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Thread: lenses for church wedding

  1. #1
    UStime
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    Default lenses for church wedding

    Hi,

    Juz curious.. how many different lenses do you all bring when you do church wedding shoots? Is 70-20mm necessary? Or will a 28-70 cover most of the scenes... Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: lenses for church wedding

    Originally posted by UStime
    Hi,

    Juz curious.. how many different lenses do you all bring when you do church wedding shoots? Is 70-20mm necessary? Or will a 28-70 cover most of the scenes... Thanks.
    Depends on the church, and how close you can get, and what you wanna get. I've covered a church wedding with 20, 28-105 and 80-200 once. I shot another with just a 35-70.

    Regards
    CK

  3. #3

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    SLR or DSLR? It makes a difference for those group shots!!

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    Originally posted by Java_Guru
    SLR or DSLR? It makes a difference for those group shots!!
    wat difference? sorree i dun use EITHER but interested to know cos will eventually get dSLR once i got the money, and my "skill" justifies spending that money.

  5. #5

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    SLR or DSLR? It makes a difference for those group shots!!
    i think he means focal length multiplier on DSLR=> hard to squeeze in a big group for restricted wideangle


    from a film point of view, get lenses that cover 20mm to 400mm. then u r covered. it fact this formula works for any type of event. ie for best result, spend the $ and get 17-35mm/2.8, 28-70mm/2.8, 80-200/2.8, 300mm/2.8, 1.4x, 2x. dont worry about hunchback, you should be garang enough to carry the weight otherwise u r...

    to save space or weight (if u really not garang enough for f2.8zooms), then=>swap primes: 24mm, 50mm, 100mm, 200mm
    Last edited by clive; 16th May 2003 at 12:53 PM.

  6. #6

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    or just one super duper zoom lens 28-300

  7. #7

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    I use 28-80mm lens. Of course at some shots I wish to have a 80-200mm zoom, but then that's just one two shots out of 7 rolls.

    From the feedback of the audiences, I am kind of blocking some of the important views (changing rings), but that's because I am recording the moments using my camera. I am sure the bridge and groom wouldn't mind. Using a longer lens I might be able to stand further, but I am not sure if I have time to think/walk far.
    DR KOH KHO KING

  8. #8
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    me use 2 lenses as standard - 24-85mm & 70/80-200. the 24-85 is the one used most, for group shots, table shots, etc. the 70/80-200 is for candids and the occasional close-up, and for clubbing people out of the way when they blocking my view hahahah.

  9. #9
    UStime
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    Originally posted by clive
    i think he means focal length multiplier on DSLR=> hard to squeeze in a big group for restricted wideangle


    from a film point of view, get lenses that cover 20mm to 400mm. then u r covered. it fact this formula works for any type of event. ie for best result, spend the $ and get 17-35mm/2.8, 28-70mm/2.8, 80-200/2.8, 300mm/2.8, 1.4x, 2x. dont worry about hunchback, you should be garang enough to carry the weight otherwise u r...

    to save space or weight (if u really not garang enough for f2.8zooms), then=>swap primes: 24mm, 50mm, 100mm, 200mm
    Thanks all for your feedback!

    Clive, you're just joking right or have you really shot weddings using those lenses?!! For 20mm to 400mm + tc, of cos you're well-covered for practically almost about all forms of photography but i'd like it to be practical based on the lens used most often for a church wedding in particular, not general photography.

    I don't think primes fit the bill for a wedding right?! Changing the lenses is too much of a hassle and time wasted for important shots.

    For indoor shots, do you all use 70-200mm often? I did once b4 but with full flash. Lighting wise i find it's not very good especially for colour film photography as with a long focal length, it's hard to get natural lighting based on my shutter speed used.

  10. #10
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    I would have to agree what clive has mentioned. You never know what kind of situation that you would be in even when you are doing church weddings. Even worse, some church weddings might not even allow you to use flash. What then?

    However, if you are going to use DSLR, I really would suggest that you get 3 zoom lenses. Get 17-35, 28-70 and 70/80-200. The reason for this is that you want both wide angle shots as well as close ups. With lenses within that range, you will be well covered at all focal lengths.

  11. #11

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    Originally posted by agape01
    Even worse, some church weddings might not even allow you to use flash. What then?
    Really?

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    Regarding prime lenses, it is entirely possible to cover a wedding with just 2, say a 28 and a 50. I've covered a dinner (minus table shots) with just a single 50mm on a friend's wedding where I am not official.

    From experience, 80-200 is the least used. But of coz, the nagging feeling "what if I need it" is always there.....

    Regards
    CK

  13. #13
    UStime
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    Originally posted by agape01
    I would have to agree what clive has mentioned. You never know what kind of situation that you would be in even when you are doing church weddings. Even worse, some church weddings might not even allow you to use flash. What then?
    Har..... You mean this is what u did when you shot weddings?!

    I really want a TYPICAL usage.... those who shoot weddings often and pros who have done it b4... what is the one lens u use most often and is the most practical? Pls, not some 200 f/1.8! Something most used and convenient.

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by UStime
    Har..... You mean this is what u did when you shot weddings?!

    I really want a TYPICAL usage.... those who shoot weddings often and pros who have done it b4... what is the one lens u use most often and is the most practical? Pls, not some 200 f/1.8! Something most used and convenient.
    If you want to know what I use:
    1. 20/2.8
    2. 50/1.4
    3. 28-70/2.8

    These are the most common I use. 80-200mm very, very seldom. Increase weight only.

    As to specifics, it really depends on you and the wedding. Like I've said, I've covered one with mainly a 50. Another with just a 28-70. Another with just a 35-70.

    Regards
    CK

  15. #15
    UStime
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    Originally posted by ckiang
    Regarding prime lenses, it is entirely possible to cover a wedding with just 2, say a 28 and a 50. I've covered a dinner (minus table shots) with just a single 50mm on a friend's wedding where I am not official.

    From experience, 80-200 is the least used. But of coz, the nagging feeling "what if I need it" is always there.....

    Regards
    CK
    Yah, for dinners, it is quite possible since the composition is quite fixed, and you're not hte main photog. But for church wedding? Tough I think. One moment you got to capture the bride and groom walking in, the next a close up of their faces, then the whole environment, etc. I foresee some missed shots and kan-cheongness!

    I have more experience in travel photography but not weddings so I'd like some opinions. I used to favor primes but now I think zooms are the way to go, especially for traveling. Sharpness wise, primes aren't any much better than fixed aperture zooms.

    I tried to be gungho recently and brought only primes for a trip. (Been influenced by some books I read b4 that but now realized those pros got lotsa time and well-informed guides to lead them!)

    Man, it was a pain!! Firstly the cold of winter, and the constant changing of lenses. It's good if you have a lot of time in your hands... but on a holiday, not a pleasing experience for me. You may get some good composition but also lose a couple because of the fixed focal lengths.

    Yup, I agree with CK. I think in all forms of photography, there's the nagging feeling of "what if i need it"... but a line has to be drawn. Maybe that's why many pple buy lenses, only to sell them after a short usage bcos they realize they hardly use them. I always think you can bring a 400 f/2.8 on a holiday. Just in case...
    But seriously, how often? And is it economical? Maybe sports or wildlife. But for others...?

    Thanks all, think I'll bring along my 70-200mm... just in case. But i should think 28-70 is fair enuff for more than 80% of the shots in church right?

  16. #16
    UStime
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    Originally posted by ckiang
    If you want to know what I use:
    1. 20/2.8
    2. 50/1.4
    3. 28-70/2.8

    These are the most common I use. 80-200mm very, very seldom. Increase weight only.

    Regards
    CK
    CK, what do you do with the 50 f/1.4? Available light photography?

    For 80-200mm, I fear the lighting... I'll prob blast with the flash which might cause unnatural color cast, especially with fluroscent or tungsten... I won't be doing b/w.
    Last edited by UStime; 16th May 2003 at 05:38 PM.

  17. #17

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    Originally posted by UStime
    ... One moment you got to capture the bride and groom walking in, the next a close up of their faces, then the whole environment, etc. I foresee some missed shots and kan-cheongness!
    .....
    Man, it was a pain!! Firstly the cold of winter, and the constant changing of lenses. It's good if you have a lot of time in your hands... but on a holiday, not a pleasing experience for me. You may get some good composition but also lose a couple because of the fixed focal lengths.

    If you look around during wedding dinners, events etc, the main photographer will ALWAYS carry 2 cams with him, one as a backup. Also, i hardly see them changing lens, swapping and swapping. I know this guy he sports a wide-angle on 1 cam, and a 28-135 on the other, this really saves time and prevent him from losing opportunities.

    Of course, if you are not the main shooter, then perhaps not as critical to have 2 cam. But if you find yourself swapping lens more than shooting, then something is obviously amissed.

  18. #18
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    Originally posted by UStime
    CK, what do you do with the 50 f/1.4? Available light photography?

    For 80-200mm, I fear the lighting... I'll prob blast with the flash which might cause unnatural color cast, especially with fluroscent or tungsten... I won't be doing b/w.
    Yeah, the 50/1.4 for available light.

    Regards
    CK

  19. #19
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    Originally posted by UStime
    Yah, for dinners, it is quite possible since the composition is quite fixed, and you're not hte main photog. But for church wedding? Tough I think. One moment you got to capture the bride and groom walking in, the next a close up of their faces, then the whole environment, etc. I foresee some missed shots and kan-cheongness!

    I have more experience in travel photography but not weddings so I'd like some opinions. I used to favor primes but now I think zooms are the way to go, especially for traveling. Sharpness wise, primes aren't any much better than fixed aperture zooms.

    I tried to be gungho recently and brought only primes for a trip. (Been influenced by some books I read b4 that but now realized those pros got lotsa time and well-informed guides to lead them!)

    Man, it was a pain!! Firstly the cold of winter, and the constant changing of lenses. It's good if you have a lot of time in your hands... but on a holiday, not a pleasing experience for me. You may get some good composition but also lose a couple because of the fixed focal lengths.

    Yup, I agree with CK. I think in all forms of photography, there's the nagging feeling of "what if i need it"... but a line has to be drawn. Maybe that's why many pple buy lenses, only to sell them after a short usage bcos they realize they hardly use them. I always think you can bring a 400 f/2.8 on a holiday. Just in case...
    But seriously, how often? And is it economical? Maybe sports or wildlife. But for others...?

    Thanks all, think I'll bring along my 70-200mm... just in case. But i should think 28-70 is fair enuff for more than 80% of the shots in church right?
    From experience, a lens in the range of 28-70 or 17-35 depending on your style should cover most of it. Learn to anticipate moments - that's more important. Not *everything* needs to be covered, it would be impossible to do so. Concentrate on the important events, but keep a look out for the "side events" and "candid events" as well.

    Regards
    CK

  20. #20

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    I haven't covered a wedding in a few years but my kit use to be...

    2x F4s with 16/2.8, 24/2.8, 50/1.4, 85/1.8, 135/2.5, 180/2.8, 35-70/2.8 and Metz flash units.

    EDIT: forgot to add, use to also carry an FA or FE2 as well

    If I start to do weddings again my kit will be what I own at the moment

    F80s, F100 with 20/2.8, 35/2, 50/1.8, 85/1.8 and 180/2.8 and SB-80 flash. I will be adding a 16/2.8 later on this year.
    Last edited by james m; 17th May 2003 at 10:04 AM.

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