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Thread: multiple exposure

  1. #1

    Default multiple exposure

    Hi guys would like to ask how do i do multiple exposure?

    i love to take landscape photos and seems like it's either my sky is overexposed, where my buildings will look fine, or my sky looking fine while my buildings are overexposed.

    Heard that i'll have to do multiple exposure to get a good shot, but i'm not sure how to do it..

    Anyone can help?

  2. #2

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    film or digital?
    make & model of camera?

  3. #3

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    multipls exposures are for film, in the digital world now, our "multiple exposure" is actually combining 2 images into 1 overlaying each other hope this clears some confusion
    Canon 400D:18-55:75-300:50F1.8:tokina 28-70F2.8:
    msn - viroxmk5@hotmail.com

  4. #4

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    digital, canon eos400d

    oh, so whats the actual term for it? and how to i do it?
    sounds like i'll have to take 2 photos?

  5. #5

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    i kinda get what you're asking... as with most landscape shots during the day, there is a big disparity between the exposure value between the sky and the intended landscape to be captured. i'm guessing you want to retain details for both and would need two shots, one exposed for the sky and the other exposed for the landscape.

    yes, with some post-processing work that is possible, if you can keep rather still and capture the same exact frame with different exposure values, you can combine the two layers together during post process to get a well balanced image having correct exposure for both the sky and landscape.

    that being said you need a fair bit of work during post processing to get the look just right.

  6. #6
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: multiple exposure

    Hi wdEvA,

    "Multiple exposure" generally refers more to exposing different scenes onto the same frame rather then for correcting the situation you're referring to.

    The problem you refer to is caused by insufficient dynamic range of your camera to capture the lighting condition of the scene. Most digital cameras have about 5 stops of dynamic range, going beyond that and clipping would occurs (the brighter parts become overexposed while the darker parts become underexposed).

    To cover the larger dynamic range, one way is that you could take 2 shots of the same scene, one with higher exposure setting and the other lower. You can then carefully combine the 2 shots using photoshop.

    Another way is the HDR (high dynamic range) method. Here you can either use the bracketing function of the camera to take a few shots (from 2-7) using different exposures, or do manual bracketing yourself. These shots are then post processed by an HDR software like Photomatrix or CS2 to form an HDR photo.

    You can refer to Photomatrix website for more info on HDR. Read this article on Luminous Landscape to see how to do it on CS2. There are also many very well taken HDR pics in our Landscape photo gallery.

    Besides these methods, the Fuji F3pro/F5pro DSLRs also offer greater dynamic range that could help to overcome such tricky lighting conditions.

    Cheers.
    Last edited by ziploc; 24th April 2007 at 12:35 AM.

  7. #7

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    for the 1st method, i'll have to remain still to capture the same image with different exposure right?

    as for the 2nd method, i under that using the auto bracketing function, it'll capture 3 pics with standard, brighter and darker pics right? after that which i'll use photomatrix to combine them?

    how do i go about doing manual bracketing?

    Thanks

  8. #8

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by SnapJaX View Post
    multipls exposures are for film,
    Not true. Check your manuals, some DSLRs are able to do multiple exposure. A few have a dedicated mode/button just for this while others, you need to dive into multiple layers of the menu to gain access.

  9. #9
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: multiple exposure

    Yes you'll need to use a tripod to take the multiple shots, otherwise you'll have problem combining them later.

    With auto bracketing, you can set the number of stops (in ev) you want to bracket. Most entry to mid range dslr can only bracket 3 frames. For example, if you set the auto bracketing to 1ev, then the camera will bracket using +1ev, 0, -1ev.

    For manual bracketing you can keep either the shutter or aperture constant and adjust the other (you can use iso but the noise level will be different). For example, if the meter says f/8 1/500s, if you want to bracket 5 frames with 1ev step, you can use manual mode and keep the shutter at 1/500s and shoot at f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, and f/16. Alternatively you can also use the exposure compensation function to backet your shots in aperture or shutter priority mode, by dailing in the compensation for each shot (so for the example above, you would dial in +2ev, +1ev, 0, -1ev, -2ev).
    Last edited by ziploc; 24th April 2007 at 01:01 AM.

  10. #10

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    Thanks, guess i'll have to get a tripod real soon, and a shutter release cable too?

    From the link u gave me, it seems like it's better to adjust the shutter speed to get the different exposure rather than changing the aperture, as the field of depth will be affected??

    does the tutorial on photoshop CS2 works the same on CS3?

    btw, for the photos, i'll have to take them in RAW format right?
    Last edited by wdEvA; 24th April 2007 at 01:19 AM.

  11. #11
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: multiple exposure

    Yes that's right, varying the aperture will change DOF. If you're taking landscape pic with objects very far away then this won't be an issue. But if you're shooting cityscape then you'd probably want to change the shutter speed instead.

    I do not have CS3, but my guess is should be the same. You do not need to shoot in RAW to make HDR pics.
    Last edited by ziploc; 24th April 2007 at 01:30 AM.

  12. #12

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by ziploc View Post
    "Multiple exposure" generally refers more to exposing different scenes onto the same frame rather then for correcting the situation you're referring to.
    . multiple exposure is for creativity. eg flashlight photography.

    it was first introduced on film slr where the film will not advance resulting to overlapping of images in one frame.

    but nowadays these function are rarely used because of the advent of computer/ps manipulation.

    nikon D80 has multiple exposure mode.

  13. #13

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    okie thanks,
    hmm how do i choose a tripod? and as for the shutter release cable, is it okie to get a 3rd party one from the Massorder section? or it's best to get an original canon cable?

  14. #14
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    Default Re: multiple exposure

    Hi SnapJax,

    I think you are mixed up. Multiple Exposure is still the term for taking more than 1 exposure and combine them, even in digital age, at least Nikon still call it that way. And, if you are doing double exposure an object in different location (like double exposure of a same person) there are some setting to tweak, not just normal exposure. See below, manual for D80:



    Quote Originally Posted by SnapJaX View Post
    multipls exposures are for film, in the digital world now, our "multiple exposure" is actually combining 2 images into 1 overlaying each other hope this clears some confusion

  15. #15
    Moderator ortega's Avatar
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    Default Re: multiple exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by wdEvA View Post
    okie thanks,
    hmm how do i choose a tripod?
    http://forum.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=129882

  16. #16

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    thanks

  17. #17

    Default Re: multiple exposure

    hmm i'm having a v. tight budget after getting my cam.. what will be the cheapest recommendation on a tripod for landscape photos?

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