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Thread: Lightning @ NUS

  1. #21

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by satay16 View Post
    the reaons why you were unharmed is because all of you only either:

    1. Had only one foot on the ground that instant.
    2. The loci of the point equidistant from both your feet intersected with the point of lighting strike.


    if both your feet were on the ground that instant, and both feet were collinear with the point of lightning strike......................woah.................. .. beep bo beep bo beep


    bo.....................
    bro, where are you getting your info from...
    unless i misundrstood; regardless one foot on the ground or two, the point is you are grounded!!! electricity does not care one foot two foot or about any fancy word you want to use, it's seeking a path to ground and one foot is good enough...

    i dun think Cser was walking around with fiberglass insulated boots and regular shoes or slippers won't stop a high voltage arc from getting through your body to ground. i can't comment on fiberglass boots working to protect you from lightning because i never been hit with them on. but from experience i can tell you that they protect you around high voltage power lines.

    ...anyways, glad TS is okay

  2. #22

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by maddyks View Post
    engineering or science student?
    he's definitely science student. we engineering types will equate that as instantaneous.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawaiisg View Post
    bro, where are you getting your info from...
    unless i misundrstood; regardless one foot on the ground or two, the point is you are grounded!!! electricity does not care one foot two foot or about any fancy word you want to use, it's seeking a path to ground and one foot is good enough...

    i dun think Cser was walking around with fiberglass insulated boots and regular shoes or slippers won't stop a high voltage arc from getting through your body to ground. i can't comment on fiberglass boots working to protect you from lightning because i never been hit with them on. but from experience i can tell you that they protect you around high voltage power lines.

    ...anyways, glad TS is okay

    that's why he's a science student mah. too theoretical and not too practical about things

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by mervlam View Post
    that's why he's a science student mah. too theoretical and not too practical about things
    haha... satay dio flame again...

    btw, is NUS going to recreate THE FLASH? hope someone kena hoot...
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  5. #25

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Kena lightning then become sg's next superhero to VRman.....Lightningh Man ! Or a spokesperson for a certain group with a similar logo.

  6. #26

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by satay16 View Post
    applied physics count as what?
    Half half lah..

  7. #27

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by mervlam View Post
    he's definitely science student. we engineering types will equate that as instantaneous.
    Too idealistic lah.. Me, an RF engineer, will have take it to be about 3e8 m/s.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by satay16 View Post

    if both your feet were on the ground that instant, and both feet were collinear with the point of lightning strike......................woah.................. .. beep bo beep bo beep bo.....................
    beep bo beep bo beep bo also got no use liao.
    it should be *wail* *sob*sob*sob*sob*sob*sob*sob*sob...

    unfortuantely, i dun carry my cam around with me in sch.
    neither am i a fan of lightning.
    In fact, i'm damn scared to walk outside when i see lightning.
    at that point in time, the lightning was happening so fast and so near.
    even if you're prepared to capture the lightning, i guess you'll be too stunned to press the shutter.
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  9. #29

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by mojopy View Post
    beep bo beep bo beep bo also got no use liao.
    it should be *wail* *sob*sob*sob*sob*sob*sob*sob*sob...

    unfortuantely, i dun carry my cam around with me in sch.
    neither am i a fan of lightning.
    In fact, i'm damn scared to walk outside when i see lightning.
    at that point in time, the lightning was happening so fast and so near.
    even if you're prepared to capture the lightning, i guess you'll be too stunned to press the shutter.
    You'll have to press the shutter first anyway.. Capturing lightning takes a lot of patience and luck.

  10. #30

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    MY friend and I went for a racce trip at mount ophir 10 years ago and we spent a night at the summit... after midnight we could see the thunder cloud moving angrily towards our side..

    what we have is only a bashas type of make shift tent...just a flysheet as a roof set at a very low angle to hide from strong wind and with two pole plus ground sheet at the bottom... (no money and wanted light weight mah..)

    it rain heavily for 3 hours and the lightings really light up the whole summit like daylight... we were scare stiffed then... but only some of our items was wet due to the mini flood cause by rain fall...
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  11. #31
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    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by Verticoastro View Post
    MY friend and I went for a racce trip at mount ophir 10 years ago and we spent a night at the summit... after midnight we could see the thunder cloud moving angrily towards our side..

    what we have is only a bashas type of make shift tent...just a flysheet as a roof set at a very low angle to hide from strong wind and with two pole plus ground sheet at the bottom... (no money and wanted light weight mah..)

    it rain heavily for 3 hours and the lightings really light up the whole summit like daylight... we were scare stiffed then... but only some of our items was wet due to the mini flood cause by rain fall...
    Sound scared leh..walao..I think I would run home very fast if I saw the angry cloud..Don't wana risk my life...
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  12. #32

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawaiisg View Post
    bro, where are you getting your info from...
    unless i misundrstood; regardless one foot on the ground or two, the point is you are grounded!!! electricity does not care one foot two foot or about any fancy word you want to use, it's seeking a path to ground and one foot is good enough...

    i dun think Cser was walking around with fiberglass insulated boots and regular shoes or slippers won't stop a high voltage arc from getting through your body to ground. i can't comment on fiberglass boots working to protect you from lightning because i never been hit with them on. but from experience i can tell you that they protect you around high voltage power lines.

    ...anyways, glad TS is okay
    *beep* wrong.

    so what if you are grounded? the lightning did not strike on his head.

    when lightning strike the ground, the point it strike has the highest potential difference as compared to earth's 0 voltage. due to resistance of the ground, when you get further and further away from the point of lightning strike, voltage decreases, like a pattern of concentric circles. so, if both feets are on the same equipotential lines, there isn't any potential difference across the feet, therefore, no current will flow. if one leg is on the ground, better still, cos it would be like connecting the positive terminal of a battery back to the positive terminal of the same battery, aka, still no potential difference.

    but if the feet and point of lightning strike are collinear, it means that both feet are stepping on different equipotential lines. this causes a potential difference across the feet. how large is the potential you might ask. very very large. reason being the ground is of relatively high resistance, and the rate of decrease of potential is proportionate to the ground's resistance. so, it means that a small change in distance can cause a large potential difference. so, now, it becomes like having a few thousand volts of electricity across both feet, the further the separation of the feet, the more lethal the shock.

    this is why sometimes, when you see those lighning accidents in soccer matches, you noticed that only some players get hurt even though the others are close to them. this is the explaination why. you might ask why they dun teach about this in lightning preventioan class. the thing is you dunno where the lightning can hit, so the best deal is to actually lie on the ground, cos you will then become part of the ground. though the distance separation is large, every point on your body is at the same potential as the ground, therefore, no harm done.

    btw, this is also the explanation of why cows always(or mostly) die in lightning strikes. i mean, erm...........look at the separation of their front and hind legs.

    and nope, i did not get this infomation from any website. what for? it is all logical thinking. lazy to google or wiki.
    Last edited by satay16; 29th March 2007 at 11:29 AM.

  13. #33

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by lsisaxon View Post
    Too idealistic lah.. Me, an RF engineer, will have take it to be about 3e8 m/s.
    well it depends on which field of engineering too. RF engineers use 3e8 m/s for speed of light in calculations.

    I, network engineer, don't need to be overly precise, so that short period of time equates to instantaneous lor

  14. #34

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by Del_CtrlnoAlt View Post
    haha... satay dio flame again...

    btw, is NUS going to recreate THE FLASH? hope someone kena hoot...
    satay raw no good, must be cooked just right then nice mah

  15. #35
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    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by mervlam View Post
    satay raw no good, must be cooked just right then nice mah
    abit burnt better...
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  16. #36
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    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by satay16 View Post
    *beep* wrong.

    so what if you are grounded? the lightning did not strike on his head.

    when lightning strike the ground, the point it strike has the highest potential difference as compared to earth's 0 voltage. due to resistance of the ground, when you get further and further away from the point of lightning strike, voltage decreases, like a pattern of concentric circles. so, if both feets are on the same equipotential lines, there isn't any potential difference across the feet, therefore, no current will flow. if one leg is on the ground, better still, cos it would be like connecting the positive terminal of a battery back to the positive terminal of the same battery, aka, still no potential difference.

    but if the feet and point of lightning strike are collinear, it means that both feet are stepping on different equipotential lines. this causes a potential difference across the feet. how large is the potential you might ask. very very large. reason being the ground is of relatively high resistance, and the rate of decrease of potential is proportionate to the ground's resistance. so, it means that a small change in distance can cause a large potential difference. so, now, it becomes like having a few thousand volts of electricity across both feet, the further the separation of the feet, the more lethal the shock.

    this is why sometimes, when you see those lighning accidents in soccer matches, you noticed that only some players get hurt even though the others are close to them. this is the explaination why. you might ask why they dun teach about this in lightning preventioan class. the thing is you dunno where the lightning can hit, so the best deal is to actually lie on the ground, cos you will then become part of the ground. though the distance separation is large, every point on your body is at the same potential as the ground, therefore, no harm done.

    btw, this is also the explanation of why cows always(or mostly) die in lightning strikes. i mean, erm...........look at the separation of their front and hind legs.

    and nope, i did not get this infomation from any website. what for? it is all logical thinking. lazy to google or wiki.
    btw... u are talking about a big possibility that...

    1) all of them are barefooted...
    2) its raining darn heavily...
    3) all of them are super conductive...

    u know y cows always die in lightning strikes and not birds on a wire?

    cos
    1, cows dun wear shoes...
    2, cows have 2 antennas... higher possibility of getting electricuted...
    3, cows are primary source of meat for satay, not birds... chickens can't fly on wires...
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  17. #37

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by Del_CtrlnoAlt View Post
    btw... u are talking about a big possibility that...

    1) all of them are barefooted...
    2) its raining darn heavily...
    3) all of them are super conductive...
    1) try protecting yourself from 300000 volts of electricity with shoes.
    2) if it is raining darn heaviliy, most of the current would take the path of lesser resistance, which is the layer of rainwater on the ground, causing lesser damage to be done. you are in total contradiction.
    3) at high voltages, even the strongest insulators becomes conductors, relatively speaking.


    edit: just to make it clear, the case i am showing now is for harm that is done due to current flowing through the legs. i believe even kindergarden kids know about how lightning kills if striked on the head. believe or not, that's not the common way how lightning kills people. most are harmed or killed by the high potential difference on the ground, causing a sudden surge of deadly current to flow through them. so, just to clarify, i'm not talking about lightning rods or antennas of any sort. that's not the kind i am talking about.
    Last edited by satay16; 29th March 2007 at 12:18 PM.

  18. #38
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    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by satay16 View Post
    1) try protecting yourself from 300000 volts of electricity with shoes.
    2) if it is raining darn heaviliy, most of the current would take the path of lesser resistance, which is the layer of rainwater on the ground, causing lesser damage to be done. you are in total contradiction.
    3) at high voltages, even the strongest insulators becomes conductors, relatively speaking.



    edit: just to make it clear, the case i am showing now is for harm that is done due to current flowing through the legs. i believe even kindergarden kids know about how lightning kills if striked on the head. believe or not, that's not the common way how lightning kills people. most are harmed or killed by the high potential difference on the ground, causing a sudden surge of deadly current to flow through them. so, just to clarify, i'm not talking about lightning rods or antennas of any sort. that's not the kind i am talking about.
    think u missed the whole point completely...

    1) Shoes are barrier, think about it... theory is, your 300000volt, confirm die, melt the rubber... but are you saying the lightning will confirm strike your leg, or maybe 1 cm away from your leg with a thick ankle chain with 1 end touching the ground...

    2) TS is supposed to be outside... so unless its raining heavily and they are drenched, then i suppose they are not as conductive... so, is a dry person more conductive or a wet person?

    3) An insulator is an insulator, a conductor is a conductor... nothing that can convert an insulator as a conductor... unless the force overcomes it which burns it along its path... which is another story altogether... still... the insulator is insulator... conductor is conductor...
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  19. #39

    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by Del_CtrlnoAlt View Post
    think u missed the whole point completely...

    1) Shoes are barrier, think about it... theory is, your 300000volt, confirm die, melt the rubber... but are you saying the lightning will confirm strike your leg, or maybe 1 cm away from your leg with a thick ankle chain with 1 end touching the ground...

    2) TS is supposed to be outside... so unless its raining heavily and they are drenched, then i suppose they are not as conductive... so, is a dry person more conductive or a wet person?

    3) An insulator is an insulator, a conductor is a conductor... nothing that can convert an insulator as a conductor... unless the force overcomes it which burns it along its path... which is another story altogether... still... the insulator is insulator... conductor is conductor...
    1) The ground is charged by the lightning strike. as long as you are on the ground, you are on the potential lines. this is ground strike. the person doesn't have to be hit directly to get harmed.

    2) you are talking about direct hits again. i am talking about ground strikes. different type of strikes.

    3) you better read up. there isn't such thing as a perfect insulator in the world. even air ionises under high voltages. unless you want to talk about vacumm.

  20. #40
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    Default Re: Lightning @ NUS

    Quote Originally Posted by satay16 View Post
    1) The ground is charged by the lightning strike. as long as you are on the ground, you are on the potential lines. this is ground strike. the person doesn't have to be hit directly to get harmed.

    2) you are talking about direct hits again. i am talking about ground strikes. different type of strikes.

    3) you better read up. there isn't such thing as a perfect insulator in the world. even air ionises under high voltages. unless you want to talk about vacumm.
    think...

    1) u suddenly ground strike... so u mean, 1 lightning strike, all on ground die?

    2) so ground strike no one is spared?

    3) so u mean, lightning strike, air become super static electricity and all mankind gets wiped out?
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