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Thread: B&W in camera VS photoshop conversion

  1. #1
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    Default B&W in camera VS photoshop conversion

    I wonder if there is any difference between the photo when 1)taken in B&W in the camera and when 2)taken in coloured in camera and made to B&W in photoshop.
    If there is, what is the difference and how obvious is it?

  2. #2

    Default Re: B&W in camera VS photoshop conversion

    Pls do not double post thread of similiar contents.

    Thread merged and place here.

    Regards

  3. #3
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    Default Re: B&W in camera VS photoshop conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluestrike View Post
    Pls do not double post thread of similiar contents.

    Thread merged and place here.

    Regards
    Oops... sorry, didn't know that wasn't allowed. And also becos not sure to post where.

  4. #4

    Default Re: B&W in camera VS photoshop conversion

    There are various different ways to create a digital B&W photo, the in-camera settings use one of those, with PS you have access to all of them. This by itself should tell you that it is not that great to just rely on the in-camera setting.
    The in-camera setting uses usually a simple desaturation to create B&W i.e. it just removes the colour from the file. you cannot control how colours are rendered into B&W.
    In PS gives you options to control how diffrent colours appear in B&W, like in B&W film with the usage of filters you may turn blue (or any other colour) into black or white or any grayshade inbetween. Therefore you have much more control over the process.
    A description of the different processes goes beyond this thread as it fills entire books.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: B&W in camera VS photoshop conversion

    different makers have different in-camera b&w processing.

    with PS u get more options and can control the saturation and tones.

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