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Thread: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

  1. #1
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    Default [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Following feedback from xtemujin, I've created a thread solely for reviews, user comments and feedback on ThinkTank Photo Bags and products.

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    User Review:
    First Impressions - ThinkTank Airport Antidote

    Introduction.
    I went down to TK Foto to get the bag. For those who are targetting this bag, it's being sold at $279 (inclusive of GST).

    Build Quality.
    The build is excellent. IMHO it beats the hell out of Lowepro. The fabric feels very well put together, and I would be confident that my equipment is well-protected when inside the bag.

    Interior.
    The internal dividers are very Crumpler-style; you can attach them to each other and the walls of the main compartment. In all, TT gave me 6 larger sized dividers, 5 smaller ones, and two main dividers that can run across the length of the bag.

    IMHO a very nice touch to have, so you can customise the interior however you want. So far, I've been through two configurations, namely an almost empty bag for modular system components to be dumped inside, and a lite setup, so I can carry all my stuff inside with use of the dividers.

    I foresee myself using the first option more often, especially when shooting church or other events.

    Also, two see-thru, semi-transparent pouches on the inside of the flap provide easy storage for extra batteries, cards, cleaning kit and other miscellaneous odds and ends. Because they are see through, you can quickly check that you have what you need to bring, without having to open the compartment and rummage through the whole pocket.

    Exterior.
    Straps take a bit of getting used to, but I'm sure in due time I'll grow to love it. The bag feels good when being worn - it doesn't feel awkward or unergonomic. A nice small pocket at the top for keys or an MP3 player is a nice touch.

    There are three carrying handles: on top, on the side and at the bottom. This is rather overkill, but it helps when you need to grab it quick I guess. I do not foresee any use of the other two handles besides the top one.

    Usage of the elastic band to secure stray excess strap is a little dodgy IMHO. The straps often find themselves moving around soon after, and I find one shoulder strap longer than the other. However, this is a minor point. Otherwise, the bag is excellent.

    There are also attachment loops off to one side of the bag, so you can attach a tripod/monopod strap (provided) to the side, then slot a tripod/monopod into the side pocket, securing it with the strap. TT also provides a tripod pocket for longer tripods, so the legs hang off the bag into the pocket, rather than into the side pocket, where it will stick out a large bit on top of the bag. TT also provides a folder with instructions on how to attach the tripod/monopod straps, and the tripod pocket.

    Other Stuff.
    The bag comes with a folder that has pictures and captions of some professional ThinkTank users in the field. In the folder also, are instructions on how to attach the miscellaneous tripod/monopod loops and tripod pocket.

    The bag also comes with ThinkTank's Artificial Intelligence15 (AI15), meant for 15" Notebooks. Slimmer 15" notebooks such as the Apple MacBook Pro will fit comfortably, but thicker ones will be a squeeze. There is a front compartment on the AI15 for pens, odds&ends, a notepad, your AC adaptor, a notebook mouse and other stuff. Handy, and it might find use as a schoolbag if I don't have much to bring.

    The only thing I dislike about the AI15 is the top-slinging design. This is to say that if I attach the shoulder strap to the AI15, it would be slinging with the breadth of the notebook facing the ground, as opposed to the more conventional length of the notebook facing the ground. I think it looks downright weird.

    The AI15 fits into a large stretch pocket at the front, which has a zipper on its side to secure the AI15 in place.

    Overall.
    I have yet to extensively use the bag, but so far, it has impressed me. I will be trying it out over a long event this coming weekend, and will update you guys.
    Last edited by calebk; 23rd April 2009 at 03:13 PM. Reason: typo error

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    Default Change Up Review

    Item Reviewed Think Tank Change Up

    Introduction
    The Change Up (CU) is one of the latest products from Think Tank Photo (TTP) and is a hybrid beltpack which combines the use of a standard beltpack, shoulder/sling bag and a chest harness depending on your configuration. I purchased the CU directly from TTP and the item cost ~190 SGD exclusive of shipping charges. The item can now be gotten from TK Photo at only 179 SGD (inclusive of GST)!

    Items in Package
    As expected of TTP products, the CU comes with a generous assortment of divider in different sizes. The CU also comes with an internal padding which fits the interior nicely and offers extra protection. It comes with two shoulder straps for the purpose of transforming the CU into a standard beltpack, shoulder/sling bag or a chest harness. To protect the CU from the elements, it also comes with a detachable rain cover.

    Build Quality
    The build of CU feels better than the CompuDayPack and Slingshot and does not feel as rough as the Crumpler Keystone. The dividers feels like Lowepro's but are less flimsy.

    Internal
    With the generous amount of dividers, you can attach them to the walls of the padding and create your own configuration. The padding can be removed to free up more space but I prefer more protection for my precious equipment. Also, two transparent pockets are located on the outside of the padding for easy storage of memory cards. The pockets are able to contain CF cards in cases. The detachable rain cover is secured to the interior of the main compartment and can be removed for drying.

    External
    The front zippered pocket has several slots for storing pen, cards, and other assortment of stuffs and there is a blue-coloured strap for attaching the Pixel Pocket Rocket which is not included in the package.

    The CU has four pockets made up of stretchable materials. They stick close to the body but can be expanded to take more stuffs. As demostrated in the official website, the side pockets are capable of taking a SB800! The front pockets are great places to temporarily store the body/lens/hotshoe/socket caps which are so prone to missing.

    There are three modulus loops on each belt, seperated by stitches that allows further configuration of the CU by adding additional modulus components such as Chimp Cage, Lens Changer, Lightning Fast and so on. The components can be held in place by inserting the plastic plate into the loop.

    The shoulder straps are somewhat of a let down. The straps are adjustable in length with a loose end allowing quick adjustment. However, the straps are not slip-proof and the CU will slip with a heavy load when used as a shoulder bag. The loose end should be secured in place with a rubber or fabric loop.

    The belts are very comfortable as they are extremely wide and have thick paddings. The adjustable portion can be hiddden in the secret pockets on the inside of the wider portion. Following which, the whole belt can be concealed in the pocket at the back of CU. The belts cannot be tucked away when modulus components are attached.

    Test Configurations
    Prior to upgrading to D200, I had the D80 and an assortment of other accessories and I was surprised to find that the CU is capable of taking them all in the main compartment! Following is what are stored inside the main compartment:

    1. Nikon D80
    2. Nikon MB-D80
    3. Nikon 18-200 with original hood reversed
    4. Nikon 50/1.4 with KS-9 hood attached
    5. Nikon SB800 with original diffuser
    6. Rocket Blower

    The CU is seperated into three partitions of which the biggest partition has the 18-200 attached to the D80 and the camera is placed with lens facing down. The MB-D80 is detached and sits at the bottom of the CU. SB800 is placed in vertical position with the flash positioned at 90 degrees. The 50/1.4 is placed on top of the rocket blower in another partition. Another lens of similar length to the 60/2.8 or 18-200 can take the place of the rocket blower without problem.

    However, as the D200 is a bigger camera, the configuration is now significantly changed:

    1. Nikon D200
    2. Nikon MB-D200
    3. Nikon 18-200 with original hood reversed
    4. Nikon 50/1.4 with KS-9 hood attached

    The main compartment is now split into two partitions with the bigger one containing the D200 with MB-D200 attached. The 18-200 and 50/1.4 sit in the other with a divider seperating them. The SB800 and rocket blower can no longer be put in the main compartment.

    Please note that the above configurations introduce a little bulge in the main compartment which may impact the use of the front zippered pocket.

    Conclusion
    The CU is an amazing beltpack with occasional use as a chest harness or shoulder bag. It is able to take a significant load but will only feel comfortable when used as a beltpack. In my opinion, when configured with additional components, CU can stand head-to-head with the pro belt system.


    NOTE: This review will updated after I exchange the CU. Pictures will be uploaded later
    Last edited by Randius; 19th January 2009 at 01:54 PM.

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Item Reviewed: Think Tank Trim Changer

    Introduction
    The Trim Changer (TC) is a simple, small pouch from Think Tank Photo (TTP). The item can now be gotten from TK Photo at 55 SGD (inclusive of GST)

    Items in Package
    The TC comes with three dividers of same size. The TC also comes with an internal padded insert which fits the interior nicely and offers extra protection. To protect the CU from the elements, it also comes with a detachable rain cover.

    Build Quality
    The exterior of TC feels better than the CompuDayPack and Slingshot and does not feel as rough as the Crumpler Keystone. The dividers feels like Lowepro's but are less flimsy.

    Internal
    You can attach the dividers to the walls of the padded insert or the main compartment tocreate your own configuration. The padding insert can be removed to free up more space but I prefer more protection for my precious equipment. Also, two transparent pockets are located on the outside of the insert for easy storage of memory cards. The pockets are able to contain CF cards in cases. The detachable rain cover is secured to the interior of the main compartment and can be removed for drying.

    External
    The TC has two front mesh pockets which can be expanded to take more stuffs. The front pockets are great places to temporarily store the body/lens/hotshoe/socket caps which are so prone to missing.

    The "Rotate-and-Lock" mechanism located at the back of TC allows it to be attached to other bags and pouches with the modulus loop. The TC can be held in place by inserting the plastic plate into the loop.

    Test Configurations
    I have not used the TC to keep other accessories but to house the D200 with the battery grip attached! The whole camera fits nicely into TC but leaves little space for keeping the original strap. I figured that TTP's own camera strap can be kept properly. Please note that when used this way, neoprene strap cannot be kept unless the camera is kept without the battery grip.

    Conclusion
    The TC is a simple pouch which can have other uses as demonstrated above. It offers good protection for the equipment and has a thin profile which sticks to the body. It is a good companion to TTP's own belt system and belt packs.


    NOTE: This review will be updated as I use the TC more. Pictures will be uploaded later

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Pics of the items can be found here http:www.thinktankphoto.com

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Item Reviewed: Urban Disguise 10

    Why?
    Like many of you, once you get into photography, first thing you notice is that you have a lot of bags. I don't necessarily need them, but sometimes you think you need all the different configurations you can find. I have been planning on a go-light style whenever I travel, either day trips or week long hiking/backpacking trip, so bringing a second backpack-like camera bag is out of the question. In a recent trip to Taipei, I bought a UD10 (subject of this mini-review) and a Speed Demon, which I will perhaps describe another weekend.

    Why UD10? Its small, looks like a largish passport document case, or a man-bag which a lot of north asians seem to carry to "conceal" their cash. ITs the smallest of the Urban Disguise models

    What fits in it?
    I have tried to fit in my D2H into the bag, and it will barely fit just the body alone, and maybe a pancake lens. I don't have a smaller DSLR so I have no idea what else fits in there other than a D200 or 40D. What its good for is for rangefinders and a spare digital point and shoot. For those days when you need to go really light.

    *edit: From the TT website, it seems it will fit a small DSLR with kit lens...*

    For me, I've used it with a Leica M6 with a 35mm Summicron ASPH with the rectangular hood on and a Ricoh GRD. There's space for 2 rolls of film on the side, but not much more. Without the point and shoot, about 6-8 rolls of film would fit in there.

    Compartments
    Like any usual camera bag, it comes with a main compartment where you can customize using velcro inserts. Like standard Think Tank products, it comes with more than you need. Mine sits in a shoebox except for a main divider. Inside the main compartment, there is a hidden pocket, where you can find the detachable rain cover. Its nice to find raincovers in something this small. I use that compartment to keep my pencils... comes in handy for taking down notes (manual EXIF) when still using film.

    Outside, there's a main flap that conceals a large pocket which is just big enough to store documents (passports come to mind) and light maps. The UD10 is low profile so it's not possible to squeeze too much in there. The flap closes with a really strong plastic buckle and secured with velcro. Nice touch. I keep my passport in there since its not possible to just lift the flap, and if someone tries to do it, the hidden buckle prevents any access. On the flap itself, there's a little zippered compartment to keep a couple pieces of paper. I keep my tickets (bus, train, entrance tickets, whatever) in there.

    At the back of the back is a name card holder, and a little cutout for passing belt systems through. Also doubles as a deep pocket although I find it too difficult to use since its tight.

    Built Quality
    I want to say that its similar to LowePro's bags in built quality, but I think the quality of the material is better on Think Tanks products. It better be since it costs more too. Ballastic nylon all over so it looks like my other bags, but at least the logo are not that flashy.

    Conclusion
    I like it. This bag is small, functional (if it fits your arsenal) and very very well thought out. I've not used the rain cover yet, but its there when I need. There are pockets a plenty, and the zips are plastic so it doesn't scratch the camera when I take it out.

    I feel that if you are using largish SLRs (any of the new DSLRs fit in this profile, except maybe D40 class SLRs) or plan to have a zoom lens attach, the UD10 might be a little stretching it. Better to test it out in the shop before committing to one. A UD20 might be a better choice. But for digital point and shoot and rangefinder users, its a perfect getaway bag.
    Last edited by brian; 10th December 2007 at 07:56 PM.

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Item Reviewed: Large Lens Drop In

    Why?

    It fits WA lenses with their hood fitted on. That only is enough reason.

    What fits in it?

    Currently a Nikkor 17-35/2.8 resides in mine, but there is still space inside to throw in cleaning cloth, mine is a big piece. and maybe a mini blower with room to spare. That would give you an idea of the spaciousness of the pouch. For emergency use, I did tried putting my AFS80-200/2.8 in there as well, no hood. Half of the lens would be exposed but with the drawstring, it can hold it quite steady.

    Compartments

    1 single large compartment, rain cover at the bottom. Top is microfibre cloth type drawstring cover so it is splash proof to a limited amount.

    Built Quality

    Not sure how long the top cover portion will withstand constant abrasion but so far it does not lose out to Lowepro.

    Conclusion

    It is a very usefull pouch since it does not bulge out like a lot of Lowepro`s lens pouches. You can flatten it if you want to. My only concern is that if the drawstring is not loosened totally, the stretchable microfibre cloth can hamper the insertion and extraction of your lens. Especially when you are putting the lens with the hood on, front first, the edge of the of the hood can catch onto the elastic material. Other than that, it is a good pouch to use and should have 2 in the least.

    Current setup - Pro Speed Belt, Chimp Cage, Lightning Fast and Large Lens Drop in.

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Item Reviewed: Lightning Fast

    Why?

    For Flash or to store miscellaneous items.

    What fits in it?

    So far is has fitted an SB800, with a cooler master HDD casing and 1 set of extra batteries at the same time. Or 1 PSP with logitech casing with space for others.

    Compartments

    1 single large compartment with 1 pocket inside for rain cover/small items; memory cards or batteries. Outside has 1 zippered pocket for small items too.

    Built Quality

    Not sure how long the top cover portion will withstand constant abrasion but so far it does not lose out to Lowepro.

    Conclusion

    Used primarily for flashes, it can double as to hold miscellaneous items. Blower, memory cards, extra batteries etc etc. It has a pretty thin profile and not easily out of shape so it is also good for bringing it out on a normal day.

    Current setup - Pro Speed Belt, Chimp Cage, Lightning Fast and Large Lens Drop in.
    Last edited by TMC; 16th December 2007 at 11:23 PM.

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    TMC, the Lightning Fast does have the detachable rain cover. In fact, all TTP bags/backpacks/pouches have the rain cover, even my puny All The Other Stuffs.

    Can anyone owning the Glass Taxi please do a review? Judging from the posts of those have gotten or intend to get the backpack, it is a pretty popular item. A review will definitely help in spreading the BBB virus

  10. #10

    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Quote Originally Posted by Randius View Post
    TMC, the Lightning Fast does have the detachable rain cover. In fact, all TTP bags/backpacks/pouches have the rain cover, even my puny All The Other Stuffs.

    Can anyone owning the Glass Taxi please do a review? Judging from the posts of those have gotten or intend to get the backpack, it is a pretty popular item. A review will definitely help in spreading the BBB virus
    Yeap my Lighting Fast also have the rain cover, even the smallest Modulus Pouch comes with a rain cover
    Last edited by airfins; 15th December 2007 at 07:23 AM.
    Canon 30D, G11, 50 f1.8II, 10-22 f3.5-4.5, 24-70 f2.8L, 70-200 f2.8L IS, EX580II

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Sorry, I forgot that I removed all the rain covers from my bags as they are in the way.

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Item Reviewed: Pro Speed Belt

    Why?

    Because it is the only other common alternative besides the Lowepro

    What fits in it?

    Modulus Pouches, Lowepro pouches. But the lowepro will be more prone to wild swings due to its considerable thinner straps.

    Compartments

    None

    Built Quality

    So far questionable. It is more comfortable but then it has stretched a bit on me since. According to some, it is due to the padding getting compressed thus making the already fit looser or I might just have lost weight. In any case, this is a point to take note. I did not have the problem with the lowepro belt tho. Frequent shifting of the pouches WILL cause abrasion on the material of the belt, mine is already quite prominent.

    Conclusion

    It is a better alternative to the lowepro and more comfortable. The only drawback is the small loops sewed on the belt and for that price, should have better material. For that price, I would expect something more abrasion resistant and stretch resistant.

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Quote Originally Posted by TMC View Post
    Sorry, I forgot that I removed all the rain covers from my bags as they are in the way.
    This is evident especially in the smaller pouches such as All The Other Stuffs and Modulous Pouch. The rain cover takes up a significant amouunt of space which can be put to better use.

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Item Reviewed: Pixel Pocket Rocket

    Brief Analysis: This crazily small, tiny, compact wallet looking thingumwidget actually holds a lot (10!!!) of CF cards.

    I got this free with my Speed Freak beltpack, and the day I fill it up fully with memory cards, I know I've gone wrong somewhere up there.

    The best thing about it is that it's really small and unobtrusive. Obviously, when filled with memory cards, it will not be so flat and compact, but still, size-wise, it's very manageable.

    The only complaint I have is that I wish it were somehow also modular, such that it can be attached to the accessory rails on either side of the Speed Freak, or to a Modulus Belt.

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Item Reviewed: Think Tank Speed Freak Beltpack

    Introduction
    I purchased this from TK Foto at S$179 (including GST). It's a wonderful beltpack, with a lot of "hidden" compartments for slotting in stuff you always wanted to put in your camera bag, but had no space for most of the time, such as the body cap, lens pen, lens caps (when shooting events) etc.

    Freebies (Items that came together with it)
    The Speed Freak came with the usual seamless raincoat (which I didn't use during the trip to Aussie - the Speed Freak's field test), a Pixel Pocket Rocket (wrote a small separate review for this already) and the Accelerator Shoulder Strap. As with all other Think Tank Products, build quality on the accessories are great too.

    Build Quality
    The build of Speed Freak is excellent - no fraying threads, no missed stitches. I was particularly impressed with the sturdiness of the waist belt. The whole bag looks and feels like it will protect my stuff.

    Interior
    The Speed Freak, like all other TT products, came with a generous amount of internal dividers. There were two main tall and broad dividers, and four shorter, slimmer ones.

    I was, however, unimpressed by the sturdiness of these dividers, as they felt very flimsy and gave way far too easily. Hence, I added some dividers from my Airport Antidote to make the whole thing more padded and sturdy.

    The front zippered pocket has several slots for storing pen, cards, and other assortment of stuffs and there is a blue-coloured strap for attaching the Pixel Pocket Rocket, included as a freebie. I even managed to stuff a blower in for the duration of the trip. In front of that main front zipper pocket, there is a smaller front pocket, also zippered. This is where I stored my CPL (in a case), extra batteries for the flash and camera.

    Exterior
    The Speed Freak has a multitude of side pockets (4 of them). Two are netting pockets with stretchable drawstring closure, and two more standard stretch pockets, inside of these netting pockets. The inside pockets are slightly taller.

    There is a carrying handle, just above the front zippered pocket, which I found very helpful. Grabbing that handle, I could easily rotate the beltpack from back to front of my body, and vice versa.

    On the waistbelt (it's a beltpack, remember?) there is a modulus rail for attaching accessory pouches. Four loops on each side allow you to lock a maximum of four modulus pouches on each side. There is also a carabiner loop near where the waistbelt joins the bag, on both sides of the waistbelt, so you can attach other stuff that you would attach with a carabiner.

    On the whole, the belt is very comfortable, and does not "cut in" to your hips. It is very wide, and though it is not thickly-padded, it still feels okay.

    The accelerator shoulder strap was a welcome comfort, especially when you're on your feet for more than an hour. The concentrated weight hanging off one part of your hips does get strenuous after awhile, so the strap helps to relief it. It is well-padded and allows you to rotate the beltpack to the front and back of you without having to touch the strap.

    Configuration
    For the duration of the trip, I had with me a 30D with grip, a Sigma 10-20, a Canon 50mm f/1.8, a Canon 24-85mm and a 580EX. I also had a spare battery for the 30D, a set of spare AAs for the 580EX, and a 77mm CPL.

    I also carried a 600ml water bottle, my iPod and Westone UM1 in-ear monitors, a pair of sunglasses, two pens, a lenspen, and a blower.

    The main compartment is partitioned such that I can fit my 30D with 10-20, facing down. The 50mm then goes into another partition, with the 580EX at the extreme end of the pack. The 24-85 is attached via a Lowepro Sliplock case (intended for a flash, but nevertheless put to good use) on the Modulus rail.

    The iPod and UM1s went into the standard stretch pocket off to one side, concealed from prying eyes. The sunglasses went into the netting pocket on the other side of the bag. The water bottle hung from a carabiner, which was attached to the waist belt, where there are carabiner loops.

    All the small stuff, except the extra batteries and CPL went into the main front zippered pocket, while the batteries and CPL went into a smaller front pocket, also zippered.

    I brought the whole beltpack onboard as carry-on luggage, without any questions asked. It safely fits within the size limits. Weight, however, would depend on what you're carrying in it. AFAIK, the international weight limit for carry-on luggage is 7kg.

    Conclusion
    The Speed Freak is able to take on quite a large load and be an alternative to the modulus belt system. In particular, it allows the user to carry a camera with a lens attached, impossible with the belt system.

    I will consider actually using this for events coverage in the future.

    Will add photos on another day. Still very tired out from Aussie.

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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    time to add my 2-kopeks...

    Item Reviewed: The Glass Taxi

    Introduction:
    Purchased this earlier this week as an alternative to the Lowepro Mini-Trekker. I was looking for something that is lighter and more compact for event shooting. The price is $209.

    Freebies (Items that came together with it)
    Raincover and 2 straps for securing ur tripod/monopod to the side of the bag.

    Build Quality
    Made of tough ballistic nylon. It was raining last nite when I was walking to the event location. The raindrops rolls off the bag. The bag probably can withstand some light rain... just dun expect it to survive a hurricane. The straps a tad thin for my liking. However, once I pulled it tight, the bag hugs the body and makes carrying very comfortable.

    Interior
    As advertised, this bag can hold those giant lenses like the Nikon AFS 200mm/f2 VR. My AFS 70-200 VR is lost among the bag. It can comfortably hold my D300+grip, a SB800, a SD-8a and my AFS 17-35/f2.8 lens. Spare CF cards and my Expodisc go into the mesh bag inside the bag. The paddings inside is thick and a lens well at the bottom of the bag holds your long lenses in place, together with a protective collar. Very thoughtful design.

    What I didn't like was that the mesh bag's velcro strip doesn't go the entire length of the bag. Hence, your small items have a tendency to slip out of the bag. I discovered this when I was trying to hunt for my CF card. Also, for me, I have lots of odds and ends to carry around for a shoot. There's simply not enough small pockets/compartments to hold all these odds and ends. Probably, the designers were thinking that people will use this bag in conjunction with the TT belt-system. However, there are times that users don't wear (or have) the belt-system.

    Exterior
    There are loops along the sides for your tripod/monopod. Apart from this, there's no other compartments or pockets. The loops are serious only meant for your tripods/monopods. I cannot loop one of the TT pouches (or a Lowepro pouch) on it to carry small items. Again, I wish they had included more pouches.

    Conclusion
    The Glass Taxi works as advertised - it carries your equipment from place to place comfortably and the bag is very inconspicuous. I left my bag side by side with some other haversacks, it doesn't look that out of place. The carrying straps are a tad thin for my liking but comfortable to use.

    What I would really like is for more pockets and compartments. Not everyone has a the TT belts nor use one with the Taxi. For me who likes to carry a lot of odds and ends, probably you will need a bigger bag.
    If Life worked on auto mode then manual mode for photography would have never existed. ― Deeksha Mittal

  17. #17

    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Item Reviewed Think Tank Change Up


    Items in Package
    As Randius' previous review, items that came with the Change-Up were the same. An assortment of dividers, two shoulder (chest harness) straps and a rain-cover.

    Build Quality
    The build of CU feels better than the Lowepros I have.

    Internal
    Although it came with an internal "bucket" I removed it to allow more storage space and was pleasantly surprised that even without that "bucket" there was sufficient protection. However i did feel the dividers are abit too thin and flimsy but no big complaint there.

    External
    The odds and ends went into the front zippered pocket and the stretchable side pockets. There is also a rear zippered and a rear open pocket at the back of the main compartment.

    Although the CU looks small and indiscrete from the outside, it can take quite a lot of gear. I didn't really like the shoulder straps as I could feel them eating a bit into my shoulder. however, no problems when using them with the belt.

    Test Configurations
    When i travelled up to Mersing, i carried the CU with the following equipment, with the inner bucket removed (edit: 29/12).

    5D w/o grip
    24-70 w/ hood reversed
    70-200 f2.8 IS w/o hood
    580EX2

    These all went into the main compartment. i was impressed! the items fitted snugly but not clashing into each other.

    The remainder of my gear, like batteries (for cam and flash) went into the front stretchable pockets. Cf cards, lens pen, ipod shuffle went into the zippered front pocket and my bounce card and pen went into the rear open pocket.

    Also i carried the CU slightly differently than from the website as i am of smaller built and can't carry it ard my front. So i use the shoulder strap and carry it like a shoulder bag most of the time, using the beltpack when i have to move around a lot, but keeping it at my back.

    *Update*
    Used it for a wedding, carried the camera bodies and flashes in another bag, stuffed the CU with a 24-70 w/ hood, 100 macro, 70-200 w/o hood and used it as a lens change back. Swing to the front, change the lens, swing back. works very well.

    Conclusion
    The CU is an amazing beltpack which you can use as a shoulder bag easily. It will hold a lot of gear and is quite comfortable to bring around. This will prob be my events bag in future too!
    Last edited by thingie; 29th January 2008 at 03:12 PM. Reason: add more info

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Singapore
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    3,304

    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    From the perspective of a user who also owns the Pro Speed Belt and other modules

    Item Reviewed: Glass Taxi

    Introduction:
    Purchased this from fellow bro Nightwolf after displaying much desperation in the TTP thread and also some dis-satisfaction with the Change Up during the recent Cambodia trip.

    Freebies
    Detachable raincover, 2 straps for securing tripod/monopod to the side of the bag and the Curved Comfort shoulder strap. Nightwolf missed the shoulder strap out in his review

    Build Quality
    The exterior looks tough and is made mostly out of tough ballistic nylon which can withstand light amount of rain or spill. Do use the rain cover for heavier rain. The two concealable shoulder straps are nicely padded for my liking but the durability of the joints with the backpack is a bit unconvincing.

    Interior
    The interior is heavily padded and so are the dividers. As with most Think Tank Photo products, the Glass Taxi comes with a generous amount of dividers which can be configured to your every need. As I do not own a lot of equipment, the Glass Taxi easily accommodate my D200, 18-200 with hood, 50/1.4 with KS-9 hood, SB-800, remote control and shutter release cables and filters. As I also own the Pro Speed Belt, extra batteries and CF cards go into the Speed Changer. The foam ring sitting at the bottom of the backpack is very useful for holding longer lenses such as the 300/2.8 in place with the help of a foam collar.

    The complaints are about the same as reported by Nightwolf. The velcro stripe should extend to the entire length of the mesh pocket's opening to prevent small items from falling out. This can be easily solved by getting the belt system but not everyone will favour this approach. There should be more small pockets and compartments for storage of miscellaneous items.

    Exterior
    There are two stretchable pockets on each side for either inserting the leg(s) of a monopod/tripod or putting small water bottle. There are also loops along the sides to attach the straps for securing tripod/monopod. Apart from the these loops, there are hardly any modulus loops for attaching belt modules onto the Glass Taxi itself.

    Conclusion
    The Glass Taxi is a very versatile backpack due to its spacious interior, the generous amount of dividers and the possibility of attaching the Pro Speed Belt to increase its capacity. It is a pretty compact backpack for transporting your equipment to the location and putting the often-used items in the modules on the attached Speed Belt for faster and easier access. The improvements I can see for the Glass Taxi will be modulus loops for attaching belt modules directly onto the Glass Taxi and longer velcro stripe for the internal mesh pocket.

  19. #19

    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Item Reviewed: Bum Bag
    Introduction:
    Got this free when I ordered R360. Bum bag turns out to be very useful.

    Freebies
    Detachable raincover.

    Build Quality
    Looks like it can take abit of rain. Build quality is normal, looks tough. might be able to take some abuse.

    Interior
    Interior is thin but tough, this is where the beauty lies. If i'm out with R360, I can put my laundry inside (1 t-shirt, shorts and towel), for events/weddings (50mm/1.8, wallet, hp(n73), extra batt, lens blower, lenspen, raynox dcr250, 4 AA batts, 2 sd cards). It can swallow all those things without looking bulky.

    Protection might not be as good as other bags, but it serves its purpose. So far, my 50mm has remained unscathed.

    Exterior
    1 zipper pocket in front. It has got webbing shoulder strap attachments that you can attach any straps to it. Can attach to any modulus belt. Has got a top handle too.


    Conclusion
    If Bum bag is not named Bum Bag, it should be named "all the other stuff" instead :P. It sure can take in alot of things. No regrets getting this bag.

  20. #20
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    Sep 2004
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    Default Re: [ThinkTank Photo Bags] Reviews and User Comments

    Item Reviewed: Skin Double Wide

    Introduction:
    A scaled down series from the modulus, the skin is meant for cameramen that requires a light and slim system to carry their equipment around. A first glance shows that it would look similar to other brands like newswear but features a better material and versatility.
    The Skin series can be used with other Think Tank Products such as the pro speed belt, belly dancer harness or mix and match with the modulus system to adhere to individual preferences.

    The Double Wide is the single largest item in the Sklin series and is meant to hold a variety of lenses and equipment.

    Freebies:
    Detachable raincover.

    Build Quality:
    Looks like it can take abit of rain. Build quality is normal, looks tough. might be able to take some abuse.

    Interior:
    Protection might not be as good as other bags but it was not meant to be top priority for this series. Padding is at a bare minimal with only 1 padding for each lens pouch.

    Conclusion:
    DW is good for those that like to go with minimal equipment. In all, it can hold a 70-200, 24-70 and a 17-35 with 2 flashes and other miscellaneous items, at once. When combined with the chimp cage(or 2), you can be equipped for most occasions and still not to worry about your bags.

    Minus points would be the tendency to overstuff the DW and be overladen at the waist.

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