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Thread: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

  1. #1

    Default how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    i finally got a clear shot at the moon last night. took me quite a while to get it in sharp focus(to the best of my eyes' abilities) but i had to use ISO800 to get a fast shutter.
    but even then, the i can see the vibrations when i use the timer to trigger the shutter.

    is changing a tripod going to make a difference?
    [QUOTE=dan_1337;2947523]if it was painted white, it would cost twice as much as Sigma =P[QUOTE]

  2. #2
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    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Now... Are you using a DSLR? If you are, you should have used a remote trigger, and used mirror lock to prevent vibrations when you take astrophotos. Else use a self timer.

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    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Quote Originally Posted by Murcielago View Post
    i finally got a clear shot at the moon last night. took me quite a while to get it in sharp focus(to the best of my eyes' abilities) but i had to use ISO800 to get a fast shutter.
    but even then, the i can see the vibrations when i use the timer to trigger the shutter.

    is changing a tripod going to make a difference?
    Go to www.singastro.org, Singapore own astro website. Those guys there will be able to help you. There are many moon, planets and deep sky photos there.

  4. #4

    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    need to provide more details

    yeap. using a D70s. it doesnt have MLU which pisses me off.
    [QUOTE=dan_1337;2947523]if it was painted white, it would cost twice as much as Sigma =P[QUOTE]

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    Senior Member dominator's Avatar
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    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Mlu is very important.

    Else take in bulb mode, use black card confirm work.
    Cleanse your thoughts, not by the foods you eat.

  6. #6
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Quote Originally Posted by Murcielago View Post
    i finally got a clear shot at the moon last night. took me quite a while to get it in sharp focus(to the best of my eyes' abilities) but i had to use ISO800 to get a fast shutter.
    but even then, the i can see the vibrations when i use the timer to trigger the shutter.

    is changing a tripod going to make a difference?

    A sturdy tripod like a Manfrotto 190 for example would help alot. Making sure that all three legs are anchor nicely to the ground. Take note that the ground you place your tripod on is not experincing vibration. For example, a bridge with cars going over it, vibration from thos cars will vibrate the bridge structure and thus transmit that up your tripod to your camera.
    I think soil ground is good, I would use my spike tip end to dig into the ground for added grip.

    I sometime drape my haversack on the legs portion just under the camera to add weight and add to keeping it's stablility. If your tripod is smaller then the one I mentioned and the legs are too light and thin, try to not fully extending the legs. Extend the top stages of the 2 or 3 portion legs since they are thicken at the up then the bottom final length piece which are skinny and thin. This helps with the stability issue.

    Someone here suggested a remote control to trigger your camera, that is a good idea. Pressing the shutter button with your finger can also contribute to some vibration so the remote helps eliminate that. In normal day time shooting, you will be surpirse to know alot of people still have not master the fine art of pressing the shutter button the right way to cut down vibration and shaking the camera. ( I tend to roll my index finger over the button in a rocking motion instead of pressing down on the button from the top down)

    If your camera does have the shutter lock feature, you should enable that too to further reduce vibration. If you did not know, the slapping actiojn of the mirror inside your camera can be stong enough to shake your camera just enough to register on your image.

    Another thing you can try would require you to make some special gear if you are really into shooting night scene like city scape or the moon...etc. Take a cardboard about 16cm x16cm..purchase a dark (short crop velvet if possible) pitch black cloth and cover the entire cardboard including the sides. That means folding the excess cloth sides over and behind the cardboard. Velvet is good as it catches stray light better.

    No mirror lock? No problem..you can try this. The idea is to use this balck cloth board to block light by placing it infront of the lens. We are talking about a few cm away from the front of the lens. (Enough to cover the entire focal length of the lens) Now this is how you shoot. This works well if you are shooting aren need something like 10 to 15second long exposures. Well it can be shorter or longer duration lah but you get the point. ( Now this can only be done in a field and in relative darkness) Set your camera to BULB. You will be controling the long exposure manual by the way.

    Set up your shot. So time to shoot. What you do first is you have the black board covering the lens front with the black clothing facing your lens of course. Then you use your remote control or cable trigger to trigger your shutter open. Once you open your shutter up to capture the scene. Then you remove the black cardboard and let the light from your scene register inside your camera CCD as per normal. Just as you get to the last moment of your pre-determine exposure time, you block the front of your lens again with the black cardboard and then you trigger the remote to shut the shutter down or in the case of your finger

    The black cloth cardboard was use to eliminate any vibration when the shutter open to effect your shot as you have a black cloth in front so no light will hit the CCD till you remove the cardboard. And just as you are about come to the end of your present shutter duration, you put the cloth back there to prevent any vibration from the shutter closing. Simple? hehhe.. This way has been use by me and alot of other who take night pictures for years.

    hope this helps

  7. #7

    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Quote Originally Posted by sammy888 View Post
    A sturdy tripod like a Manfrotto 190 for example would help alot. Making sure that all three legs are anchor nicely to the ground. Take note that the ground you place your tripod on is not experincing vibration. For example, a bridge with cars going over it, vibration from thos cars will vibrate the bridge structure and thus transmit that up your tripod to your camera.
    I think soil ground is good, I would use my spike tip end to dig into the ground for added grip.

    I sometime drape my haversack on the legs portion just under the camera to add weight and add to keeping it's stablility. If your tripod is smaller then the one I mentioned and the legs are too light and thin, try to not fully extending the legs. Extend the top stages of the 2 or 3 portion legs since they are thicken at the up then the bottom final length piece which are skinny and thin. This helps with the stability issue.

    Someone here suggested a remote control to trigger your camera, that is a good idea. Pressing the shutter button with your finger can also contribute to some vibration so the remote helps eliminate that. In normal day time shooting, you will be surpirse to know alot of people still have not master the fine art of pressing the shutter button the right way to cut down vibration and shaking the camera. ( I tend to roll my index finger over the button in a rocking motion instead of pressing down on the button from the top down)

    If your camera does have the shutter lock feature, you should enable that too to further reduce vibration. If you did not know, the slapping actiojn of the mirror inside your camera can be stong enough to shake your camera just enough to register on your image.

    Another thing you can try would require you to make some special gear if you are really into shooting night scene like city scape or the moon...etc. Take a cardboard about 16cm x16cm..purchase a dark (short crop velvet if possible) pitch black cloth and cover the entire cardboard including the sides. That means folding the excess cloth sides over and behind the cardboard. Velvet is good as it catches stray light better.

    No mirror lock? No problem..you can try this. The idea is to use this balck cloth board to block light by placing it infront of the lens. We are talking about a few cm away from the front of the lens. (Enough to cover the entire focal length of the lens) Now this is how you shoot. This works well if you are shooting aren need something like 10 to 15second long exposures. Well it can be shorter or longer duration lah but you get the point. ( Now this can only be done in a field and in relative darkness) Set your camera to BULB. You will be controling the long exposure manual by the way.

    Set up your shot. So time to shoot. What you do first is you have the black board covering the lens front with the black clothing facing your lens of course. Then you use your remote control or cable trigger to trigger your shutter open. Once you open your shutter up to capture the scene. Then you remove the black cardboard and let the light from your scene register inside your camera CCD as per normal. Just as you get to the last moment of your pre-determine exposure time, you block the front of your lens again with the black cardboard and then you trigger the remote to shut the shutter down or in the case of your finger

    The black cloth cardboard was use to eliminate any vibration when the shutter open to effect your shot as you have a black cloth in front so no light will hit the CCD till you remove the cardboard. And just as you are about come to the end of your present shutter duration, you put the cloth back there to prevent any vibration from the shutter closing. Simple? hehhe.. This way has been use by me and alot of other who take night pictures for years.

    hope this helps
    thanks for the great write up.

    probably get my tripod soon.

    but for fast speeds like 1/400 etc ?
    [QUOTE=dan_1337;2947523]if it was painted white, it would cost twice as much as Sigma =P[QUOTE]

  8. #8

    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    what are the settings when you took your moon? Don't forget Earth rotates (Moon moves).

  9. #9

    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    One method I used to dampen the vibration is to drape my (folded) jeans on top of the extended lens. Felt more stable that way.

  10. #10

    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Quote Originally Posted by mrngbss View Post
    what are the settings when you took your moon? Don't forget Earth rotates (Moon moves).
    used a nikon 500mm f8 mirror with a teleplus 1.4x. so f11 ?
    shutter speed 1/400 or 1/500(1/500s gets sharper images.)
    iso 800
    [QUOTE=dan_1337;2947523]if it was painted white, it would cost twice as much as Sigma =P[QUOTE]

  11. #11
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Quote Originally Posted by Murcielago View Post
    used a nikon 500mm f8 mirror with a teleplus 1.4x. so f11 ?
    shutter speed 1/400 or 1/500(1/500s gets sharper images.)
    iso 800
    500mm+ 1.4X !!..That would be quite the super challenge. As the focal length gets longer, even minute movement or light tapping or knocking would exagerate the vibration at the lens end. What ah.zeep suggested would also be good. Draping the jeans over the lens will dampen some of the shake away. But then again I am thinking..if you firing off at 1/400 or 1/500 that is a pretty shot period and would further prevent slow movement from being registered unlike say very fast vibration or using a shutter speed of say 1 second. I think if you have a more sturdy tripod that would help since you mentioned you are going to get a new tripod...that would mean you are now not using one or using one that is too skinny and light to help you steady the camera body/lens combo. Keep us updated! hehe..
    Last edited by sammy888; 25th August 2007 at 04:41 PM.

  12. #12

    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    my tripod is the PPCP one..
    [QUOTE=dan_1337;2947523]if it was painted white, it would cost twice as much as Sigma =P[QUOTE]

  13. #13
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Quote Originally Posted by Murcielago View Post
    my tripod is the PPCP one..
    They do make pretty good tripod for both the budget and the pro I understand?

  14. #14

    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Quote Originally Posted by sammy888 View Post
    They do make pretty good tripod for both the budget and the pro I understand?
    yes but it cant handle my 500mm setup. mine was the budget i think.
    [QUOTE=dan_1337;2947523]if it was painted white, it would cost twice as much as Sigma =P[QUOTE]

  15. #15
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    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Quote Originally Posted by Murcielago View Post
    i finally got a clear shot at the moon last night. took me quite a while to get it in sharp focus(to the best of my eyes' abilities) but i had to use ISO800 to get a fast shutter.
    but even then, the i can see the vibrations when i use the timer to trigger the shutter.
    How long is your exposure time? Are you sure the moon appears blurred due to vibrations? If your telescope isn't tracking properly, it could be just motion blur of the moon (or rather revolving earth) itself ...

    For "real" astrophotography where exposure times go into minutes or hours, a split second of vibration doesn't matter at all. The main problem (in Singapore at least) will likely be the light pollution.

  16. #16
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf View Post
    How long is your exposure time? Are you sure the moon appears blurred due to vibrations? If your telescope isn't tracking properly, it could be just motion blur of the moon (or rather revolving earth) itself ...

    For "real" astrophotography where exposure times go into minutes or hours, a split second of vibration doesn't matter at all. The main problem (in Singapore at least) will likely be the light pollution.
    He mentioned shutter speed 1/400 or 1/500 at iso 800. At that kind of speed, star or moon movement does not even need to be factored in.

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    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    Quote Originally Posted by sammy888 View Post
    He mentioned shutter speed 1/400 or 1/500 at iso 800. At that kind of speed, star or moon movement does not even need to be factored in.
    My bad. I overlooked the numbers.

  18. #18

    Default Re: how to dampen the vibrations when doing astrophotography?

    maybe the shake come from the shutter? the shutter shake your camera a bit when it flips?

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