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Thread: Anyone uses FL-D or FL-W filter?

  1. #1
    Kiwi
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    Default Anyone uses FL-D or FL-W filter?

    This is not a much talked about filter. Does any of you use or own it? I find when I need it, I really need it but on very rare occasions. Sometimes, I find the green color cast does add an interest to the picture...

  2. #2

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    I have a FL-D, which I got after my photos turned out greenish.

    Unfortunately even when using the FL-D the results turned out the same. Probably because the exposure was too long? It can't be the wrong filter because I checked the flourescent tubes before puchasing the filter.

  3. #3
    Kiwi
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    Hi Munfai,

    Thanks for sharing. Have you tried a shorter exposure and see if the filter does improve the situation?

    I've always thot of getting this filter but I'm trying to minimize the number of filters I carry, especially when I travel. But when I need it, I really need it! the green can be really overwhelming at times... makes the whole picture look "sick". But sometimes, if the effect is mild, I find it does add a certain atmosphere to the scene...

  4. #4

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    no, unfortunately have not had the time to try again. I'll try again one of these days and let you know the result.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2002
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    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
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    6,405

    Default

    Flourescent lighting can be tricky to shoot. With so many types (normal, cool, warm, etc) or even mixed, things start to get complicated. This makes filtering difficult as well.

    Another thing, according to Thom Hogan in his Guide to the D100 eBook, shoot below 1/100, in multiples of 1/100 (e.g. 1/25, 1/50, etc) to avoid unpredictable colour casts.

    That said, I still find it hard to shoot properly under flourescent lighting.

    Regards
    CK

  6. #6

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    Originally posted by ckiang
    Another thing, according to Thom Hogan in his Guide to the D100 eBook, shoot below 1/100, in multiples of 1/100 (e.g. 1/25, 1/50, etc) to avoid unpredictable colour casts.
    Interesting. Did the author explain why we should do that?

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2002
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    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
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    Default

    Originally posted by munfai
    Interesting. Did the author explain why we should do that?
    Something cheem. Something to do with the exciting intervals of the phosphors in the flourescent tube. USA do it 60 cycles per second, UK/SG 50 cycles. Catch it at the wrong point of the cycle, you get colour casts from the phosphors...

    Regards
    CK

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