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Thread: How does metering work?

  1. #1

    Default How does metering work?

    How does the 3 different metering functions work on a canon 400D? whats the difference between each one of them? evaluative,partial and center weighted. Thanks guyss

  2. #2
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    Smile Re: How does metering work?

    Quote Originally Posted by yamadoo View Post
    How does the 3 different metering functions work on a canon 400D? whats the difference between each one of them? evaluative,partial and center weighted. Thanks guyss
    The instruction manual has some simple explanations perhaps u need to read it.
    Canon EOS 20D|EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS|EF 17-40mm f/4L|EF 85mmII f1.2L|EF 50mm f/1.8 II|580EX

  3. #3

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    Refer to this thread for example

    http://web.canon.jp/imaging/enjoydslr/p_3_012.html

  4. #4

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    Quote Originally Posted by Squid View Post

    thanks!!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: How does metering work?

    In very basic terms:
    Metering means to ensure that u properly expose ur scene. There are 3 kinds of mode (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
    (a) matrix metering - normally used in landscape photography to properly expose the whole scene, the camera will determine the light across the whole picture and try to find the best setting to properly expose everything.

    (b) centre weighted - normally used in portrait setting or other scenes where there is a main object that occupies abt 70% of the picture center. The camera will try to properly expose the 70% of that picture and "ignore" the background. So for example, if ur object is black and ur background is white, the camera will meter the black object, and will try to adjust itself to bring out the black object's details. In order to do so, it got to expose more. So wat u get is a properly exposed black object against a over exposed background. Remember the background is already white, and because of the need to expose more to bring out the black details, the white background will be overexposed.
    So i think u get wat i mean, the camera will only care abt the center 70%.

    (c) spot metering - similar to the centre weighted metering, but just that in spot metering, we meter only a small spot eg. a 6mm diameter circle in the picture. This is used for example, when there is a small frog in a bright picture. if u use matrix metering, the camera will evaluate the whole scene and think that the whole picture is too bright, and hence under expose the picture to generate a proper exposure for the whole scene. But in doing so, the small frog may be further underexposed and become dark frog.
    in addition, if u use centre weighted metering, remember it assigns abt 70% to the center of the picture, but the frog is only very very small in the picture! hence the end result will also be the camera feels that the scene is too bright and underexpose.
    Thus in spot metering, u aim the center crosshair on the frog to meter the frog. This will ensure that the frog is properly exposed and be seen! but of course the background may not be properly exposed.

    In apeture priority, shutter priority and program mode, u need to select ur desired metering style: (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering and then the camera will take care of the metering, thus u just concentrate on selecting the correct apeture, shutter speed or iso value/white balance to shoot ur photo.

    But for manual mode:
    1) Switch ur camera to manual mode
    2) Select ur desired metering style: (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
    3) if using spot metering or centre weighted metering, remember to point ur centre crosshair onto ur desired object.
    4) look into ur viewfinder and u will see a horizontal bar something like this + lllllll|llllll -
    5) what u got to do now, is to turn ur apeture dial or ur shutter dial to make sure that the horizontal bar is centered
    6) half press ur shutter release so that the exposure is locked i.e. even if u point at other places in ur scene, the metering wont change due to metering other objects.
    7) frame ur photo nicely and shoot.

    Hope u understand all that i just typed..have fun
    09 Oct 09 officially marks the date I become a canon convert.

  6. #6

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    Quote Originally Posted by Squid View Post
    Great help! thanks

  7. #7

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    Quote Originally Posted by kcuf2 View Post
    In very basic terms:
    Metering means to ensure that u properly expose ur scene. There are 3 kinds of mode (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
    (a) matrix metering - normally used in landscape photography to properly expose the whole scene, the camera will determine the light across the whole picture and try to find the best setting to properly expose everything.

    (b) centre weighted - normally used in portrait setting or other scenes where there is a main object that occupies abt 70% of the picture center. The camera will try to properly expose the 70% of that picture and "ignore" the background. So for example, if ur object is black and ur background is white, the camera will meter the black object, and will try to adjust itself to bring out the black object's details. In order to do so, it got to expose more. So wat u get is a properly exposed black object against a over exposed background. Remember the background is already white, and because of the need to expose more to bring out the black details, the white background will be overexposed.
    So i think u get wat i mean, the camera will only care abt the center 70%.

    (c) spot metering - similar to the centre weighted metering, but just that in spot metering, we meter only a small spot eg. a 6mm diameter circle in the picture. This is used for example, when there is a small frog in a bright picture. if u use matrix metering, the camera will evaluate the whole scene and think that the whole picture is too bright, and hence under expose the picture to generate a proper exposure for the whole scene. But in doing so, the small frog may be further underexposed and become dark frog.
    in addition, if u use centre weighted metering, remember it assigns abt 70% to the center of the picture, but the frog is only very very small in the picture! hence the end result will also be the camera feels that the scene is too bright and underexpose.
    Thus in spot metering, u aim the center crosshair on the frog to meter the frog. This will ensure that the frog is properly exposed and be seen! but of course the background may not be properly exposed.

    In apeture priority, shutter priority and program mode, u need to select ur desired metering style: (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering and then the camera will take care of the metering, thus u just concentrate on selecting the correct apeture, shutter speed or iso value/white balance to shoot ur photo.

    But for manual mode:
    1) Switch ur camera to manual mode
    2) Select ur desired metering style: (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
    3) if using spot metering or centre weighted metering, remember to point ur centre crosshair onto ur desired object.
    4) look into ur viewfinder and u will see a horizontal bar something like this + lllllll|llllll -
    5) what u got to do now, is to turn ur apeture dial or ur shutter dial to make sure that the horizontal bar is centered
    6) half press ur shutter release so that the exposure is locked i.e. even if u point at other places in ur scene, the metering wont change due to metering other objects.
    7) frame ur photo nicely and shoot.

    Hope u understand all that i just typed..have fun
    thanks man! much clearer now!

  8. #8

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    Quote Originally Posted by kcuf2 View Post
    In very basic terms:
    Metering means to ensure that u properly expose ur scene. There are 3 kinds of mode (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
    (a) matrix metering - normally used in landscape photography to properly expose the whole scene, the camera will determine the light across the whole picture and try to find the best setting to properly expose everything.

    (b) centre weighted - normally used in portrait setting or other scenes where there is a main object that occupies abt 70% of the picture center. The camera will try to properly expose the 70% of that picture and "ignore" the background. So for example, if ur object is black and ur background is white, the camera will meter the black object, and will try to adjust itself to bring out the black object's details. In order to do so, it got to expose more. So wat u get is a properly exposed black object against a over exposed background. Remember the background is already white, and because of the need to expose more to bring out the black details, the white background will be overexposed.
    So i think u get wat i mean, the camera will only care abt the center 70%.

    (c) spot metering - similar to the centre weighted metering, but just that in spot metering, we meter only a small spot eg. a 6mm diameter circle in the picture. This is used for example, when there is a small frog in a bright picture. if u use matrix metering, the camera will evaluate the whole scene and think that the whole picture is too bright, and hence under expose the picture to generate a proper exposure for the whole scene. But in doing so, the small frog may be further underexposed and become dark frog.
    in addition, if u use centre weighted metering, remember it assigns abt 70% to the center of the picture, but the frog is only very very small in the picture! hence the end result will also be the camera feels that the scene is too bright and underexpose.
    Thus in spot metering, u aim the center crosshair on the frog to meter the frog. This will ensure that the frog is properly exposed and be seen! but of course the background may not be properly exposed.

    In apeture priority, shutter priority and program mode, u need to select ur desired metering style: (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering and then the camera will take care of the metering, thus u just concentrate on selecting the correct apeture, shutter speed or iso value/white balance to shoot ur photo.

    But for manual mode:
    1) Switch ur camera to manual mode
    2) Select ur desired metering style: (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
    3) if using spot metering or centre weighted metering, remember to point ur centre crosshair onto ur desired object.
    4) look into ur viewfinder and u will see a horizontal bar something like this + lllllll|llllll -
    5) what u got to do now, is to turn ur apeture dial or ur shutter dial to make sure that the horizontal bar is centered
    6) half press ur shutter release so that the exposure is locked i.e. even if u point at other places in ur scene, the metering wont change due to metering other objects.
    7) frame ur photo nicely and shoot.

    Hope u understand all that i just typed..have fun
    Awesome, definitely alot easier to understand Thanks!

  9. #9

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    may i ask a question: how to metering by a camera ? Is it automatically when focus on the subject then shoot ? I mean, as example: When i wanna shoot a pic with a box is the object, i focus on the box and release the shutter speed. So is it automatically metering ? Or i can metering in different way ? thanks

  10. #10
    Senior Member blueskye168's Avatar
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    Default Re: How does metering work?

    Well, thru my experiences & encounters, choosing the "correct" Metering is as Important to the extend that would otherwise &/or certain situation causes things like "underexposure" & "backlighting" problems just to name some of them.

    Also, determine your subject/ &/or areas that you want it to be correctly exposed is as important.
    Last edited by blueskye168; 17th August 2007 at 08:48 AM.
    Anything that can take pictures...happy already lor...(..but...Hasselblad_H5D-50 as my Workhorse)

  11. #11

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    Quote Originally Posted by kcuf2 View Post
    In very basic terms:
    Metering means to ensure that u properly expose ur scene. There are 3 kinds of mode (a) matrix metering (b) centre weighted (c) spot metering
    I think the TS asked about 400D - it doesn't have "spot metering" as the usual word go i think. Only

    - Evaluative 35-zone
    - Partial 9% at center
    - Center-weighted average

    May be partial center was what you meant, and it looks like Canon wants to distinguish between "spot metering" and "partial metering".
    Last edited by estel; 17th August 2007 at 10:30 AM.

  12. #12

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    thanks bro for the information..good stuff..=)

  13. #13

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    sorry to dig out the old thread

    want to ask, how to i meter? just aim the object with the crosshair and snap?

  14. #14

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    Hi,
    Quote Originally Posted by gaoxing840 View Post
    sorry to dig out the old thread

    want to ask, how to i meter? just aim the object with the crosshair and snap?
    Half-press the shoot button will focus and meter at the same time.

    Have a nice day.

  15. #15

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    Quote Originally Posted by gaoxing840 View Post
    ...., how to i meter? just aim the object with the crosshair and snap?
    Essentially yes. Intention is to have the subject (presumably a person) to be properly exposed. Choice of metering for Canon camera to achieve the intention is given at this webpage

  16. #16

    Default Re: How does metering work?

    oh man. that's what i need man! thanks!

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