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Thread: Polarising filters

  1. #1

    Default Polarising filters

    Do u use a Polarising filters for indoor shooting?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by vokawala View Post
    Do u use a Polarising filters for indoor shooting?
    It can be used indoors or outdoors. If you know what a polarising filter does, just apply it whenever you need it, e.g. cutting reflections from a glass surface.

    BC

  3. #3

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    but it will cut down your exposure by around 2 stops .. so longer exposure ..

  4. #4

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by vokawala View Post
    Do u use a Polarising filters for indoor shooting?
    if you wish to increase contrast/saturation of colours in the picture indoors, the answer is no

    if you wish to use it to cut down reflection/glare from non-metallic reflective surfaces then possibly, given that you have the means to shoot properly when you require longer exposure time

  5. #5

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    I think for indoor, those colour filters like fluorescent lamps type is more appropriate...rite?

  6. #6

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by vokawala View Post
    I think for indoor, those colour filters like fluorescent lamps type is more appropriate...rite?
    Huh? what filter is that?

    What are you trying to achieve with the filter?

    BC

  7. #7

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Scaglietti View Post
    Huh? what filter is that?

    What are you trying to achieve with the filter?

    BC
    I happened to see something like dat here :
    http://www.hoyafilter.com/products/hoya/cf-01.html

  8. #8
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Hi vokawala
    The ones you referring to are non polarising colored filters.

    Ryan

  9. #9

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by vokawala View Post
    I happened to see something like dat here :
    http://www.hoyafilter.com/products/hoya/cf-01.html
    Colour correction filters is not needed for digital. It was meant for film to correct for different lighting temperation.

    In digital cameras, we simply adjust the white balance.

    BC

  10. #10

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    ic...I understand now~ Thanks guys!

  11. #11

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Scaglietti View Post
    Huh? what filter is that?

    What are you trying to achieve with the filter?

    BC
    Visit the Hoya website, it explains the various filters they have and what they are targetted at achieving.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    ts, you need to read up more about digital photography

    often i find that a lot of questions that i have, the answers are easily answered, if i put in enough effort

    of course if you cannot answer those questions yourself you are more than welcome to post them up, but otherwise, just firing shotgun questions for small small things can be exasperating for the people who are willing to help and expect a higher level of questioning rather than such fundamentals..

    cheers, anyhow, i hope you are not offended by my point of view
    Last edited by night86mare; 25th October 2007 at 06:25 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Scaglietti View Post
    Colour correction filters is not needed for digital. It was meant for film to correct for different lighting temperation.

    In digital cameras, we simply adjust the white balance.
    It still may be needed. "White balance" only allows an approximate correction (an accurate correction is mathematically impossible at this stage), and "colour temperature" is an extremely crude way to describe the spectral composition of light.

    Household fluorescent lamps are mercury lamps that emit mostly a few discrete wavelengths. The phosphor coating of the tube converts this somewhat to an acceptable colour, but the spectral lines of mercury are still very pronounced (notably a green line at 546 nm); you can see the discrete wavelengths if you look e.g. at the diffraction patterns of a CD in fluorescent light. In many cases, this results in colour reproduction that is extremely different from sunlight (common e.g. with wood tones), and the only way to substantially correct this is to attenuate the offending wavelengths before they reach the film/sensor. This is exactly what the fluorescent light filter does/is supposed to do.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by night86mare View Post
    ts, you need to read up more about digital photography

    often i find that a lot of questions that i have, the answers are easily answered, if i put in enough effort

    of course if you cannot answer those questions yourself you are more than welcome to post them up, but otherwise, just firing shotgun questions for small small things can be exasperating for the people who are willing to help and expect a higher level of questioning rather than such fundamentals..

    cheers, anyhow, i hope you are not offended by my point of view
    I did saw people using polarising filter for indoor shooting. Cos at the back of my mind, I thought that polarising filters are for outdoor...so I'm curious to find the facts.

    I did look up for the question I wanted to know...but failed to find it. Thats the reason why I started this thread. I'm OK with all C&C. I'll ask more "intelligent" questions next time. Anyway, its ok. Cheers!

  15. #15

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf View Post
    It still may be needed. "White balance" only allows an approximate correction (an accurate correction is mathematically impossible at this stage), and "colour temperature" is an extremely crude way to describe the spectral composition of light.

    Household fluorescent lamps are mercury lamps that emit mostly a few discrete wavelengths. The phosphor coating of the tube converts this somewhat to an acceptable colour, but the spectral lines of mercury are still very pronounced (notably a green line at 546 nm); you can see the discrete wavelengths if you look e.g. at the diffraction patterns of a CD in fluorescent light. In many cases, this results in colour reproduction that is extremely different from sunlight (common e.g. with wood tones), and the only way to substantially correct this is to attenuate the offending wavelengths before they reach the film/sensor. This is exactly what the fluorescent light filter does/is supposed to do.
    The WB adjustment is much more precise compared the the colour correction filter.


    BC

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Scaglietti View Post
    The WB adjustment is much more precise compared the the colour correction filter.
    With one exception, it is fundamentally possible (though tedious) to correct exactly using a filter. Using white balance, it is fundamentally impossible (but very convenient). For small corrections white balance is much more practical, but for serious situations like fluorescent lamps, you cannot get the colours to look the same as under sunlight. This is just another manifestation of metamerism.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    OT slightly:

    http://www.mediachance.com/digicam/filtersim.htm

    Just a handy and free little program that helps remove colour casts from your photos, it includes Warming, Cooling and Colour Correction filters.

    Its only 380kb in size and is very useful used in conjunction with photo editing, yes you can do it in many editing software programs but this is something specialized.

    What you actually get is a set of Kodak Wratten filters that have been in use for years in film photography. What this does is to simulate what the different colour filters do change a picture.

    Enjoy!

  18. #18

    Default Re: Polarising filters

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf View Post
    With one exception, it is fundamentally possible (though tedious) to correct exactly using a filter. Using white balance, it is fundamentally impossible (but very convenient). For small corrections white balance is much more practical, but for serious situations like fluorescent lamps, you cannot get the colours to look the same as under sunlight. This is just another manifestation of metamerism.
    filters correct by an invariable set amount, whereas by shooting RAW and adjusting white balance, it is possible to fine tune the colour to a very exact amount...

    I have personally never found an image shot in RAW with colour that cannot be adjusted in white balance that might have been corrected by filter... but all this is OT so sorry to TS and lets get back to polarising filter...
    Last edited by theRBK; 28th October 2007 at 03:18 PM.

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