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Thread: Nikon T4 vs Hoya Macro Lens

  1. #1
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    Default Nikon T4 vs Hoya Macro Lens

    Hi!

    Can someone tell me what is the diopter rating for the T4? Any current users can tell me more abt it?

    If you have to choose, which will u choose? Nikon T4 or the hoya?

    thank u!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Nikon T4 vs Hoya Macro Lens

    Originally posted by Wryer
    Hi!

    Can someone tell me what is the diopter rating for the T4? Any current users can tell me more abt it?

    If you have to choose, which will u choose? Nikon T4 or the hoya?

    thank u!

    nikon 4T is about +3 in diopter rating and it's a 2 element glass with size of 52mm.

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    Oh. is +3 sufficient for taking macros of insects? Or is it more worth it to get the Hoya, which is +10?

    Btw, i recieve an email saying that this thread is deleted. May i know why?

    Thanks!

  4. #4

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    cos you created the same thread again, so one is deleted

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    oh. OopS! Really sorry. Didnt notice it. Really Sorry.

    Back to qn, any users or bros can help me out with my dilemma?

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  7. #7

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    Originally posted by Wryer
    Oh. is +3 sufficient for taking macros of insects? Or is it more worth it to get the Hoya, which is +10?
    Thanks!
    This depends on what camera you're using. Wats the maximum focal length of your cam's lens?

    E.g., Having a +10 on a G2 (102mm) will give you smaller magnification compared to using a +4 on a C730 (380mm).

    Let us know your camera model so that we can advise you accordingly. And also what type of insects are you interested to take? Taking butterflies and bees, for example, require lens/filters with different diopter ratings.
    Last edited by azone; 13th March 2003 at 04:21 PM.

  8. #8

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    I guess people did not answer ur enquiry due to they dun have both Nikon T4 vs Hoya Macro Lens to compare ...

    since we know tt high end double element closeup lens like Nikon 4T, 5T, 6T and Canon 250D/500D can provide good quality , maybe u should just ask for the quality of the Hoya Macro Lens itself ...
    See my Photo Gallery at the Clubsnap

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    Erm..im using the A40..
    and i am not quite sure of its focal length. It says Normal: 76cm - infinity while for Macro: 16-76com(W),26-76cm(T).

    So is the focal length 76cm? im not too sure. So would a +3 of T4 be sufficient?

    Yup megaweb,i do understand that. But presently, i think i would think abt which diopter ratings should i go for.

    EDIT: i think i am more interested in butterflies, bees, dragon flies and some other exotic insects.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Wryer; 13th March 2003 at 04:23 PM.

  10. #10

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    Originally posted by Wryer
    Erm..im using the A40..
    and i am not quite sure of its focal length. It says Normal: 16-76cm(W) while for Macro: 26-76cm(T).

    So is the focal length 76cm? im not too sure. So would a +3 of T4 be sufficient?

    Yup megaweb,i do understand that. But presently, i think i would think abt which diopter ratings should i go for.

    EDIT: i think i am more interested in butterflies, bees, dragon flies and some other exotic insects.

    Thanks!
    Ok, now we know more abt your equipments and expectations.

    A40 has a maximum focal length of 105mm. If you wish to take a range of insects, then my advice is you'll need both a +4 and +10. +10 can be used for taking bees, grasshoppers, flies, etc. A +4 will be just nice to take dragonflies and butterflies.

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    A +10 and a +4. Thats gonna be quite expensive (still a student )

    Let me do my calculations.

    If i do get a +10 and a +4, the most economical way is to get the hoya macro lens at $45 and the +4 closeup filter at $14.

    OR.

    If i go for quality, a hoya macro +10 and the Nikon T4 (arnd $80, can someone tell me abt the price range?). tts gonna exceed my budget by quite a bit.

    OR.

    My fav. combination. The Nikon T4 and a +4 closeup filter? And i will stack them when i take bees and other smaller insects?

    Question, will a normal close-up filter be sufficient or the double element closeups be better? Is the difference discernable? I heard that using closeup filters can cause focusing to be difficult?

    Thanks!

  12. #12

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    Hmmm... since you have a tight budget, then just get 2 HOYA +4. Stack them when you need to take tiny insects, use one for taking larger ones.

    As for the quality, i think the HOYAs are quite alright. See my links below, all taken using HOYA close-up filters. Unless you have more to spend, then get the better Nikon or Canon macro lens.

    Get the HOYAs and try out 1st. If you really intend to take insect macros seriously next time, then invest in better lens or cameras.
    Last edited by azone; 13th March 2003 at 04:41 PM.

  13. #13

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    I agree with azone. Get the cheaper HOYA +4 closeup filter and try 1st. Practise until u master the skill of macro shots, then it is the time to improve ur image quality by replacing to double element closeup lens ...
    See my Photo Gallery at the Clubsnap

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    Erm...thanks azone!

    Well..guess most prob i will be going for the T4 and a additional +4 to stack when i need it.

    But well, i know its the photog is the one who makes a gd photo. And i know A40 is not the best cam for macros. Can u tell me what are the possible problems and limitationsi i may encounter?

    Im worried that after purchasing those macro closeups, i wouldnt be able to get gd insect pics cz of the low end camera.

    EDIT: But, what does it really mean to have a double element lens? Can u enlighten me?

    Is the difference discernable? I heard that using closeup filters can cause focusing to be difficult?

    Thanks!
    Special thanks to azone and megaweb, the kings of macros! :P (to those macros experts out there, sorry for nt mentioning u!)
    Last edited by Wryer; 13th March 2003 at 04:45 PM.

  15. #15

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    Originally posted by Wryer
    Erm...thanks azone!

    Well..guess most prob i will be going for the T4 and a additional +4 to stack when i need it.

    But well, i know its the photog is the one who makes a gd photo. And i know A40 is not the best cam for macros. Can u tell me what are the possible problems and limitationsi i may encounter?

    Im worried that after purchasing those macro closeups, i wouldnt be able to get gd insect pics cz of the low end camera.

    Special thanks to azone and megaweb, the kings of macros! :P
    The limitations of A40 will probably be the following:
    1) Limited manual settings (aperture values quite limited in range if i rem)
    2) No flash hotshoe for external flash
    3) 3x zoom only

    I would agree that A40 might not be able to meet your expectations if your expectations are very high. So dats why i suggested getting the cheap HOYAs to try out. IMO, getting the T4 is not exactly neccesary for you yet.

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    1) Yep, the manual features are rather limited. azone, i notice that u use pretty small apertures like f8 or 11. I thought i should use bigger ones like f3.2 or 2.8 to get the background blur?

    2) I thought of using slave flashes but...haven quite research on it yet.

    3) Yup, the 3x zoom is pretty limited. So ive gotten myself a TC to extend it to 6x!

    Btw, for macro shots, should we zoom all the way out and use a closeup filter/lens?

    Thanks!

  17. #17
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    suggest getting a Hoya +4 to try out first. It's less than 1/3 the price of the Nikon T4.
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

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    Yup mpenza, have decided to get 2 +4 Hoyas to try it out. So now trying to ask the macros experts around the skills now.

    Maybe u want share with me your experience with macros?

    Can i OT and ask abt the technique over here rather than create a new thread?

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  20. #20

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    Originally posted by Wryer
    1) Yep, the manual features are rather limited. azone, i notice that u use pretty small apertures like f8 or 11. I thought i should use bigger ones like f3.2 or 2.8 to get the background blur?

    2) I thought of using slave flashes but...haven quite research on it yet.

    3) Yup, the 3x zoom is pretty limited. So ive gotten myself a TC to extend it to 6x!

    Btw, for macro shots, should we zoom all the way out and use a closeup filter/lens?

    Thanks!
    Yes, for tiny insects, i need to use small apertures to get the insect as much in focus as possible. In high magnification, the background is easily blurred even when using small apertures. For taking butterflies, its a different story. A large aperture is used instead coz butterflies are thin.

    Fo A40, i guess you may need a flash bracket to mount a flash. But not sure if A40 has a flash sync outlet for external flash.

    When using them, you'll need to zoom in to see the effect. Using one at wide angle is as good as not using one.

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