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Thread: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

  1. #1

    Default How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    What is a balanced photo? I hope a pro can explain to me and show me some examples? Kamsahapnida!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    not a pro, but here's what i think. a balanced photograph is one where the objects/elements in the frame are placed/set such that their relationships in the frame can be read without excessive effort.

  3. #3

    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    With respect to what? Your question is too general.
    e.g. Lighting (Exposure) or Foreground to background interest (Composition).

  4. #4

    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    I feel that balancing of a photo means using the various elements in a picture to support each other. It should be in terms of composition? no? Say you visualize a picture with a subject placed at 1/3 position. Just a small one. The rest of the area is empty. Doesnt it feel wierd? However, if you have a little something on the other side, even if its an oof of the same thing or animal. It sort of fills up the space and give more ommph to the picture. am not an expert but just giving 2cts. =) Balancing can be done with the same element or different element i guess. Like human, with a building etc?

    Regards,
    tltan

  5. #5

    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    Quote Originally Posted by ipin View Post
    With respect to what? Your question is too general.
    e.g. Lighting (Exposure) or Foreground to background interest (Composition).
    So your definition of BP is exposure and composition balanced?

  6. #6

    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    Quote Originally Posted by tltan View Post
    I feel that balancing of a photo means using the various elements in a picture to support each other. It should be in terms of composition? no? Say you visualize a picture with a subject placed at 1/3 position. Just a small one. The rest of the area is empty. Doesnt it feel wierd? However, if you have a little something on the other side, even if its an oof of the same thing or animal. It sort of fills up the space and give more ommph to the picture. am not an expert but just giving 2cts. =) Balancing can be done with the same element or different element i guess. Like human, with a building etc?

    Regards,
    tltan
    hokays thanks your view is almost similar to mine. But I think BP is subjective. I showed some photos to some people and got various feedback about what is a BP (balanced photo). The feedback varied to the point of contradicting one another. I guess this kind of thing is to each his own kind. However, why is it that some pro photos can receive from everybody? Something must be lacking in my photo skill, and this is the part the I would want to work on.

  7. #7

    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    Quote Originally Posted by noobie View Post
    So your definition of BP is exposure and composition balanced?
    those are just some examples.

  8. #8

    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    Quote Originally Posted by noobie View Post
    hokays thanks your view is almost similar to mine. But I think BP is subjective. I showed some photos to some people and got various feedback about what is a BP (balanced photo). The feedback varied to the point of contradicting one another. I guess this kind of thing is to each his own kind. However, why is it that some pro photos can receive from everybody? Something must be lacking in my photo skill, and this is the part the I would want to work on.
    so, does this mean that if you are a pro, ur photos look balanced no matter how unbalanced it is? =p

    just joking. its a friday!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    Its ok if your photos are "unbalanced" if that's your intention. You only have yourself to convince if its good.

  10. #10

    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    In terms of light, I think generally a balanced image would have the peak of the histogram at the centre and the histogram should spread out throughout the entire graph.

    In terms of composition, especially in landscape photography, you must have all the 3 elements in an image to be balanced - foreground, mid-ground and background elements.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    This is a question that I had wanted to ask too. In many books that I read so far, they always mention about a picture being balance, but does not really explain why so.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: How do you define a "Balanced Photograph"?

    A picture's worth a thousand words. For me, this picture below demonstrates the concept of balance, where every key element in the photo has an equal weight. Hope you don't mind Khairi

    http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthrea...light=balanced

    Most times, a good photo requires a subject that centres (or focuses) the interest. This photo may initially look cluttered and not have a concrete centre of interest which tends to evoke a feeling of confusion. But it is precisely how, despite the clutter, all the elements come together in the photo, creating an unlikely sense of calm that, for me, best describes balance. In this case it is the balance of all the subjects in the photo, a symmetry that is not immediately obvious, that is the subject.

    Disclaimer : Please ignore if you think I'm babbling.

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