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Thread: Drawing the line between life and photography

  1. #1
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    Default Drawing the line between life and photography

    Was wondering after seeing the photos and brought back the article i read about.

    the thread is posted here http://clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=310724

    If it were you, on in the shoes of kevin carter, what would u have done without hesitation, to snap or to save him?

    Is the responsiblity of portraying news greater or is another fragile life another burden you have to handle? What would you do?

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    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    wanted to discuss something similar before http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=292383 seems like no interest here though

    actually if you ask me, although you can't save every single suffering person in this world, i'll just say in mandarin 救一个算一个 and 量力而为

    sounds negative but, after awhile, i think all news pictures just become ''entertainment.''

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    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Quote Originally Posted by eikin View Post
    wanted to discuss something similar before http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=292383 seems like no interest here though

    actually if you ask me, although you can't save every single suffering person in this world, i'll just say in mandarin 救一个算一个 and 量力而为

    sounds negative but, after awhile, i think all news pictures just become ''entertainment.''
    i think the last sentence v saddening leh.. but after seeing the world press photo not entertaining but more enlightening?

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    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Quote Originally Posted by sprintist View Post
    i think the last sentence v saddening leh.. but after seeing the world press photo not entertaining but more enlightening?
    ooops ... ok lah, that was quite extreme, though i do think that they all ''degrade'' into ''entertainment'' given enough time. people get more and more numb with explosion of information, the shock effect just get worn off faster and faster, of course people still feel, but looking at the current state of world affairs, it's not very dim, but not very bright either

  5. #5

    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    There is absolutely no excuse for not saving that kid. Taking one or two shots requires only less than 30 seconds. I'll chop chop take two shots and take the kid with me to the next medical base. There is absolutely no clash between photography and moral values at that point in time.

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    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Quote Originally Posted by eikin View Post
    ooops ... ok lah, that was quite extreme, though i do think that they all ''degrade'' into ''entertainment'' given enough time. people get more and more numb with explosion of information, the shock effect just get worn off faster and faster, of course people still feel, but looking at the current state of world affairs, it's not very dim, but not very bright either
    yes i get what u mean, the effect does get worn off but then sometimes looking back again,it still refreshes memories. These photos are impactful enough to bring great news and even cause political issues.

    agreed with you leejay, perhaps there isn't any medical centre nearby. but still is it 'ethical' to shoot that boy already in such a pitiful state and plight? perhaps sometimes we just need to see the bigger picture, that photo needs to bring a statement to the world about poverty and suffering too yes?

  7. #7

    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Quote Originally Posted by sprintist View Post
    Was wondering after seeing the photos and brought back the article i read about.

    the thread is posted here http://clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=310724

    If it were you, on in the shoes of kevin carter, what would u have done without hesitation, to snap or to save him?

    Is the responsiblity of portraying news greater or is another fragile life another burden you have to handle? What would you do?
    Vultures don't eat live people.

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    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Quote Originally Posted by mattlock View Post
    Vultures don't eat live people.
    yeah it attacked the boy who died though.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    that isn't a boy.and the vulture didn't feed on the girl, and she didn't die from that situation
    hope you check the facts first in the future...it's abit unfair to this photographer
    ----------


    His picture of an emaciated girl collapsing on the way to a feeding centre, as a plump vulture lurked in the background, was published first in The New York Times and The Mail & Guardian, a Johannesburg weekly. The reaction to the picture was so strong that The New York Times published an unusual editor's note on the fate of the girl. Mr Carter said she resumed her trek to the feeding centre. He chased away the vulture.

    Afterwards, he told an interviewer, he sat under a tree for a long time, "smoking cigarettes and crying". His father, Mr Jimmy Carter laid last night: "Kevin always carried around the horror of the work he did." - The New York Times

    Source: Sydney Morning Herald Saturday 30 July 1994
    -----

  10. #10

    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Quote Originally Posted by sprintist View Post
    yes i get what u mean, the effect does get worn off but then sometimes looking back again,it still refreshes memories. These photos are impactful enough to bring great news and even cause political issues.

    agreed with you leejay, perhaps there isn't any medical centre nearby. but still is it 'ethical' to shoot that boy already in such a pitiful state and plight? perhaps sometimes we just need to see the bigger picture, that photo needs to bring a statement to the world about poverty and suffering too yes?
    Yep, this starved & shrunken child was crawling towards a UN Food camp a distance away. There will surely be some food and medical supplies. He could have just picked her up and gave her to the UN staff after his shot. Therefore, there is no excuse for not saving that kid. What's the use of chasing the vulture away? It would come back, right?

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Why not donate 50% of your pay so these children can have proper food and place to stay?

    We're worse then the photographer who was only doing his job, and telling the world of the plight thats happening else where. Because you are not doing anything at all, knowing that this is actually happening.

    It's traumatic enough to see something like that, having to bring up your camera to make sure the message is delivered takes a lot of courage. So we should not argue if he should have saved the girl or not. And take the message that he is trying to put through to us.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Walao, I never said he was wrong to take photos of that situation in the first place. He should! It was his job. But after taking photos, he had finished his job already, right? Instead of standing around and doing nothing, he should save the girl. Easy as that.

    Anyway, I am just standing on my own perspective. If I were him, I would take two quick shots and then take the girl to the food camp. If there are any people around, I wouldn't say anything, but at that time, it was just him and the kid.

    Let me give you a very good example of a photographer who took a solid shot and also saved a life.

    The woman who was captured in a photograph that came to define the Vietnam War had an emotional reunion in Newfoundland with the immigration officer who let her into Canada.

    Kim Phuc was just nine-years-old when she was photographed running naked and screaming on a road near Saigon in 1972, her skin burning from the napalm bombs dropped on her village.


    Kim Phuc embraces Murray Osmond, the immigration officer who processed her claim for political asylum in 1992.
    (CBC) The picture is credited for shaping the public's perception of the war worldwide.


    Twenty years after the photograph was taken, Phuc sought political asylum in Canada, defecting to the country as she and her husband flew home from their honeymoon in Moscow.

    Their airplane stopped to refuel in Gander, N.L. and Phuc and her husband asked to stay behind.

    Phuc had been living and studying in Cuba at the time, relocating there after being pulled from her school in Vietnam to appear in what are widely described as government propaganda films.

    On Wednesday, Phuc, who now lives in Toronto, flew back to Gander for the first time and met once more with Murray Osmond, the immigration officer who first handled her case in 1992.

    He greeted her Wednesday as she emerged from her airplane.

    Phuc said she remembers him well and was so thankful to have the opportunity to live in Canada.

    "I'll just never forget it," she said.

    Osmond said he in turn will never forget helping a woman who came to signify so much during the war.

    "This will be a highlight of my career for sure," he said. "It's just a nice feeling to know that you were part of a process that was able to help."

    Tells her story to audience in Gander
    After the reunion with Osmond, Phuc, who now runs a foundation in support of children around the world, delivered a speech to an audience at a hotel in Gander, describing the moment Associated Press photographer Nick Ut snapped the famous picture, which eventually won him a Pulitzer Prize.

    "He won a Pulitzer Prize and he had already won my heart," Phuc told the audience. "When he put down his camera, he rushed me to the nearest hospital. Uncle Ut saved my life."


    Phuc spent 14 months in a Saigon hospital Saigon recovering from third-degree burns covering half her body.

    Over the next 10 years, Phuc said the communist government subjected her to endless media interviews, supervised her daily, and forced her to quit school to appear in propaganda films.
    Last edited by leejay; 14th September 2007 at 09:26 AM. Reason: Source: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundland-labrador/story/2007/09/13/phuc-gander.html?ref=rss

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    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Quote Originally Posted by leejay View Post
    Yep, this starved & shrunken child was crawling towards a UN Food camp a distance away. There will surely be some food and medical supplies. He could have just picked her up and gave her to the UN staff after his shot. Therefore, there is no excuse for not saving that kid. What's the use of chasing the vulture away? It would come back, right?
    On hindsight we can all say, "Kelvin Carter ought to... He shld... Why dun he...."

    But ever thought that aid workers and press workers working in Africa are subjected to certain red-tape and procedures that would mean that if u're a press worker, 'do ur job only and don't get in the way of others' or even subjected to certain health & medical procedures that would even forbid people not officially working as aid workers to touch even the sick/starving people there?

    Den again, we are not in his shoes and we do not have the honour of working as an aid worker/press photographer there so we may not know very well the exact rules and constraints bounding the volunteers there.

    Its always easy to stand on the side of pure black or pure white when one's not actually involved in things. But when one is thrown in the situation proper, one would reconsider pulling off a GTO-like stunt.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Why ask such questions?

    Quote Originally Posted by sprintist View Post
    Was wondering after seeing the photos and brought back the article i read about.

    the thread is posted here http://clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=310724

    If it were you, on in the shoes of kevin carter, what would u have done without hesitation, to snap or to save him?

    Is the responsiblity of portraying news greater or is another fragile life another burden you have to handle? What would you do?

  15. #15

    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    whatever you do, you make a choice
    live with your choice

    simpler than it really is, i suppose

    there is always that conundrum when you are a photojournalist, i suppose
    whether you put down the camera, and try to help the people,
    or do your job, document them so that the world can know

    sounds very dramatic huh

    is this not worse

    "moment of death" robert capa

  16. #16

    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Quote Originally Posted by night86mare View Post
    whatever you do, you make a choice
    live with your choice

    simpler than it really is, i suppose

    there is always that conundrum when you are a photojournalist, i suppose
    whether you put down the camera, and try to help the people,
    or do your job, document them so that the world can know

    sounds very dramatic huh

    is this not worse

    "moment of death" robert capa
    yes that is worse because it's been alleged convincely that this was a staged photograph
    *wags finger*

  17. #17

    Default Re: Drawing the line between life and photography

    Quote Originally Posted by mattlock View Post
    yes that is worse because it's been alleged convincely that this was a staged photograph
    *wags finger*
    really

    the last amateur photography magazine i read claimed that it was proven to be not staged
    hee hee
    hard to tell
    must read up more, robert capa eh

    aha

    link
    Last edited by night86mare; 16th September 2007 at 06:44 PM.

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