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Thread: Differences in Hoya filter labels

  1. #1
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    Default Differences in Hoya filter labels

    Hi all,

    I'm quite puzzled over the variety of HMC variants available.

    What does the (0) or (N) after the lens coating mean?
    e.g. HMC(N) vs. HMC(0), UV-Guard(0), Super HMC(0) etc?

    Have tried a web trawl & a visit to Hoya site but not much conclusive info.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    I only know that UV-Guard is the cheapest type which is single-coated, then HMC is the multi-coated one which is slightly more expensive and Super-HMC is the most expensive one thats also multi-coated. (N) stands for neutral, (O) I don't know and I also don't know the difference between (N) and (O). UV-Guard gave some flaring with some of my lenses so I stuck with HMC. Super-HMC is too ex.
    5D MII w/16-35L,Sigma 28-70&Nikkors(35f2,85f1.4,105f2.5,180f2.8ED)

  3. #3

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    0 means no colour cast, IIRC.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    they alos have the "Pro 1 D"

  5. #5

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    many diff filters, the glass substrates made from different countries.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    UV (0) means uv zero.. usually a UV filter with a slight slight pinkish hue

    (N) is neutral if i'm not wrong, will not affect color of picture/white balance.

    i use mostly super hmcs on my lenses, as they are quite well priced compared to other higher end brands, almost invisible as you look through them
    chezburgr i can haz?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    btw UV guard i.e. UV(0) is the lowest end of hoya filters, it flares, and has very little coating, most prob only one side

    HMC = hoya multi coat
    suuper hmc = super hoya multi coat..

    http://www.hoyafilter.com/products/hoya/coatings.html
    chezburgr i can haz?

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    UV(o) is optical glass, UV(n) is normal glass.

    Hoya previously made all filters UV(o) but due to cost cutting measure, they introduced the usage of normal glass compared to optical glass.

    to put everything into short talk, most amateur/intermediate grade Hoya UV filters are made of normal glass. eg. UV, HMC UV.
    for professional grade filters, it is made of optical glass. eg. S-HMC UV(o), Pro-1 S-HMV UV(o).

  9. #9

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    Quote Originally Posted by cphile View Post
    Hi all,

    I'm quite puzzled over the variety of HMC variants available.

    What does the (0) or (N) after the lens coating mean?
    e.g. HMC(N) vs. HMC(0), UV-Guard(0), Super HMC(0) etc?

    Have tried a web trawl & a visit to Hoya site but not much conclusive info.
    I've only seen UV(0). Never seen (N) or (0) after HMC.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    I never managed to fully understand this whole filter thing. I am currently using the HMC but just happen to be surfing their site, they have, of course the UV series, then I saw the Neutral series filter which to me seems to be just for lens protection. Then they also have the Pro1D Protector series and also the Pro1D UV...If most of us are getting filters just for protection purpose, shouldn't we just get the 'Protector' or 'Neutral' instead of UV guard? Considering that the earlier 2 doesn't affect any colour balance (or does the UV really affect?)

    Now, I'm confused just reading my post....
    Last edited by rendition; 2nd March 2008 at 09:24 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    If in doubt.... just use the aged-old method - buy the MOST expensive one
    Who Dares Wins!

  12. #12

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    Quote Originally Posted by drewdam View Post
    they alos have the "Pro 1 D"
    just bought the cpl for S$60+ in hk. is it considered expensive for 62mm?no experience on filter buying

  13. #13

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    S$60 is a good buy for cpl as average it cost anything from $95 and abv for a reputable brand here.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    Quote Originally Posted by skywalker28 View Post
    If in doubt.... just use the aged-old method - buy the MOST expensive one
    that could merely mean getting chopped...

  15. #15

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    Quote Originally Posted by Rendy View Post
    I never managed to fully understand this whole filter thing. I am currently using the HMC but just happen to be surfing their site, they have, of course the UV series, then I saw the Neutral series filter which to me seems to be just for lens protection. Then they also have the Pro1D Protector series and also the Pro1D UV...If most of us are getting filters just for protection purpose, shouldn't we just get the 'Protector' or 'Neutral' instead of UV guard? Considering that the earlier 2 doesn't affect any colour balance (or does the UV really affect?)

    Now, I'm confused just reading my post....
    If you're shooting film, you should get the UV. But for digital, no need for UV cut anymore, so it's cheaper to get a Neutral or Protector.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    Ahh...OK, cool, thanks, just saw a site saying that too. What really perplexed me was...considering that many claimed the redundancy of using UV filter on DSLR, why on earth does Hoya have a UV protector for the Pro1 D series which is designed for digital cameras.

    Anyways, for now, I shall settle for protector filters.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    Quote Originally Posted by Rendy View Post
    Ahh...OK, cool, thanks, just saw a site saying that too. What really perplexed me was...considering that many claimed the redundancy of using UV filter on DSLR, why on earth does Hoya have a UV protector for the Pro1 D series which is designed for digital cameras.
    For the same reason why you see magnetic bracelets or "molecularly modified water" advertised: Because enough people will happily part their money to make it profitable.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    Quote Originally Posted by Rendy View Post
    Ahh...OK, cool, thanks, just saw a site saying that too. What really perplexed me was...considering that many claimed the redundancy of using UV filter on DSLR, why on earth does Hoya have a UV protector for the Pro1 D series which is designed for digital cameras.

    Anyways, for now, I shall settle for protector filters.
    Some people do use the same piece of lens for digital as well as for film. It would be a hassle to change to a UV filter only when you want to shoot film. Might as well just get a UV because you can use it for both digital and film. Many of my DX lenses just use a protector like NC or Pro1D protector but the other full frame lenses are all L1Bc (Skylight) or L37c (UV).
    Last edited by lsisaxon; 4th March 2008 at 11:13 AM.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    Hi, i'm planning on getting the Hoya Pro filters for my lenses also.. from what i heard UV could damage your DSLR camera sensor? Is this true? How come Digital Camera no longer need to use UV coating filters? any insight will be greatly appreciated.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Differences in Hoya filter labels

    Quote Originally Posted by pictograph View Post
    Hi, i'm planning on getting the Hoya Pro filters for my lenses also.. from what i heard UV could damage your DSLR camera sensor? Is this true? How come Digital Camera no longer need to use UV coating filters? any insight will be greatly appreciated.
    UV will cause a haze effect (lowering of contrast) in certain film types. DSLR doesn't suffer from this problem. Don't see how UV can damage the sensor, it can almost certainly give you skin cancer and cataract if you get exposed long enough though..

    http://www.nikonians.org/html/resour..._filters1.html
    Last edited by lsisaxon; 9th April 2008 at 12:58 PM.

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