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Thread: side bouncing flash

  1. #1

    Default side bouncing flash

    I have seen photographers tilting the flash to fire out and away from the subject in studio shots...can anybody explain why???

  2. #2
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    Default

    maybe trying to highligh one side of the face and also to prevent casting shadows behind?
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  3. #3
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    If you see studio strobes on softboxes and umbrellas there, the reason is simple. These strobes have built-in slave units. They will fire in unison with any flash of light.

    The photographer would probably want the studio strobes to be the subject's main light source, along with all the key light, fill light, hair light, background light, and backlight.

    By tilting the flash head AWAY from the subject, it is not as affected by the camera's flash, but will still trigger the studio strobes.

    Some people also use an IR flash trigger to do the same thing.

    Regards
    CK

  4. #4

    Default

    Originally posted by ckiang


    The photographer would probably want the studio strobes to be the subject's main light source, along with all the key light, fill light, hair light, background light, and backlight.



    Regards
    CK
    On this subject, any DIY on making a simple studio strobes...

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by Paladin


    On this subject, any DIY on making a simple studio strobes...
    Get a really powerful flash, like the Vivitar 285HV or if you are feeling rich, the Canon 550EX.

    Get an umbrella meant for flashes. Cost : ~$30+

    Get an adaptor to hold both the flash and umbrella. Cost : ~$30+

    Get a slave unit for the flash(es).

    Get a stand for the flashes.

    That's about all you need. Then read up on lighting (I am no expert here) and experiment.

    Regards
    CK

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