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Thread: Taking pictures in low light.

  1. #21
    Senior Member
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    Default Re: Taking pictures in low light.

    Quote Originally Posted by lkkang View Post
    I always carry some pegs ( used for hanging cloths ) around when shooting leaves. Use the pegs to secure the subject..to your tripot. Choose those bigger diameter ones.. not the wooden ones.
    I never thought of this when i go and buy the plamp.. haiz.. wasted $70 bucks.

  2. #22
    Senior Member xunjas's Avatar
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    Dec 2006
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    Default Re: Taking pictures in low light.

    Quote Originally Posted by lkkang View Post
    I always carry some pegs ( used for hanging cloths ) around when shooting leaves. Use the pegs to secure the subject..to your tripot. Choose those bigger diameter ones.. not the wooden ones.
    wow.. u use the pegs to secure the leaves corners izit? never try before so not too sure on how to get it done correctly..

  3. #23

    Default Re: Taking pictures in low light.

    wats da difference between macro n zoom lens?

  4. #24
    Member/Tangshooter
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    Jan 2007
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    Default Re: Taking pictures in low light.

    Quote Originally Posted by wan View Post
    wats da difference between macro n zoom lens?
    It is more meaningful when you are using film.. The original macro photography means that you are able to take pictures that are of a scale of greater than 1:1 size on your film. Meaning that if the fly that you are capturing measures 5mm ( actual fly size ), when you use a macro lens, you should be able to capture a 5mm fly image measured on your negative film itself or bigger ( depending on the scale ratio ).

    Zoom lens meaning that the lens is capable of providing a variable focuing distance, for example : 35-70mm zoom lens, that means you are able to use this lens from 35mm to 70mm. This has nothing to do with macro at all.

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