Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 48 of 48

Thread: Sunny f/16 and f/22 Rule

  1. #41

    Default Re: Sunny f/16 and f/22 Rule

    Hi All, just up this thread.. i am a bit confused..in a beach or snow scene, we change to f22..are we supposed to exposure 1 stops or 2 stops more in white sand or snow scene?



    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    The Sunny f16 is also call the "Basic Daylight Exposure".

    on the Sunny day (subject under sunlight with distinct shadows), you will get a lens aperture of f16, with the shutter speed same or close to your medium ISO, eg, 1/125s with ISO 100, 1/500 with ISO 400...etc.

    on the Sunday day but if you are at beach or snow scene, more light will get reflected by the sand, water or snow, so you will get f22 instead.

    this rule is very accurate, of course if the photographer can't differentiate between a sunny day and cloudy day, than will not get the correct results.

    print out this chart, keep one in your camera bag, it will be handy if your meter fail you.

  2. #42
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Sunny f/16 and f/22 Rule

    changing your aperture from f16 to f22 is "close down" / "cut down" one stop, in another word you are reducing the amount of light enter the lens by one stop.

    hope this is clear enough.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  3. #43
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Sunny f/16 and f/22 Rule

    btw, if you using your camera meter to do metering at the snow or beach scene (depends who much snow or sand/water subjects in your frame), you need to open up one ~ two stops (manual mode), or dial compensate dial (P, A or S mode), else you will have underexposed image, cos the meter does not know you have lot of white in your frame.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  4. #44

    Default Re: Sunny f/16 and f/22 Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    btw, if you using your camera meter to do metering at the snow or beach scene (depends who much snow or sand/water subjects in your frame), you need to open up one ~ two stops (manual mode), or dial compensate dial (P, A or S mode), else you will have underexposed image, cos the meter does not know you have lot of white in your frame.

    hi catchlights, i once notice that f/16 with 1/iso in a sunny day, match my camera meter.. but why f/22 in a beach scene? i am just trying to figure out.. it seems something is lost in rules explanation..

    mm..after some digestion, i think meter works like sunny f/16 rules when condition is normal. But meter doesn't work according to sunny f/16 rules when certain extreme condition.

  5. #45
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Sunny f/16 and f/22 Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by LENS View Post
    hi catchlights, i once notice that f/16 with 1/iso in a sunny day, match my camera meter.. but why f/22 in a beach scene? i am just trying to figure out.. it seems something is lost in rules explanation..

    mm..after some digestion, i think meter works like sunny f/16 rules when condition is normal. But meter doesn't work according to sunny f/16 rules when certain extreme condition.
    cos the camera meter read everything in mid gray, but at a beach scene, since it is lighter the mid gray, so the camera meter get fooled, so you need to open up to compensate it, that should be the correct exposure for beach scene.

    you can use a handheld meter, or using camera meter to meter a gray card at beach scene to confirm this.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  6. #46
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Hougang Ave. 7
    Posts
    888

    Default Re: Sunny f/16 and f/22 Rule

    Sunny F/16 rule follows a handheld incident light meter. Thus, it does not care what the subject is; i.e. bright or dark. It take the reading where lights falls on the subject. This is the light level we need to know to expose our medium, film or sensor, to give the image in proper expsoure.

    But camera measures reflected light like the reflected light meter. When it bounce off a light or white subject, it give off more light. Our meter is dumb, thinking everything is mid tone, will give you a reading that is under.
    When it bounce off a dark or black subject, it give off less light. Our meter is still dumb, thinking everything is mid tone, will give you a reading that is over.
    Thus, the camera meter is only good if the subject is mid-tone like green, blue and red.

  7. #47
    Member serametin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    236

    Default Re: Sunny f/16 and f/22 Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    The Sunny f16 is also call the "Basic Daylight Exposure".

    on the Sunny day (subject under sunlight with distinct shadows), you will get a lens aperture of f16, with the shutter speed same or close to your medium ISO, eg, 1/125s with ISO 100, 1/500 with ISO 400...etc.

    on the Sunday day but if you are at beach or snow scene, more light will get reflected by the sand, water or snow, so you will get f22 instead.

    this rule is very accurate, of course if the photographer can't differentiate between a sunny day and cloudy day, than will not get the correct results.

    print out this chart, keep one in your camera bag, it will be handy if your meter fail you.
    valuable info. thks

  8. #48
    Senior Member denniskee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    bukit batok
    Posts
    5,468

    Default Re: Sunny f/16 and f/22 Rule

    abit ot, not really related to sunny 16 rule.

    metering with your palm, taken off

    http://www.kodak.com/cluster/global/...f9/index.shtml

    What if you can't walk up to your subject to take a meter reading? For instance, suppose that you're trying to photograph a deer in sunlight at the edge of a wood. If the background is dark, a meter reading of the overall scene will give you an incorrect exposure for the deer. Obviously, if you try to take a close-up reading of the deer, you're going to lose your subject before you ever get the picture. One answer is to make a substitute reading off the palm of your hand, providing that your hand is illuminated by the same light as your subject, then use a lens opening 1 stop larger than the meter indicates. For example, if the reading off your hand is f/16, open up one stop to f/11 to get the correct exposure. The exposure increase is necessary because the meter overreacts to the brightness of your palm which is about twice as bright as an average subject. When you take the reading, be sure that the lighting on your palm is the same as on the subject. Don't shade your palm.
    photography makes one sees things from all angles.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •