Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 67

Thread: B&W Conversion

  1. #21

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    OK, thanks.

  2. #22

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Dream Merchant View Post
    I searched giclee here before, and another person asked about it in 2004 in CS. No one replied, and we digital newbies have no idea where to turn to to learn...
    Giclee is just a 'spiced-up' term for inkjet prints. For two years, I was cranking out giclee prints with an Epson 9000 but stopped doing it because of the extremely high running costs and maintenances. Now I just FTP my digital files to Infinite Editions in Colorado, USA (they are one of the best in this business). They will print my images and FedEx them to me within a week. It costs me about S$38 to print a 16"x20" B&W image.
    Last edited by photobum; 28th October 2007 at 12:42 AM.

  3. #23

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    WOW! S$38 for a 16x20 plus FedEx sound cheap! Or was it US$38? If it's SGD, I'm going to explore that option.

  4. #24

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Dream Merchant View Post
    WOW! S$38 for a 16x20 plus FedEx sound cheap! Or was it US$38? If it's SGD, I'm going to explore that option.
    Yes.... you read it right! It is 38 Singapore Dollars (US$24). Shipping is cheap if I print more than 10 images. This is even cheaper than buying inkset and papers from Cathay Photo and print with my Epson R2400.

    Anyway, Infinite Editions uses Hahnemuhle 316g Photo Rag Duo or 310g German Etching papers and Jon Cone Piezograph (Neutral, Platinum, Selenium or Sepia) K7 & K6 inksets.

    Keep in mind that their so-called platinum, sepia or selenium inksets are still not the same as real platinum, sepia or selenium-toned fiber-based prints.
    Last edited by photobum; 28th October 2007 at 01:07 AM.

  5. #25

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Once again, thanks Photobum!

    This is great news for those wanting very high-quality B&W prints!

  6. #26

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Dream Merchant View Post
    Once again, thanks Photobum!

    This is great news for those wanting very high-quality B&W prints!
    You are welcomed!

    For someone like me who have lived in the US for 12 years, I know where to source for the best printers. By the way, I am a true-blue Singaporean.

    For Photoshop B&W conversion, I go by feeling and mood. I don't specifically stick to one or two techniques. I will try a few methods and decide later what looks best for me. I treat each image differently.
    Last edited by photobum; 28th October 2007 at 01:36 AM.

  7. #27

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Sorry for OTing. For those of you who missed the old Portriga Rapid paper, you can try Bergger warm tone Prestige from www.bergger.com.

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,256

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    there are actually a few commonly used procedures to generate a monochrome image, but its very hard to get the b/w quality of real b/w film/prints

    there's a popular method that works with using the lab-color method but this results in a picture being too faded (layer has to be duplicated and multiplied)

    another way is to select monochrome under the channel mixer. adjust the RGB bars individually with preview till desired.

    there is a gradient map method and a calculation method but i'm not familiar with them
    chezburgr i can haz?

  9. #29
    Senior Member creampuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dover
    Posts
    5,116

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Somehow this thread wandered off towards B&W printing...

    Well there are several methods to do B&W conversion that I know using Photoshop.
    I'll share it here FREE for the benefit of all.

    1) Method 1: Grayscale
    Image>Mode>Greyscale

    One of the simplest ways to achieve a B&W image. Little control and usually needs to be tweaked with other tools for better contrast but noise levels isn't too bad. Much better than desaturating by Image>Adjustments>Hue/Saturation or Image>Adjustments>Desaturate

    2) Method 2: Channel Mixer
    Image>Adjustments>Channel Mixer or
    New Adjustment Layer>Channel Mixer

    Probably the most common and popular hands-on method. With the dialogue box open select the monochrome box on bottom left. Adjust the red, green and blue sliders. Move the sliders right to brighten the particular channel and left to darken them. This method can mimic the effect of traditional B&W filters on film very well.

    3) Method 3: Lab Colour or Lightness Channel
    Image>Lab Mode.
    Then bring up the Channels window visible on the right. Window>Channels. Click on the Lightness Channel to make it active. Then go to Image>Greyscale. Photoshop will prompt to ask if you want to discard the other channels. Click OK and you are left with a grey channel. At this stage you usually find an image that has very smooth tonality but flat. The next step will fix that.

    Duplicate the layer (Command-J on Mac/Ctrl-J on PC). In the Layers window, click on the new layer and change the Blend mode to Screen (to lighten it) or Multiply (to darken it). Next adjust the opacity of the layer using the slider to your preference. Flatten and save.

    4) Method 4: Calculations Method
    Image>Calculations

    In essence this method combines 2 channels to produce a new greyscale image. In the default setting, the dialogue box lists out the Red channel in Source 1 and the Red channel in Source 2. You will need to change one of the channels from either Source 1 or Source 2 to anything other than Red, usually Green or Blue.

    Your next step is to select the Blend mode. The default is Multiply (which darkens) or you can switch to Overlay. Adjust the Opacity setting to your preference. Once you're satisfied, you can then click on the Result pull down menu at the bottom. Select New Document. Click OK, then go to Mode>Greyscale.

    5) Method 5: Gradient Map
    Press D on the keyboard to make the default colour Black/White
    Image>Adjustments>Gradient Map or better
    New Adjustment Layer>Gradient Map

    In this method as the name suggests, you're mapping a black and white gradient over a coloured image. Very quick and simple but control can be limited. If you use an adjustment layer you can also desaturate the coloured background layer.

    Please go and experiment the above methods and find your preferred one. Cheers.
    Last edited by creampuff; 28th October 2007 at 10:17 AM. Reason: typo

  10. #30
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Turn Right in the Round about
    Posts
    459

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Hey Guys!!! This is great! its a good stepping stone for those especially newbies who wishes do B&W images. Thanks all for your contributions, appreciate it lots!!!

    I suggest the mods make this thread sticky for the benefit of others! what say you ??
    ...seeking angles in a new definition...
    SG 1st Malay Photog Forum | My Works

  11. #31
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    1,084

    Default Re: B&W Conversion


  12. #32

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    wow! thanks for the info!
    Trust me, I'm not so bad! | TangShooters

  13. #33

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by photobum View Post
    I read only books from Ansel Adams, John Sexton, Michael Kenna and Art Ross.
    A clarification please.

    Were you referring to Alan Ross?

  14. #34
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Katong, East Coast, Singapore
    Posts
    158

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Google for Greg Gorman Actions and Daniel Diaz actions, both give lovely results. For customization, you might want to record the actions yourself. =)
    Photography -- a new language of mind.

  15. #35
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    1,084

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    I know this is a little OT, but one important thing about digital B&W is you usually can't shoot the same way you shoot color... You have to have basic knowledge of zoning, otherwise, your seemingly OK colored photo will look bland if converted.

    Here's one more for your reference, hope you like it.

    http://www.blackandwhitedigital.com/...arliament.html

  16. #36

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Actually, I think B&W printing has a lot to do with B&W conversions because it's one of those areas that have to be carefully considered even before the image is created, be it in film based photography or even digital based.

    All the more so because we digitallers do not have the benefit of traditional B&W printing options, so we have to shoot and create files that will work to give at least acceptable results with digital-viable printing options only.

    Photobum, begger papers like toe warm-tone ones are silver-halide fiber-based papers. I don't think they can be used for digital printing right? Man, imagine if somehow they come out with a digital printer that can handle traditional silver-halide fiber-based paper!

  17. #37
    Senior Member creampuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dover
    Posts
    5,116

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by theveed View Post
    I know this is a little OT, but one important thing about digital B&W is you usually can't shoot the same way you shoot color... You have to have basic knowledge of zoning, otherwise, your seemingly OK colored photo will look bland if converted.

    Here's one more for your reference, hope you like it.

    http://www.blackandwhitedigital.com/...arliament.html
    Ha, Ha, really? I learnt the Zone System many years back and while it does give a good foundation, I would argue it isn't absolutely necessary as one can extensively manipulate digitally in Photoshop. If anything, a bland coloured photo can be the basis of a fine B&W image, like here http://forums.clubsnap.com/showthread.php?t=318086

  18. #38
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    1,084

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    What's with the "haha" thing?

    Some people have very little posting courtesy here.

    My suggestion wasn't invalid, yes it's true that that's not the only thing you need to know, but not everybody is "as good" as your knowledge of zoning and other technical knowledge. People here are just offering tips for the TS for reference, what's the beef? Did I say "you can't get a good B&W photo even in PP if you don't know zoning etc.?"

    Such arrogance

  19. #39

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    zone system is useful for capture as a good basis for what you can then work on in photoshop... the ol' turn of phrase springs to mind: "rubbish in, rubbish out"

    giclee is just a pretentious name for high end ink jet print that is going out of fashion... the name is going out of fashion that is, not the printing...

    and of course, my method of conversion:

    try using 2 Hue/Saturation layers one on top of the other... top layer just desat, bottom layer adjust the lightness of the various colours... can bring out more contrast in the image, especially for such colourful images... adjust contrast with curves to taste...

    again (as I have suggested in previous threads on b/w conversion), such a thread should be made sticky so the wheel doesn't have to be re-invented everytime someone asks this question...

  20. #40
    Senior Member creampuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dover
    Posts
    5,116

    Default Re: B&W Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by theveed View Post
    What's with the "haha" thing?

    Some people have very little posting courtesy here.

    My suggestion wasn't invalid, yes it's true that that's not the only thing you need to know, but not everybody is "as good" as your knowledge of zoning and other technical knowledge. People here are just offering tips for the TS for reference, what's the beef? Did I say "you can't get a good B&W photo even in PP if you don't know zoning etc.?"

    Such arrogance
    Wah so sensitive eh? Please I don't know where you got the idea of supposed arrogance on my part. My response relates to your earlier statement

    Quote Originally Posted by theveed View Post
    ...one important thing about digital B&W is you usually can't shoot the same way you shoot color... You have to have basic knowledge of zoning, otherwise, your seemingly OK colored photo will look bland if converted.
    Honestly I have no idea what you're talking about, or are you just offering generic "tips".

    With a digital workflow, B&W images today are for the most part derived from color images where the fine tuning is done through software (digital darkroom). One doesn't need to know the Zone System to be able to produce a decent B&W image, merely an understanding of what the software for post processing is capable of. I don't dispute the merits of the Zone System and it's application. Good to know but certainly not a pre-requisite to produce a decent B&W image.

    I don't profess to know it all photographically and am willing to share what I know freely. However it is important to express with clarity, and I was merely pointing out that your statement isn't valid. Simple as that. If you feel aggrieved at my comments, let me apologise here.
    Last edited by creampuff; 28th October 2007 at 06:20 PM.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •