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Thread: How to meter in such situations?

  1. #1
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    Default How to meter in such situations?

    Hi,
    Appreciate it if someone can advice on how to do metering to avoid over or under exposure in the following conditions:
    1) Bright background and dark foreground.
    eg. sunset.
    2) Bright foreground and dark background
    eg. night scene with subject in the light.

    Thanks in advance for any tips.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Quote Originally Posted by mace1980 View Post
    Hi,
    Appreciate it if someone can advice on how to do metering to avoid over or under exposure in the following conditions:
    1) Bright background and dark foreground.
    eg. sunset.
    2) Bright foreground and dark background
    eg. night scene with subject in the light.

    Thanks in advance for any tips.
    expose the highlight and push the shadow during PP... otherwise up to you to decide..

  3. #3

    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Quote Originally Posted by mace1980 View Post
    Hi,
    Appreciate it if someone can advice on how to do metering to avoid over or under exposure in the following conditions:
    1) Bright background and dark foreground.
    eg. sunset.
    2) Bright foreground and dark background
    eg. night scene with subject in the light.

    Thanks in advance for any tips.
    1) I would meter the bright background, meter the dark foreground, work out the difference and use a graduated ND filter to compensate, or take multiple exposures and blend Otherwise, I would choose what I wanted to be correctly exposed and meter and expose for that.

    2) I would meter the subject in the light and make sure that it does not overexpose, but perhaps put it as the brightest area in the scene (or just under)

  4. #4

    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Quote Originally Posted by adamadam View Post
    I would choose what I wanted to be correctly exposed and meter and expose for that.
    Best and simple answer.

    But there are tricks off camera to achieve what is not within the sensor's inherent dynamic range. And if you ask how to meter to best facilitate such off camera tricks there could be many answers.

  5. #5
    Senior Member hhho's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    I used to do spot metering in 1) Bright background and dark foreground.
    Here's an example and it works for me
    http://www.myfourthirds.com/document.php?id=33535

  6. #6
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    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    1) What effects do you want? If you want a silhouette, then you'd just meter for the background. If you want details in the foreground, then perhaps either the graduated nd or fill-in flash?

    2) just expose normally and bracket the shots?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Quote Originally Posted by adamadam View Post
    1) I would meter the bright background, meter the dark foreground, work out the difference and use a graduated ND filter to compensate, or take multiple exposures and blend Otherwise, I would choose what I wanted to be correctly exposed and meter and expose for that.

    2) I would meter the subject in the light and make sure that it does not overexpose, but perhaps put it as the brightest area in the scene (or just under)
    Adam, do you mind explaining how to go about using a graduated ND filter to compensate?
    Thanks.


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    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Quote Originally Posted by adamadam View Post
    1) I would meter the bright background, meter the dark foreground, work out the difference and use a graduated ND filter to compensate, or take multiple exposures and blend Otherwise, I would choose what I wanted to be correctly exposed and meter and expose for that.

    2) I would meter the subject in the light and make sure that it does not overexpose, but perhaps put it as the brightest area in the scene (or just under)

    Could explain further how you would go about doing 1)? I'll be getting myself a Cokin ND filter soon and would definitely like to learn more about using it properly.

  9. #9
    Senior Member jOhO's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    it depends on how u wanna shoot and what you are shooting. i can't imagine using an grad ND filter if the foregrond was a person, nor fill flash if you're shooting landscape..

    there's one "tip" that may be used sometimes, and many pple forget it:

    shoot something else, shoot sometime else, or shoot somewhere else, as the case may be. if it's a person, get them in the right light, if it's a mountain, come back another day. etc etc..

  10. #10

    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Shoot in RAW (Multiple shots or one) on a tripod, then use layers (and/or masks) in PS to blend and tweak the pictures to have the best of both worlds.

  11. #11

    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    I started typing how I do it... then got stuck (how bad is that??? haha).
    So I searched up for other people's explanation and came across these
    http://www.earthboundlight.com/photo...duated-nd.html
    http://www.great-landscape-photograp...d-filters.html

    I hope these help

    but also Joho advice is very wonderful, "come back another day" and also that the grad nd or fill flash can not be used for all situations

  12. #12

    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Quote Originally Posted by mace1980 View Post
    Hi,
    Appreciate it if someone can advice on how to do metering to avoid over or under exposure in the following conditions:
    1) Bright background and dark foreground.
    eg. sunset.
    2) Bright foreground and dark background
    eg. night scene with subject in the light.

    Thanks in advance for any tips.
    i'll shoot raw and take multiple shots with and without flash and blend in PP after.
    Leonard aka audibum
    Nikon D300|17-55 F2.8|50 F/1.4|SB-800|Fuji x-100| canon s95

  13. #13
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    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    try out all the tips above.. if they don't work..
    do HDR...

    if u have people in the image.. try taking 2 separate photos, one to expose the image properly with ND grad (without the subjects of course), another just to expose the subjects.. and combine.. but if the light is too harsh it won't look good, and this method's kind of cheating...
    Canon EOS 30D w/ grip 580EX, Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8, EF-S 10-22mm
    :bsmilie:

  14. #14

    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Quote Originally Posted by mace1980 View Post
    Hi,
    Appreciate it if someone can advice on how to do metering to avoid over or under exposure in the following conditions:
    1) Bright background and dark foreground.
    eg. sunset.
    2) Bright foreground and dark background
    eg. night scene with subject in the light.

    Thanks in advance for any tips.
    Know the limits of your equipment.

  15. #15

    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Quote Originally Posted by lsisaxon View Post
    Know the limits of your equipment.
    then know the workarounds
    It is the camera, not the photographer.
    my flickr - adamloh.com

  16. #16

    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Quote Originally Posted by jOhO View Post
    there's one "tip" that may be used sometimes, and many pple forget it:

    shoot something else, shoot sometime else, or shoot somewhere else, as the case may be. if it's a person, get them in the right light, if it's a mountain, come back another day. etc etc..
    actually this is a really good answer. also... change your angle or composition so the lighting is less challenging, move your subject or yourself to another spot. wait for lighting conditions to change (clouds) or come back at another time of the day.

    (erm... how about... shoot film)

  17. #17

    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Use multiple spot metering....

  18. #18
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    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    Quote Originally Posted by lightning View Post
    Use multiple spot metering....
    How to do that on a 400D??


  19. #19

    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    try to use use a 1 stop lower compensation. Test it out and see if this works.

  20. #20
    Senior Member jOhO's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to meter in such situations?

    mace - do you wanna tell us what it was u were shooting? as mentioned, different situations call for different methods.

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