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Thread: RE: Canon EOS Settings

  1. #1
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    Default RE: Canon EOS Settings

    Hi,

    I own a Canon EOS 50E and I face the following problems for indoor photography:

    When I set to Av (Apperture priority)and set f at about 4 to 5.6( or any other setting), the shutterspeed hovers around 0"7 to 1/2. This is a bit too slow, hence I switch on my flash. But the camera doesn't adjust the shutterspeed automatically and it still hovers around 0"7 to 1/2.

    Even when I set to Tv(shiutterspeed priority), the same problem occurs. When flash is switch on, max shutterspeed is 1/125, but the apperture rating keeps flashing, meaning min apperture is set but exposure is wrong.

    My friend's EOS 30 has the same problem, but he says he don't have such problems when using Nikon.

    It means that for Canon EOS cameras during indoor or night shooting, you gotta set to "M", "P", or all automatic modes. But even when you switch to "M", and switch on the flash and adjust everything manually, won't TTL not function and max flash output will be given???

    And even for "P" mode with flash on, shutterspeed and apperture cannot be adjusted. So it means that for indoor or night shooting, it is better to adjust to auto modes?

    Pls enlighten me.

  2. #2

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    I have asked that questions many many months before....For Av, your flash is for fill-in so your camera will shows that the shutter has to be slow. As for Tv, I find that even though my aperture blinks, shots still come out OK...

  3. #3
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    As what paladin explained, it is used as filled in flash in AV, anyway, maybe u wanna refer to this more detailed user manual by this site?

    http://eosdoc.com/manuals.asp?q=ElanII

    As quoted:

    Flash Exposure Modes
    In low light with the camera in P, Full Auto, and PIC modes the camera will usually select a wide aperture. Also the shutter speed will be held to no slower than 1/60 second, but as light levels increase the shutter speed will rise to be equal to the camera's highest sync speed (1/125 sec.). Also as light levels increase, to the point of over exposure by the brighter ambient light, the lens aperture will get increasingly smaller.

    With the camera in Av, Tv and M modes, the camera meter will insist on a full and proper ambient light exposure in addition to your flash exposure. It's the same thing as night flash mode in some other cameras. The background will be properly exposed by the ambient light exposure and the flash will insure that the subject in the foreground is properly exposed by the flash. However, if the light is dim, the shutter speed will get very slow, often too slow to hand hold the camera. If that happens you can simply turn the camera back to P mode which will raise the shutter to 1/60 second, but this will usually create dark, underexposed backgrounds. A slow shutter speed with the camera mounted on a tripod is often the best solution. Also, the Elan II/IIe has custom function # 9 to keep the shutter speed at 1/125 sec. in Av mode if you want that.

    I find that when using flash, setting the camera to manual mode is usually easier to keep everything in control. Since the flash exposure is being determined automatically anyway, having the camera on manual really doesn't slow much of anything down. Also, remember, that with flash the aperture effects both ambient lighting and flash lighting, but the shutter speed only effects ambient lighting. This is because the flash pulse is much faster than the shutter.




    Hope this helps..

  4. #4
    Senior Member wormz777's Avatar
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    Thanks cheechee. I am quite confused about this matter too

  5. #5

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    so i guess it is omething like auto slow sync? to allow the ambient light to properly expose the backgrd?

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    i notice that in my D60 too leh.. is there some way of solving it? tot i on flash the shutter speed should go up to 1/60? no?

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    if i am right, you can not change the apperture value for flash photography, because Aperture = Guide Number/Shooting Distance. therefore switching to AV mode will cause the camera switching to slow sync. but you can change shutter speed if flash supports high speed sync.

  8. #8

  9. #9

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    Originally posted by liuhao
    if i am right, you can not change the apperture value for flash photography, because Aperture = Guide Number/Shooting Distance. therefore switching to AV mode will cause the camera switching to slow sync. but you can change shutter speed if flash supports high speed sync.
    Er, very very misleading. You most definitely can change aperture for flash photography. The equation should be flash range = guide number / aperture fstop. So the larger the fstop you use, the lower the flash range and vice versa.

    Another mislead regarding high speed sync (or FP). High speed sync is relevant when your camera is limited by the flash sync speed of the shutter. E.g., if you desire to shoot at 1/250 but the flash sync speed is 1/200, you will be stuck at 1/200 unless you activate FP on your external flash, which will allow you to use shutter speed faster than 1/200.

    S40,

    In Av mode, a Canon camera flash system will be in fill flash mode. Meaning, the metering will take into account ONLY the ambient exposure, and will assume that the flash is a secondary light source. That's why your shutter speed doesn't change to a comfortable 1/60s, but remains at a good value for the correct ambient exposure. This implementation is not silly, it is actually very convenient for fill flash. It doesn't sound intuitive to a layman, but Canon cameras are designed for the more serious user anyway, so it assumes that if you know how to use Av mode, you should have some basic knowledge on flash photography.

    Which brings to the point that to use the flash as a primary light source with EOS cameras, go into M mode, and select any shutter speed and aperture combi you desire. As long as the flash range is not exceeded, the E-TTL flash will automatically fire at the correct power and exposure.

    If you are going to be a leisure shooter and are not interested in knowing how flash photography really works, then I'd suggest you stick to P mode or full auto mode (the green square) when you wish to do flash photography.
    Last edited by Tweek; 6th April 2003 at 10:29 PM.

  10. #10
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    oic. thank you very much for the explanation. long time i have this question but without an answer...


    Originally posted by Tweek
    Er, very very misleading. You most definitely can change aperture for flash photography. The equation should be flash range = guide number / aperture fstop. So the larger the fstop you use, the lower the flash range and vice versa.

    Another mislead regarding high speed sync (or FP). High speed sync is relevant when your camera is limited by the flash sync speed of the shutter. E.g., if you desire to shoot at 1/250 but the flash sync speed is 1/200, you will be stuck at 1/200 unless you activate FP on your external flash, which will allow you to use shutter speed faster than 1/200.

    S40,

    In Av mode, a Canon camera flash system will be in fill flash mode. Meaning, the metering will take into account ONLY the ambient exposure, and will assume that the flash is a secondary light source. That's why your shutter speed doesn't change to a comfortable 1/60s, but remains at a good value for the correct ambient exposure. This implementation is not silly, it is actually very convenient for fill flash. It doesn't sound intuitive to a layman, but Canon cameras are designed for the more serious user anyway, so it assumes that if you know how to use Av mode, you should have some basic knowledge on flash photography.

    Which brings to the point that to use the flash as a primary light source with EOS cameras, go into M mode, and select any shutter speed and aperture combi you desire. As long as the flash range is not exceeded, the E-TTL flash will automatically fire at the correct power and exposure.

    If you are going to be a leisure shooter and are not interested in knowing how flash photography really works, then I'd suggest you stick to P mode or full auto mode (the green square) when you wish to do flash photography.

  11. #11
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    Hi guys,

    thanks for all the detailed explanation.
    Now at least I know the charateristics of EOS cameras.

    It means that for flash photography, the best is to use a tripod for correct ambient lighting.

    But with shutterspeed at 1/2, will taking kids in action be blurred by their movement?

  12. #12

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    Originally posted by S40
    It means that for flash photography, the best is to use a tripod for correct ambient lighting.
    If you want to catch correct ambient lighting (e.g., a person posing against the city lights) with flash, yup a tripod is best. However, for indoor shots of running kids, slow shutter speed will blur all motion. You should try using high ISO, perhaps 400 and above, and in M mode, use the smallest fstop tolerable, and set the slowest shutter speed you can handhold (general guide is 1/focal length). Ideally, the exposure should be about -2 ev or so compared to the ambient lightings, so that some ambient lighting can be captured, while giving good flash exposure to your main subjects. Not all situations you have to make sure the ambient comes up perfectly.

  13. #13

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    read tweed's advice again...
    and yes, there should be some blur at 1/2s shutter speed,
    so just set at a slightly higher shutter speed in M mode, usually 1/15 to 1/30, and let the flsah take over...

    but if you want to include an element of movement, set to AV (this should give u the correct ambient light exposure, provided you meter correctly), and set your flash for fill (i.e. -1/3 or -1/2 of -2/3 stop etc). this is a bit dicey but gives more natural shots...also watch the orange cast if you shoot under tungsten or halogen light sources....

    happy shooting

  14. #14
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    Thanks guys!!!

    Will try out on my little gal again!

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