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Thread: White Balance for Studio Shoot

  1. #1

    Default White Balance for Studio Shoot

    I used a D60 to do some shooting in a studio last week. Three strobe lights were used - two on the subject and one on the background. I set the white balance to Auto initially but noticed that there was some inconsistency in the skin tone of the subject - sometimes it was right on but sometimes it was too cool (too blue). I tried setting the WB to Flash but the result was terrible - the subject skin tone was way too warm (too yellowish/reddish). Is there something wrong the WB sensor in my camera?

    What should I do? Should I use the Customer WB instead (by taking a reference shot of a white piece of paper under the lighting conditions that I was going to use)?

    Your advice is appreciated. Thanks.

    FM

  2. #2
    Member chris_k's Avatar
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    Default White Balance

    If it is color critical:

    Shoot a GretagMacBeth Color Check DC and use the white and stop colors to calibrate


    If not:

    Then can use a thick art card White Paper (150gsm and above). Too thin and the background bleeds thru
    or
    Use a standard 18% Grey Card

  3. #3
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    I am curious about this also...

    Because the souce of illumination is a flash with probably unknown colour temperature, how can a custom WB be conducted?

    Does the D60 support a custom WB for flash exposures?

    On my CP995, it seems like it can only do custom WB under ambient light.
    As complexity rises, precise statements lose meaning and meaningful statements lose precision.

  4. #4
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    Heck, it's digital. Shoot, review, change, shoot, review, change, ....


    Regards
    CK

  5. #5
    Member chris_k's Avatar
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    Default White Balance

    Yep...

    The more advance models have a custom WB control setting. Some are more accurate than others.

    Each flash (even between similar brands/model) have different color temperatures. This happens because the flash bulb starts to discolor after a while. Inavoidable due to the heating up of the tube, environmental factors and old age.

    Custom WB sets the color temp of your camera to capture at a certain setting. The problem sets in when you have multiple flashes. To be precise you have to color correct all to a standard range. You get the idea...

    Now camera's allow you set the a precise color temperature (in kelvins). Even more accurate is to filter each light and measure with a color meter.

    Hope that helps.

  6. #6

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    Hi Chris

    What is the best way to do custom white balance using a piece of white paper or 18% grey card? Do I take a reference shot of the paper under flash and then use this shot to set the custom white balance?

    In fact, I tried this method last nite but the colours were way off (too green) so I set the WB to sunlight and the colours were okay.

    Roy, the D60 support customer WB for all lighting conditions.

    FM

  7. #7
    Member chris_k's Avatar
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    Default White Balance

    You need a very accurate white sheet. Many times your eyes only think its white. Can get heavier grammage ones from Art Shops.

    Better still use a 18% Grey card.

    Don't forget to change these cards every 90 days. Cardboard and fiber papers will discolor easily due to environment. Don't worry, even with the $400 ColorChecker's you have to change em' every 250days (i think) or so.

    and yes, you take a "PROPERLY AND ACCURATELY EXPOSED" shot with flash and do a custom white balance on it.

    And since all systems are different. Shoot the color spot samples and provide them to your designers or printers. With that they can very accurately determine what your color is suppose to be like.

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