Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 29 of 29

Thread: How to check for dirt and dust on a DSLR Sensor

  1. #21

    Default Re: How to check for dirt and dust on a DSLR Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by ceecookie View Post
    One say good,One say bad.
    Can moderator give the final say if this is necessary?
    will u not buy a camera because of a dirty sensor that can be cleaned for less than 30 bucks? then u have your answer already.

  2. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    156

    Default Re: How to check for dirt and dust on a DSLR Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by ceecookie View Post
    One say good,One say bad.
    Can moderator give the final say if this is necessary?

    To check or not to check will be totally up to you to decide. You are the one who will be paying for the item you wish to purchase.

    Sensor cleaning service(about $30?) is avaliable from Canon service center. Sensor replacement/repair ($xxx ? if cleaning does not remove the contaminants) is also available.

    Based on my past experience, i say do it. Anyway, it is not something difficult. But you still can choose to do otherwise.

    Do whatever you think is beneficial to you.
    You do not need someone else to dictate for you.


    Caveat Emptor.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Life is a result of your choices, yes, sometimes you also encounter "no choice" situation, but most of the time, you have choices. You can choose to ignore or you can choose to take action - some of these choices gives you happiness, some gives you frustration. What would you like to be today? to be happy or frustrated? You are the master of your life, you make the choice....

  3. #23

    Default Re: How to check for dirt and dust on a DSLR Sensor

    Here's to put an end to this argument.

    I believe good forum site is moderated properly, that is, if such post seem to be of no use simply because there's a lot of similar threads on that topic, then a moderator (or long-time member alike) can either close the thread or just inform those who joined the thread to refer to a long list of similar topic instead (which I noticed presented in another box at the end of each topic). Now is this difficult to understand?

    I have high respect to this clubsnap, and I believe some debate would be necessary to make the topic "more" interesting and more "importantly" informative. Meaning, a mature forumer knows when to start a debate and when to share something that would be beneficial to everyone reading (or just passing through this site). I would have left such rant if it was an attack regarding something "worth debating", like an argument on how good a certain lens is, for example - where we can speak freely based on our experience. But this topic is rather informative than subject for ranting. Nonetheless, as everyone would agree, we are entitled to our own opinion. But let me just add to that that we should put such opinion in a proper ocassion. I have no intention, or whatsoever, to strike the person personally.. I just simply find his feedback offensive than informative.

    You see some newbies here find this post to be helpful, meaning in one way or another, some can benefit from this while others will just find this as fyi.

    You said to yourself.. "i am frankly, very sick and tired of always being told to be more mature" have you ask yourself why? This is where CS come into play.

    If you want people to respect your post you need to earn that respect. If you still find this feedback unconstructive, then you have a problem mate.

    Apologies to anyone who reads this post (both new members and old timers). Hopefully this should end this argument, and we can expect succeeding post will just be related to this topic - that is, if anyone still feel the need to share some more valuable info related to the Thread Topic.

    Ciao! =)

  4. #24

    Default Re: How to check for dirt and dust on a DSLR Sensor

    i think its time to get my sensor cleaned
    did the test which bartman posted, and found no less than 33 specs of dirt on my pic (or course some were negligible until i viewed it at 100%) but i never noticed this from my normal usage

    any1 noes how much it will cost to get it cleaned and where? its a d70s (NSC i think)

    anyway, to ts: very useful info u posted there; i was trying to check for dirt on my sensor and had little sucess until i read ur thread

  5. #25

    Default Re: How to check for dirt and dust on a DSLR Sensor

    yeaa i said it before and i'll say it again. I really appreciate the fact that you bothered to post something like this up. It's may not be big but at least it gives us anal beings a chance to be really anal with our camera hahahah.

    and yes, the internet is jammed full of information. Heck you might even find info on assembling your own DSLR and make it work like a EOS 1D. But little actions of spreading the word help advocate non-commonplace information and educate those who are new at this. Take me for example. I'm going to look at sensors more fervently when I'm shopping for 2nd Hand DSLR's now. buahaha. Anal me.

  6. #26

    Default Re: How to check for dirt and dust on a DSLR Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by 2.8photography View Post
    i think its time to get my sensor cleaned
    did the test which bartman posted, and found no less than 33 specs of dirt on my pic (or course some were negligible until i viewed it at 100%) but i never noticed this from my normal usage

    any1 noes how much it will cost to get it cleaned and where? its a d70s (NSC i think)

    anyway, to ts: very useful info u posted there; i was trying to check for dirt on my sensor and had little sucess until i read ur thread
    do a search, do a search, there are only at least 80 people who have asked about cleaning their sensors at NSC before

    and my advice, as always again, will be that you learn how to DIY, saves you the trouble of going down to a certain place all the time, and cheaper in the long run too.

    as to how to diy, search the forums too, a quick search with words "sensor cleaning" reveals only 5+ threads within the past 3 months, i am always amused by our resourcefulness and big talk about how a forum is meant for exchange of information when nothing seems to ever sink in.

    cleaning nikon d80 question thread
    cleaning pentax dslr question thread
    cleaning eos 5d guide thread
    spotted picture thread
    YET another spotted picture thread
    how to clean d40 oh please oh please thread
    sensor cleaning experience thread
    link to youtube video on sensor cleaning thread
    confused lens vignetting with sensor dust thread

    the thread you probablywant to look at for your question. if you find that that thread does not seem to help (even though it does), there also this other thread
    it's all there, so i don't understand, really, just proves my point, took me less than 2 minutes INCLUDING copying and pasting the urls, and i did 2 separate searches too.
    do you eventually get your answer in either way? yes. in which do you learn to be an independent learner? you decide.
    Last edited by night86mare; 14th November 2007 at 05:55 PM.

  7. #27
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    ClubSNAP community
    Posts
    2,775

    Default Re: How to check for dirt and dust on a DSLR Sensor

    Add http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=274420 for tools for cleaning sensors to Night86mare's list.

    Post #32 actually lists the steps too.

    However, do handle with care nonetheless.... there has been a case I know of someone leaving behind a scratch, despite using the correct sensor swabs.

  8. #28

    Default Re: How to check for dirt and dust on a DSLR Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by bartman View Post
    I think it is wiser to check then not to check it at all. I have personally encounter "bad" ones before. It does not really matter what the contaminants might be or look like. If you manage to find one, will you still accept the camera?
    But you can still choose to do want you think is right for you... To check or not to check, you make the choice.

    Caveat Emptor.






    Before i spent the time to create and type out this thread, i somehow knew it must have been posted many times over before somewhere, but i still choose to post my version of it.

    The origin of this posting is a result of my past experience. I hope by sharing my past experience, i can create awareness to those who are new to this or not aware of what is going on to benefit and gain something out from it no matter how many times this subject have been provided before here or anywhere else. That is my intention of this thread.


    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Life is a result of your choices, yes, sometimes you also encounter "no choice" situation, but most of the time, you have choices. You can choose to ignore or you can choose to take action - some of these choices gives you happiness, some gives you frustration. What would you like to be today? to be happy or frustrated? You are the master of your life, you make the choice....
    It's not about checking, or not checking.

    My point is that this check is not helpful for determining whether the sensor is scratched / contaminated and should not be performed as no conclusions can be drawn from it.

    When you shoot at a small aperture and see some dust spots, or lines, you can't tell with 100% certainty if the spots or lines are: -

    1) due to contaminants / scratches that cannot be cleaned away;
    2) normal hair/dust that can be cleaned away.

    It's not about buying a camera with one or two spots or buying a camera with 20 or 30 spots.

    The point is that the camera with one or two spots may have been wet cleaned, and these one or two remaining spots are contaminants. There's just no way to tell, and there's no point conducting this test FOR THE PURPOSE OF BUYING A SECOND HAND DSLR. Or even buying a brand new DSLR.

    The sure-fire way to tell is to wet clean the camera, AND perform your test. I'm pretty sure the seller of the 2nd hand DSLR will not permit that.
    Last edited by kongping; 14th November 2007 at 11:37 PM.

  9. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    156

    Default Re: How to check for dirt and dust on a DSLR Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by kongping View Post

    The sure-fire way to tell is to wet clean the camera, AND perform your test. I'm pretty sure the seller of the 2nd hand DSLR will not permit that.
    You are absolutely right about this one...


    The aim of checking(i am referring to used ones only) is not really to find a camera with flawless sensors. It is more to identify the potential risk that you might need to face. DSLR after certain amount of time of regular usage will bound to have some level of dust accumulation on the sensor no matter how careful the user might be. Being able to see a estimated test result is better then nothing at all. If you happen to detect really odd looking contaminates, wouldn't it be safer to reject the camera then taking on the risk of accepting it? What if it turns out to be scratches? That means the camera need to be repaired instead of just getting a simple cleaning. You do not want to be in this situation........trust me, you don't....

    But to be fair, you will need to see a few samples with different levels of contaminations in order to judge and derive your acceptable "level". Some levels might be negligible, some, are totally unacceptable. Go search around in the internet where test where done by others. The test results will give you a rough idea of what to expect.


    But at the end of the day, there will still be those who still think checking is absolutely unnecessary or it is just a waste of effort. Well, do whatever you think is beneficial to you.

    This thread is created just for the purpose of creating awareness for those who are not aware of how to check for dust on DSLR sensor or those who don't even know what sensor checking is. I have no intention of trying to ask others to dictate what i had done.


    To check or not to check, the choice is totally yours......you decide.


    Caveat Emptor.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Life is a result of your choices, yes, sometimes you also encounter "no choice" situation, but most of the time, you have choices. You can choose to ignore or you can choose to take action - some of these choices gives you happiness, some gives you frustration. What would you like to be today? to be happy or frustrated? You are the master of your life, you make the choice....
    Last edited by bartman; 15th November 2007 at 09:06 AM.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •