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Thread: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

  1. #21

    Default Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by Melee View Post
    Regarding recharging of silica gel, the principle is to heat it sufficiently so that the adsorbed moisture is driven out. I recently did this with a full bottle of silica gel in a microwave oven. Humidity in my dry box was 70% at first. I put the silica gel into a microwave-safe container (can use one of those disposable plastic bowls that hawkers use to da bao soup, which are labelled on the base "FOR MICROWAVE REHEATING ONLY"). Microwaved at LOW setting for 15 minutes. Allowed the gel to cool then put back into dry box. Dry box now reading 20-30% humidity. =) And I threw away the plastic bowl after that.
    What I always do is to heat the gel beads at 'defrost' setting on the microwave.
    Once I left it on 'high' by accident once and some of the beads along with its ceramic (!) container shattered due to the high heat. Beads were everywhere in the microwave -what a mess! But at least they turned blue again...

  2. #22

    Default Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    The biggest disadvantage to using Silica Gel is that... DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.

    Dry cabs work through the setting that you have preset, and whenever the humidity goes over a preset level, the dehumidifier kicks in and remove that excess moisture and all is good.

    Silica Gels, however, just keep sucking moisture until it is "full". Did you know that rubber needs to maintain some form of moisture or else it would crack? Also, did you know your expensive lenses has grease in it? When moisture is taken away from it... oh boy...

    You might be fungus free, but a cracked rubber grip on your gear or dried up grease in your VR/IS/OIS lens will cost you much more to repair. Especially when you fry the focusing motor in your camera at the same time.

    This, of course, happens over a long period of time, unless you are crazy enough to pack half your plastic container with silica gel and put your camera equipment in there... then, well... congrats... time to send your camera in for servicing.

    Interesting tip :

    When I travel for shoots and ends up in a humid place and knowing that I will not get access to a dry cab for weeks, the thing I usually do is to buy tea leaves wrapped in paper and drop them into the camera bag. Not only it removes some moisture, it removes odours as well. It is not perfect, but it is tested to drop the humidity in your bag by 5-10%.

    Happy storing.

    A dry cab is the most sensible way of storing your DSLR system. Or any cameras.

  3. #23

    Smile Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by polantics View Post
    u may want to get a lock lock but i heard of an electronic moisture absorber- u can plug the thing into the power mains and it will dry the silica inside...its reusable, kinda of like one of the posts above me mentioned...but dunno where to get it though..


    Can get it at Home-fix at ard $20.
    Last edited by cashec; 10th July 2007 at 01:32 AM.

  4. #24

    Default Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by cjtune View Post
    You might want to check out the actual melting point temperature of Cobalt Chloride. No way a microwave can reach those temperatures (the microwave oven itself will start melting...).
    You'll feel more relieved.
    But it's quite capable of dissolving in water, isn't it?

  5. #25

    Default Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by microcosm View Post
    The biggest disadvantage to using Silica Gel is that... DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.

    Dry cabs work through the setting that you have preset, and whenever the humidity goes over a preset level, the dehumidifier kicks in and remove that excess moisture and all is good.

    Silica Gels, however, just keep sucking moisture until it is "full". Did you know that rubber needs to maintain some form of moisture or else it would crack? Also, did you know your expensive lenses has grease in it? When moisture is taken away from it... oh boy...

    You might be fungus free, but a cracked rubber grip on your gear or dried up grease in your VR/IS/OIS lens will cost you much more to repair. Especially when you fry the focusing motor in your camera at the same time.

    This, of course, happens over a long period of time, unless you are crazy enough to pack half your plastic container with silica gel and put your camera equipment in there... then, well... congrats... time to send your camera in for servicing.

    Interesting tip :

    When I travel for shoots and ends up in a humid place and knowing that I will not get access to a dry cab for weeks, the thing I usually do is to buy tea leaves wrapped in paper and drop them into the camera bag. Not only it removes some moisture, it removes odours as well. It is not perfect, but it is tested to drop the humidity in your bag by 5-10%.

    Happy storing.

    A dry cab is the most sensible way of storing your DSLR system. Or any cameras.

    Silica gels will suck moisture up to one point till they are at equilibrium with the moisture level in the container, and that equilibrium point is not when the gel is full. It's sort of a thermodynamics tug-of-war between the gel and dry air (drier air also has the propensity to want to take in moisture too). To determine what amount of silica gels to use to achieve that oft-recommended 40-60% RH, throw in a cheap hygrometer. Anywhere from S$10-20. You will need some trial and error to size in how much gels to use the first time.

    I keep my camera and lenses in a proper dry cabinet, and their bags in a bigger container with silica gel. For those who can't afford one... well I guess a container with silica is better than nothing...

    Dry air is a very minor factor in greases drying out. They much more prone to dry out due to heat, or be degraded by pollutants like ozone. I asked some old-fart grease expert on this when his gang was at my company try to peddle their stuff to us.

  6. #26

    Default Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by lsisaxon View Post
    But it's quite capable of dissolving in water, isn't it?
    But water vapor?
    (How do we traditionally obtain table salt?)

  7. #27

    Default Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by cjtune View Post
    But water vapor?
    (How do we traditionally obtain table salt?)
    You'll never know when the water vapour condenses back into the container and dissolves the cobalt chloride and somehow flows out of the container into somewhere in the microwave oven?

  8. #28

    Default Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by lsisaxon View Post
    You'll never know when the water vapour condenses back into the container and dissolves the cobalt chloride and somehow flows out of the container into somewhere in the microwave oven?
    Erm, use a better container? Try a ceramic bowl.

  9. #29

    Default Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    so best to get a dry cabinet??

  10. #30

    Default Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by kebeye View Post
    so best to get a dry cabinet??
    B I N G O !

  11. #31

    Default Re: Airtight Plastic vs Dry Cabinet

    ok will get one when i move the things in my room for some space to put 1 =)

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