few rolls had shots that were over/under exposed, bad composition, motion blur, camera shake etc. that you cannot erase away or sprinkle some PS magic on. Every roll I had perhaps only around 10 shots (or even less) that were keepers. At about $18.00 per roll for costs of film and developing costs, yes, it is hard on the wallet, but is probably the most effective (and "painful") way to learn photography. As you had mentioned, the "hard way".

    Just my humble 2cts, pls dun flame me.

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    Best way to learn ... film slr and slides ... it'll make you stop think then shoot.

  15. #15

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    Thanks folk for all the valuable advises.
    Last edited by tangoninazero; 23rd May 2003 at 10:23 PM.

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    You could learn a lot with a prosumer camera and may not even need to upgrade. Given the large price difference (considering the cost to buy lenses), it's better to start with a prosumer (like S602Z, G4, 5700, 717, 7Hi, etc) or even a consumer camera (like A70 which offers some semi-auto and manual controls).

    I haven't found a need to upgrade from the S602Z as it could meet most of my needs.
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

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    Originally posted by mpenza
    You could learn a lot with a prosumer camera and may not even need to upgrade. Given the large price difference (considering the cost to buy lenses), it's better to start with a prosumer (like S602Z, G4, 5700, 717, 7Hi, etc) or even a consumer camera (like A70 which offers some semi-auto and manual controls).

    I haven't found a need to upgrade from the S602Z as it could meet most of my needs.
    G4?

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    Originally posted by beluga
    G4?
    G1 + G3 = G4

  19. #19
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    typo meant G3
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

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    Originally posted by eug
    Best way to learn ... film slr and slides ... it'll make you stop think then shoot.
    I differ, best way to learn is to view and critic your own photos.
    What you like or don't like about this photo etc?

    Be selective. Choose the best one and THROW/keep out of sight the rest!

    Article by Mike Johnston

    Hope this helps.

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