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Thread: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

  1. #181

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by jeanie View Post
    please my dear friend...
    unless i get retrenched one day, else, photography will never be my consideration for putting food on my table.
    i really only love photography for the fun of it.

    there are also many people out there who has high end equipment and yet they dont shoot for $.
    I prefer to do a job I like.
    Seems like a waste to let the equipment not used to full capacity

    Anyway, good luck in your hobby then.

  2. #182

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by chanjyj View Post
    I prefer to do a job I like.
    Seems like a waste to let the equipment not used to full capacity

    Anyway, good luck in your hobby then.
    thanks for all help and guidance.
    appreciated

  3. #183

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by jeanie View Post
    thanks for all help and guidance.
    appreciated
    I think by posting some of your nice wedding photos people can help you better...

  4. #184

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Potter View Post
    I think by posting some of your nice wedding photos people can help you better...
    nah...mine are amateurish pics not worth wasting bandwidth.

  5. #185

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    When shooting digital, there is absolutely no reason not to use manual.
    Please let me explain.

    The metering of the camera works by taking a reflected reading of subjects that may be black, white, grey or a mixture of colors and tones. This means it is not able to give an objective exposure. As such, within a scene, like a bedroom room, the exposure of each shot might be different.

    I prefer to work by setting the exposure based on the light source and then compensatating mentally when necessary.For years, photographers have shot outdoors with the sunny 16 rule, increasing exposure when under shade.

    The truth is that the light in a given scene really doesn't change that much. By using P or A, the meter might be fooled into using a slow shutter - which means motion blur.

    I was shooting on a movie set. Had ISO 1000, f2.8 and 250. I let the images underexpose a little, and push in post (RAW). I find that this is better than having the correct exposure but blurred pictures. When shooting digital, it is better to be slightly underexposed rather than over exposed. This is opposite to film.

    The logic to using Manual mode is for the photographer to be constantly thinking and being aware of what is happening around him/her. With digital, you can always do a test shot to determine exposure, and make adjustments mentally when you frame a darker or lighter scene. A good photographer should always know where the ballpark of exposure should be. He should already set his camera according to the scene just like how our eye iris constrict and dilate when we enter rooms of different brightness.

    There are advantages to the Auto ISO and P mode but in my opinion, the photographer's judgement is more accurate than that of the reflected meter.

    If you have a incident meter, even better ! Check the weather when you arrive at the scene.

    The concept to grab is : expose for the light, compensate for shadows when necessary.
    But avoid exposing entirely for shadows. We measure light. Not darkness.

  6. #186
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    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by timothychanzl View Post
    When shooting digital, there is absolutely no reason not to use manual.
    Please let me explain.

    The metering of the camera works by taking a reflected reading of subjects that may be black, white, grey or a mixture of colors and tones. This means it is not able to give an objective exposure. As such, within a scene, like a bedroom room, the exposure of each shot might be different.

    I prefer to work by setting the exposure based on the light source and then compensatating mentally when necessary.For years, photographers have shot outdoors with the sunny 16 rule, increasing exposure when under shade.

    The truth is that the light in a given scene really doesn't change that much. By using P or A, the meter might be fooled into using a slow shutter - which means motion blur.

    I was shooting on a movie set. Had ISO 1000, f2.8 and 250. I let the images underexpose a little, and push in post (RAW). I find that this is better than having the correct exposure but blurred pictures. When shooting digital, it is better to be slightly underexposed rather than over exposed. This is opposite to film.

    The logic to using Manual mode is for the photographer to be constantly thinking and being aware of what is happening around him/her. With digital, you can always do a test shot to determine exposure, and make adjustments mentally when you frame a darker or lighter scene. A good photographer should always know where the ballpark of exposure should be. He should already set his camera according to the scene just like how our eye iris constrict and dilate when we enter rooms of different brightness.

    There are advantages to the Auto ISO and P mode but in my opinion, the photographer's judgement is more accurate than that of the reflected meter.

    If you have a incident meter, even better ! Check the weather when you arrive at the scene.

    The concept to grab is : expose for the light, compensate for shadows when necessary.
    But avoid exposing entirely for shadows. We measure light. Not darkness.
    I could not have said it any better than you. This was the exact reason why I use manual settings. TTL, P, auto mode attempts to calculate the average readings of a location and hence will expose certain scenes wrongly because of uneven lightings within the location. It may also be fooled by backlighting areas. So manual is the best in my opinion

  7. #187

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by jeanie View Post
    nah...mine are amateurish pics not worth wasting bandwidth.
    I want to see leh!!!

  8. #188
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    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Potter View Post
    I want to see leh!!!
    I also want to see.

  9. #189

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by CreaXion View Post
    I could not have said it any better than you. This was the exact reason why I use manual settings. TTL, P, auto mode attempts to calculate the average readings of a location and hence will expose certain scenes wrongly because of uneven lightings within the location. It may also be fooled by backlighting areas. So manual is the best in my opinion
    For me, I use A mode with spot or centre weighted metering. I select the aperture to use, I tell the camera where to meter, and it tells me the shutter speed, if I find it acceptable, I lock it and I shoot. If not, I'll change the aperture.
    Last edited by lsisaxon; 10th July 2007 at 02:38 AM.

  10. #190

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by CreaXion View Post
    I also want to see.
    But I think we'll never see

  11. #191

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by timothychanzl View Post
    When shooting digital, there is absolutely no reason not to use manual.
    Please let me explain.

    The metering of the camera works by taking a reflected reading of subjects that may be black, white, grey or a mixture of colors and tones. This means it is not able to give an objective exposure. As such, within a scene, like a bedroom room, the exposure of each shot might be different.

    I prefer to work by setting the exposure based on the light source and then compensatating mentally when necessary.For years, photographers have shot outdoors with the sunny 16 rule, increasing exposure when under shade.

    The truth is that the light in a given scene really doesn't change that much. By using P or A, the meter might be fooled into using a slow shutter - which means motion blur.

    I was shooting on a movie set. Had ISO 1000, f2.8 and 250. I let the images underexpose a little, and push in post (RAW). I find that this is better than having the correct exposure but blurred pictures. When shooting digital, it is better to be slightly underexposed rather than over exposed. This is opposite to film.

    The logic to using Manual mode is for the photographer to be constantly thinking and being aware of what is happening around him/her. With digital, you can always do a test shot to determine exposure, and make adjustments mentally when you frame a darker or lighter scene. A good photographer should always know where the ballpark of exposure should be. He should already set his camera according to the scene just like how our eye iris constrict and dilate when we enter rooms of different brightness.

    There are advantages to the Auto ISO and P mode but in my opinion, the photographer's judgement is more accurate than that of the reflected meter.

    If you have a incident meter, even better ! Check the weather when you arrive at the scene.

    The concept to grab is : expose for the light, compensate for shadows when necessary.
    But avoid exposing entirely for shadows. We measure light. Not darkness.
    Doesn't this produce the same result as P, S, A (Or P, Tv, Av) modes with +/- compensation?

  12. #192
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by chanjyj View Post
    Doesn't this produce the same result as P, S, A (Or P, Tv, Av) modes with +/- compensation?
    if ones is able understand what metering and exposure mode about, what mode to use is just purely personal preference.

    sad to say if a photographer solely rely on P, S, A mode only, he may be less aware about exposure level around him.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
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  13. #193

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    if ones is able understand what metering and exposure mode about, what mode to use is just purely personal preference.

    sad to say if a photographer solely rely on P, S, A mode only, he may be less aware about exposure level around him.
    What do you mean by that? Can't understand your statement
    I think any photographer should know how to shoot manual in the first place then go to P, S, A (P, Tv, Av)..

  14. #194
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by chanjyj View Post
    What do you mean by that? Can't understand your statement
    I think any photographer should know how to shoot manual in the first place then go to P, S, A (P, Tv, Av)..
    when someone rely on P, S, A mode only, he may don't really know what shutter speed or aperture he is using now, cos there is no need to know, camera will decide for him.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  15. #195

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    when someone rely on P, S, A mode only, he may don't really know what shutter speed or aperture he is using now, cos there is no need to know, camera will decide for him.
    The viewfinder got show what.. As long as he not using Point and Shoot to frame the picture surely he has to look through the viewfinder?

    The only time I never look thru the viewfinder is when got bodyguard chasing me in the US

  16. #196
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by chanjyj View Post
    The viewfinder got show what.. As long as he not using Point and Shoot to frame the picture surely he has to look through the viewfinder?

    The only time I never look thru the viewfinder is when got bodyguard chasing me in the US
    not a lot of people will really want to pay attention about the readings.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
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  17. #197
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    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by chanjyj View Post
    What do you mean by that? Can't understand your statement
    I think any photographer should know how to shoot manual in the first place then go to P, S, A (P, Tv, Av)..
    Incidentally, that is not the case. Many photographers that I know never shot manual before. However, I had one friend who either use P or A and TTL. Unless he find the exposure less than satisfactory, he would then switch to Manual.

  18. #198

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by CreaXion View Post
    Incidentally, that is not the case. Many photographers that I know never shot manual before. However, I had one friend who either use P or A and TTL. Unless he find the exposure less than satisfactory, he would then switch to Manual.
    I use P almost 90%. 10% Goes to S, where I need fast shutter.

    For aperture, Nikon has the "flexi-program" within the P mode, which actually allows you to tweak Aperture and Shutter for the same reading (Like the old
    charts we used for ancient film cameras). Technically, aperture can be set in P mode. (As well as shutter, but shutter takes a darn long time to turn the dial so I will shift to S mode where my shutter is already preset at 1/500)

    To each his own, as long as the photos come out right. For the photographers who have never tried manual, I don't know how in the world they are going to do shots in a studio, or where flash is not TTL controlled.

  19. #199
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    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    could remember those were the days I started off my freelance wedding photography with films...exposure was quite consistent for Av, Tv, P..but need a lot of confidence and knowledge to shoot in manual mode.

    only with digital, pics u find exposure inconsistent on the lcd, u could easily deleted these off and try again for another shot...nice
    Last edited by SFS; 10th July 2007 at 10:40 PM.

  20. #200

    Default Re: Shooting mode for weddings actual day

    Quote Originally Posted by SFS View Post
    could remember those were the days I started off my freelance wedding photography with films...exposure was quite consistent for Av, Tv, P..but need a lot of confidence and knowledge to shoot in manual mode.

    only with digital, pics u find exposure inconsistent on the lcd, u could easily deleted these off and try again for another shot...nice
    Reminds me of my film Canon cameras
    When I first started going digital I was like WOAH! My life is easier 20 000 000 times... and I don't need 100 rolls of film with different ISO on each of them anymore

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