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Thread: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

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    Default Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Va. Tech gunman writings raised concerns By ADAM GELLER, AP National Writer
    20 minutes ago



    BLACKSBURG, Va. - The gunman suspected of carrying out the Virginia Tech massacre that left 33 people dead was described Tuesday as a sullen loner whose creative writing in English class was so disturbing that he was referred to the school's counseling service.

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    News reports also said that he may have been taking medication for depression, that he was becoming increasingly violent and erratic, and that he left a note in his dorm in which he railed against "rich kids," "debauchery" and "deceitful charlatans" on campus.

    Cho Seung-Hui, a 23-year-old senior majoring in English, arrived in the United States as boy from South Korea in 1992 and was raised in suburban Washington, D.C., officials said. He was living on campus in a different dorm from the one where Monday's bloodbath began.

    Police and university officials offered no clues as to exactly what set him off on the deadliest shooting rampage in modern U.S. history.

    "He was a loner, and we're having difficulty finding information about him," school spokesman Larry Hincker said.

    On Tuesday afternoon, thousands of people gathered in the basketball arena, and when it filled up, thousands more filed into the football stadium, for a memorial service for the victims. President Bush and the first lady attended.

    Virginia Tech President Charles Steger received a 30-second standing ovation, despite bitter complaints from parents and students that the university should have locked down the campus immediately after the first burst of gunfire. Steger expressed hope that "we will awaken from this horrible nightmare."

    "As you draw closer to your families in the coming days, I ask you to reach out to those who ache for sons and daughters who are never coming home," Bush said.

    A vast portrait of the victims began to emerge, among them: Christopher James Bishop, 35, who taught German at Virginia Tech and helped oversee an exchange program with a German university; Ryan "Stack" Clark, a 22-year-old student from Martinez, Ga., who was in the marching band and was working toward degrees in biology and English; Emily Jane Hilscher, a 19-year-old freshman from Woodville, Va., who was majoring in animal and poultry sciences and, naturally, loved animals; and Liviu Librescu, an Israeli engineering and math lecturer who was said to have protected his students' lives by blocking the doorway of his classroom from the approaching gunman.

    Meanwhile, a chilling portrait of the gunman as a misfit began to emerge.

    Professor Carolyn Rude, chairwoman of the university's English department, said she did not know Cho. But she said she spoke with Lucinda Roy, the department's director of creative writing, who had Cho in one of her classes and described him as "troubled."

    "There was some concern about him," Rude said. "Sometimes, in creative writing, people reveal things and you never know if it's creative or if they're describing things, if they're imagining things or just how real it might be. But we're all alert to not ignore things like this."

    She said Cho was referred to the counseling service, but she said she did not know when, or what the outcome was. Rude refused to release any of his writings or his grades, citing privacy laws.

    The Chicago Tribune reported on its Web site that he left a note in his dorm room that included a rambling list of grievances. Citing unidentified sources, the Tribune said he had recently shown troubling signs, including setting a fire in a dorm room and stalking some women.

    ABC, citing law enforcement sources, reported that the note, several pages long, explains Cho's actions and says, "You caused me to do this."

    Investigators believe Cho at some point had been taking medication for depression, the Tribune reported.

    Classmates said that on the first day of an introduction to British literature class last year, the 30 or so English students went around and introduced themselves. When it was Cho's turn, he didn't speak.

    The professor looked at the sign-in sheet and, where everyone else had written their names, Cho had written a question mark. "Is your name, `Question mark?'" classmate Julie Poole recalled the professor asking. The young man offered little response.

    Cho spent much of that class sitting in the back of the room, wearing a hat and seldom participating. In a small department, Cho distinguished himself for being anonymous. "He didn't reach out to anyone. He never talked," Poole said.

    "We just really knew him as the question mark kid," Poole said.

    The rampage consisted of two attacks, more than two hours apart — first at a dormitory, where two people were killed, then inside a classroom building, where 31 people, including Cho, died after being locked inside, Virginia State Police said. Cho committed suicide; two handguns — a 9 mm and a .22-caliber — were found in the classroom building.

    One law enforcement official said Cho's backpack contained a receipt for a March purchase of a Glock 9 mm pistol. Cho held a green card, meaning he was a legal, permanent resident, federal officials said. That meant he was eligible to buy a handgun unless he had been convicted of a felony.

    Roanoke Firearms owner John Markell said his shop sold the Glock and a box of practice ammo to Cho 36 days ago for $571.

    "He was a nice, clean-cut college kid. We won't sell a gun if we have any idea at all that a purchase is suspicious," Markell said. Markell said it is not unusual for college kids to make purchases at his shop as long as they are old enough.

    "To find out the gun came from my shop is just terrible," Markell said.

    Investigators stopped short of saying Cho carried out both attacks. But ballistics tests show one gun was used in both, Virginia State Police said.

    And two law enforcement officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because the information had not been announced, said Cho's fingerprints were found on both guns. The serial numbers on the two weapons had been filed off, the officials said.

    Col. Steve Flaherty, superintendent of the Virginia State Police, said it was reasonable to assume that Cho was the shooter in both attacks but that the link was not yet definitive. "There's no evidence of any accomplice at either event, but we're exploring the possibility," he said.

    Officials said Cho graduated from Westfield High School in Chantilly, Va., in 2003. His family lived in an off-white, two-story townhouse in Centreville, Va.

    Two of those killed in the shooting rampage, Reema Samaha and Erin Peterson, graduated from Westfield High in 2006, school officials said. But there was no immediate word from authorities on whether Cho knew the two young women and singled them out.

    "He was very quiet, always by himself," neighbor Abdul Shash said. Shash said Cho spent a lot of his free time playing basketball and would not respond if someone greeted him. He described the family as quiet.

    South Korea expressed its condolences, and said it hoped that the tragedy would not "stir up racial prejudice or confrontation." "We are in shock beyond description," said Cho Byung-se, a Foreign Ministry official handling North American affairs.

    Classes were canceled for the rest of the week. Norris Hall, the classroom building, will be closed for the rest of the semester.

    Many students were leaving town quickly, lugging pillows, sleeping bags and backpacks down the sidewalks.

    Jessie Ferguson, 19, a freshman from Arlington, left Newman Hall and headed for her car with tears streaming down her red cheeks.

    "I'm still kind of shaky," she said. "I had to pump myself up just to kind of come out of the building. I was going to come out, but it took a little bit of 'OK, it's going to be all right. There's lots of cops around.'"

    Although she wanted to be with friends, she wanted her family more. "I just don't want to be on campus," she said.

    Until Monday, the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history was in Killeen, Texas, in 1991, when George Hennard plowed his pickup truck into a Luby's Cafeteria and shot 23 people to death, then himself.

    Previously, the deadliest campus shooting in U.S. history was a rampage that took place in 1966 at the University of Texas at Austin, where Charles Whitman climbed the clock tower and opened fire with a rifle from the 28th-floor observation deck. He killed 16 people before he was shot to death by police.

    ___

    Associated Press writers Stephen Manning in Centreville, Va.; Matt Barakat in Richmond, Va.; and Vicki Smith, Sue Lindsey and Justin Pope in Blacksburg contributed to this report.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Fatalities
    This is a partial list and only includes victims who have been specifically named in the media.


    First shooting: West Ambler Johnston Hall Dormitory
    Both of these victims were students.


    Ryan Clark, 22, a senior from Martinez, Georgia (a suburb of Augusta), triple-majoring in Biology, English, and Psychology. A resident advisor at the West Ambler Johnston Hall Dormitory, Clark was killed in the dormitory as he rushed over to investigate what was going on and came upon the shooter.

    Emily J. Hilscher, 19, a freshman from Woodville in Rappahannock County, Virginia. The first victim, she was Cho's supposed girlfriend. He shot her when he discovered that she had been cheating on him. (She is not from what News put)

    Second shooting: Norris Hall Engineering Building

    [edit] Students
    Ross Abdallah Alameddine, 20, a sophomore from Saugus, Massachusetts, United States.

    Brian Bluhm, a graduate student in Civil Engineering.

    Caitlin Hammaren, 19, a sophomore from Westtown, New York, United States in International Studies and French.

    Jeremy Herbstritt, 27, a graduate student from Bellefonte, Pennsylvania.

    Matthew La Porte, 22, a freshman from Dumont, New Jersey, United States in University Studies.

    Jarrett Lane, a senior from Narrows, Virginia, United States in Civil Engineering

    Henry Lee, a freshman from Roanoke, Virginia, United States in Computer Engineering.

    Daniel Patrick O'Neil, a graduate student from Lincoln, Rhode Island, United States.

    Juan Ramon Ortiz, 26, a graduate student from Bayamon, Puerto Rico, in Civil Engineering.

    Daniel Pérez Cueva, 21, a student from Lima, Peru in International Relations.

    Erin Peterson, 18, a freshman.

    Mary Karen Read, 19, a freshman from Annandale, Virginia, United States.

    Reema Joseph Samaha, a freshman from Centreville, Virginia, United States.

    Leslie Sherman, a sophomore from Springfield, Virginia, United States in History and International Studies.

    Maxine Turner, a senior from Vienna, Virginia, United States in Chemical Engineering.

    Faculty
    Christopher Jamie Bishop, 35, Instructor, Foreign Languages and Literatures (German (son of author Michael Bishop), and alumnus of the University of Georgia

    Jocelyne Couture-Nowak, Professor, Foreign Languages. A French instructor from Montréal, Quebec, Canada.

    Kevin Granata, 45, Professor, Engineering Science & Mechanics.

    Liviu Librescu, 76, Professor, Engineering Science & Mechanics, and Holocaust survivor. Killed while holding off the shooter so his students could escape out the window.
    (I said this guy is a hero...)


    G. V. Loganathan, 51, Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_Tech_massacre
    Last edited by Lord_Angelus; 18th April 2007 at 03:27 AM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    violent video games to be blame? there is no news if the South Koern shooter plays violent video games. Dr. Phil McGraw appeared on CNN's Larry King Live blaming violent video games make this people becomes shooter like what happen in Columbine and in others.

    What do you think?

    I play violent games but I do not see how it is can make a person go all the way to do that. RPG have been blame ones for people killing one and other.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Violent games contribute to our psyche, and so does everything else that we experience from birth- friends, schools, family, books, movies, magazines, traumatic experiences, etc. The right combination of these factors could mean that violent games contribute negatively in select individuals, but to call them (the games) the root cause of society's problems is just stupid and lazy.
    Last edited by jmmtn4aj; 18th April 2007 at 04:21 AM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member wrx_sti_22b's Avatar
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    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    The teachers who died so poor thing... i mean other fellow students who died also lah... but somehow my heart goes out to the teachers...

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    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Liberal gun laws... You can buy a Glock 9mm for less then the price of a DSLR!

    Condolences to the victims.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    .S. gun laws draw heat after massacre By PAISLEY DODDS
    48 minutes ago



    LONDON - The Virginia Tech shootings sparked criticism of U.S. gun control laws around the world Tuesday. Editorials lashed out at the availability of weapons, and the leader of Australia — one of America's closest allies — declared that America's gun culture was costing lives.

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    South Korea's Foreign Ministry said the government hoped Monday's shootings, allegedly carried out by a 23-year-old South Korean native, would not "stir up racial prejudice or confrontation."

    While some focused blame only on the gunman, world opinion over U.S. gun laws was almost unanimous: Access to weapons increases the probability of shootings. There was no sympathy for the view that more guns would have saved lives by enabling students to shoot the assailant.

    "We took action to limit the availability of guns and we showed a national resolve that the gun culture that is such a negative in the United States would never become a negative in our country," said Australian Prime Minister John Howard, who staked his political career on promoting tough gun laws after a gunman went on one of the world's deadliest killing sprees 11 years ago.

    The tragedy in a Tasmanian tourist resort left 35 people dead. Afterward, Australia's gun laws were changed to prohibit automatic weapons and handguns and toughen licensing and storage restrictions.

    Handguns are also banned in Britain — a prohibition that forces even the country's Olympic pistol shooting team from practicing on its own soil. In Sweden, civilians can acquire firearm permits only if they have a hunting license or are members of a shooting club and have no criminal record. In Italy, people must have a valid reason for wanting one. Firearms are forbidden for private Chinese citizens.

    Still, leaders from Britain, Germany, Mexico, China, Afghanistan and France stopped short of criticizing President Bush or U.S. gun laws when they offered sympathies to the families of Monday's victims.

    Editorials were less diplomatic.

    "Only the names change — And the numbers," read a headline in the Times of London. "Why, we ask, do Americans continue to tolerate gun laws and a culture that seems to condemn thousands of innocents to death every year, when presumably, tougher restrictions, such as those in force in European countries, could at least reduce the number?"

    The French daily Le Monde said the regularity of mass shootings across the Atlantic was a blotch on America's image.

    "It would be unjust and especially false to reduce the United States to the image created, in a recurrent way, from the bursts of murderous fury that some isolated individuals succumb to. But acts like this are rare elsewhere, and tend to often disfigure the 'American dream.'"

    Police started identifying the victims Tuesday. One was a Peruvian student identified as Daniel Perez Cueva, 21, according to his mother Betty Cuevas, who said her son was studying international relations.

    Professors from India, Israel and Canada also were killed.

    Liviu Librescu, 76, an engineering science and mathematics lecturer, tried to stop the gunman from entering his classroom by blocking the door before he was fatally shot, his son said Tuesday from Tel Aviv.

    "My father blocked the doorway with his body and asked the students to flee," Joe Librescu said. His father, a Holocaust survivor, immigrated to Israel from Romania, and was on sabbatical in Virginia.

    Indian-born G.V. Loganathan, 51, a lecturer at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, was also among the dead, his brother G.V. Palanivel told Indian media.

    "We all feel like we have had an electric shock. We do not know what to do," Palanivel said.

    Canadian Jocelyn Couture-Nowak, a French instructor, also died in the shootings, said her husband Jerzy Nowak, head of the university's horticulture department. "We're mourning," Nowak said.

    The killings also hit a nerve for Virginia Tech alumni abroad.

    "I think if this does prompt a serious and reflective debate on gun issues and gun law in the States, then some good may come from this woeful tragedy," said British Home Office Minister Tony McNulty, who graduated in 1982.

    Britain's 46 homicides involving firearms last year was the lowest since the late 1980s. New York City, with 8 million people compared to 53 million in England and Wales, recorded 590 homicides last year.

    "If the guns are harder to get a hold of, fewer people will do it," said Michael Dent, a 65-year-old construction worker in London. "You can't walk up to a supermarket or shop and buy a gun like in the States."

    But even in Germany, where gun-control laws are strict, a teenager in 2002 shot and killed 12 teachers, a secretary, two students and a police officer at a high school. The shooter was a gun club member licensed to own weapons. The attack led Germany to raise the age for owning recreational firearms from 18 to 21.

    "The instant I saw the pictures and heard the commentary, it immediately brought back our own experience," Gutenberg high school director Christiane Alt said of the Virginia Tech killings.

    The Swedish daily Goteborgs-Posten said without access to weapons, the killings at Virginia Tech may have been prevented.

    "What exactly triggered the massacre in Virginia is unclear, but the fundamental reason is often the perpetrator's psychological problems in combination with access to weapons," it wrote.

    The shootings drew intense media coverage in China, in part because the school has a large Chinese student body.

    "This incident reflects the problem of gun control in America," Yuan Peng, an American studies expert in China, was quoted as saying by state-run China Daily.

    Only 7 percent of the more than 26,000 students at Virginia Tech are foreign, according to the school Web site. But Chinese make up nearly a third of that.

    In Italy, there are three types of licenses for gun ownership: for personal safety, target practice and skeet shooting, and hunting. Authorization is granted by the police. To obtain a gun for personal safety, the owner must be an adult and have a "valid" reason.

    Italy's leading daily Corriere della Sera's main story on the shootings was an opinion piece entitled "Guns at the Supermarket" — a critical view of the U.S. gun lobby and the ease with which guns can be purchased. State-run RAI radio also discussed at length what it said were lax standards for gun ownership in the United States.

    "The latest attack on a U.S. campus will shake up America, maybe it will provoke more vigorous reactions than in the past, but it won't change the culture of a country that has the notion of self-defense imprinted on its DNA and which considers the right of having guns inalienable," Corriere wrote in its front-page story.

    Several Italian graduate students at Virginia Tech recounted how they barricaded themselves inside a geology department building not far from the scene of the shooting.

    In Mexico, radio commentators criticized the availability of firearms in the U.S. Others renewed Mexico's complaint that most guns in Mexico are smuggled in from the United States.

    The killings led newspapers' front pages, with Mexico City's Dario Monitor reporting: "Terror returns to the U.S.: 32 assassinated on university campus." The tabloid Metro compared Mexico's death toll Monday from drug violence to the number of people killed at Virginia Tech, in a front-page headline that read: "U.S. 33, Mexico 20."
    Last edited by Lord_Angelus; 18th April 2007 at 12:05 PM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Many of the kid killers told Secret Service investigators that feelings of alienation or persecution drove them to violence. Instead of looking for traits, the Secret Service urges adults to ask about behavior: "What has this child said? Do they have grievances? What do their friends know? Do they have access to weapons? Are they depressed or despondent?

  9. #9

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord_Angelus View Post
    Many of the kid killers told Secret Service investigators that feelings of alienation or persecution drove them to violence. Instead of looking for traits, the Secret Service urges adults to ask about behavior: "What has this child said? Do they have grievances? What do their friends know? Do they have access to weapons? Are they depressed or despondent?
    What's secret service got to do with this?

  10. #10
    Member Parka's Avatar
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    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    If they just ban those guns, there won't be incidents like college shooting rampage anymore.
    I think the chances of this happening in Singapore is almost zero.

    The last one at Columbine is still pretty fresh in memory.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Quote Originally Posted by Parka View Post
    If they just ban those guns, there won't be incidents like college shooting rampage anymore.
    I think the chances of this happening in Singapore is almost zero.

    The last one at Columbine is still pretty fresh in memory.
    Guns ARE banned in universities. And by the way, it isn't actually that hard to acquire a gun here. Culture people, culture.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Quote Originally Posted by jmmtn4aj View Post
    Guns ARE banned in universities. And by the way, it isn't actually that hard to acquire a gun here. Culture people, culture.
    Banned in universities and banned in countries are two different things.

    Seriously, it's not hard to get a gun in Singapore?

  13. #13

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Quote Originally Posted by Parka View Post
    Banned in universities and banned in countries are two different things.

    Seriously, it's not hard to get a gun in Singapore?
    You honestly think it is? Anyone can take a drive to Thailand or Malaysia, purchase one, then bring it back. If you haven't noticed, customs don't regular do x-rays of cars.

    Do you really think that crime rates will go down in the US if guns were outlawed? I mean assuming it's even possible to do such a thing without mayhem.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Quote Originally Posted by jmmtn4aj View Post
    You honestly think it is? Anyone can take a drive to Thailand or Malaysia, purchase one, then bring it back. If you haven't noticed, customs don't regular do x-rays of cars.

    Do you really think that crime rates will go down in the US if guns were outlawed? I mean assuming it's even possible to do such a thing without mayhem.
    Now, now. You wouldn't want to be caught with a firearm in SG...

  15. #15

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    If that kid knew how to make a bomb.... give it a thought.

    Don't blame the weapons because they do not have a mind of their own... look at us Singaporeans, every able bodied man handles assault rifles for crying out loud. If there is a depressed person among the platoon, imagine what happens during live firing. Worse still, he is the one who has been at the ammo point loading the rounds and have magazines upon magazines of loaded copperheads. All he needs is for someone to crack him, and he picks up an assault rifle...

    About the VTech shooter... I believe it is the environment that he lived in... I believe he has been made to feel small and inadequate before by people around him, else he would not have been suffering from depression and isolate himself from the rest of society.

    Who likes being alone for an extended period of time?

    Anyway, it is heart breaking to see these incidents happening, and they are happening more and more regularly it seems, and hundreds of other incidents in small towns in various parts of the world which is not widely reported.

    Hacking families and strangers to death, genocide, etc... this is the world we live in... sigh.

    And we should sometimes think... do we have to be that nasty sometimes??

  16. #16

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Quote Originally Posted by drakon09 View Post
    Now, now. You wouldn't want to be caught with a firearm in SG...
    No, no you wouldn't.

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    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Quote Originally Posted by microcosm View Post
    Don't blame the weapons because they do not have a mind of their own... look at us Singaporeans, every able bodied man handles assault rifles for crying out loud. If there is a depressed person among the platoon, imagine what happens during live firing. Worse still, he is the one who has been at the ammo point loading the rounds and have magazines upon magazines of loaded copperheads. All he needs is for someone to crack him, and he picks up an assault rifle...
    I believe in our history.... it has ever happened once before. Can't remember the exact date.... a long time ago. But definitely not 33 killed.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    Actually i remember in the army there was one recruit who went psycho and turned his weapon on his instructor at the range. Don't know whether that story is true or not.

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    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    not the video game's fault...a sensible and affectionate person can tell what's reality and what's virtual...not the law's fault...no guns so what? parang knives or samurai swords works shocking brutal wonders too...perhaps it's the fellow's parent upbringing method fault... maybe strict family rules...depression...so called mama boy syndrome... then maybe he don't know where to vent his frustration so maybe shooting is a relieve for him... those victims rest in peace...
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    Default Re: Virginia Tech student's shooting rampage killed 33 people

    I am right now at Canada, and based on what the local papers here are reporting, the shooter had IMO, an serious inferior complex. When people reached out to him, neighbours or anyone, he never talked nor respond. Now this is a real psychotic case.
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