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Thread: Wat is an APS system

  1. #1
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    Default Wat is an APS system

    I see this APS film thingy. Wonder wat is the diff between this & the usual film we use.
    Also Fujo Nexia is it? Wat kinda film is dat?

    Wat r the advantages & specs dat makes then diff from normal film?

    Sorri. I dunno wat r these films.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Wat is an APS system

    Originally posted by markccm
    I see this APS film thingy. Wonder wat is the diff between this & the usual film we use.
    Also Fujo Nexia is it? Wat kinda film is dat?

    Wat r the advantages & specs dat makes then diff from normal film?

    Sorri. I dunno wat r these films.
    Considered obsolete.

    They are smaller than 35mm, designed for compact cameras. Easier to load - just drop-in. Can be processed mid-roll and re-used. Supports multiple formats in one roll : normal, panoramic, etc. Expensive to buy, expensive to process, expensive to print.

    Regards
    CK

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    Default

    Thanx. How about the Fuji Nexia? Izzit another type of special film?

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    Default

    I wonder if it is really considerd obsolete.... the main reason for it's decline is the influx of digital right?? At the time when it just came into singapore.... digital started to get really hot so APS had no chance to be popularised......

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    Originally posted by markccm
    Thanx. How about the Fuji Nexia? Izzit another type of special film?
    That's an APS film.

    Regards
    CK

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by Silverelf
    I wonder if it is really considerd obsolete.... the main reason for it's decline is the influx of digital right?? At the time when it just came into singapore.... digital started to get really hot so APS had no chance to be popularised......
    It's declared dead liao.

    Regards
    CK

  7. #7
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    Default

    You can still get APS, but film & development are more expensive, there are fewer cameras available for it, and the negative size is smaller than 35mm. That's why it's not popular.

  8. #8

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    I think that there are some serious myths about APS that need to be cleared.

    First and formost, the format is not dead yet, but it will probably die IMHO, based on the inconsistent and often dismal results that I have experienced. In case most of you do not know, Kodak has just just announced a new APS film, and you can read all about it here. http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/pres...30302-17.shtml Whether Kodak keeps to it's word is something else, as Kodak is known to make rescind on their announced intentions.

    Also, to clarify, you can't process (develop) a roll of APS film midway, and reuse it later. You can use a cartridge of APS film halfway, have it rolled back into the cartridge and use it again later on another day or even another camera. Catch is that the camera's must support the mid-roll capability. Difference from 35mm film is that the film will automatically advance to the next unused portion of the film. Once the film is developed, you can't use it like unexposed film. APS emulsions are not different from emulsions for 35mm today.

    One important advantage of the APS film format is that information (if the camera allows) like the aperture size, shutter speed, film speed, date and time etc can be stored on the negs.

    It is true that APS film is meant for P&S, where cameras can be into a form factor that is as small as something like the Canon Elph Jr. It is true that developing a roll of APS film costs marginally more, same goes for developing prints. It is also true that digital photography has seriously stifled the growth of APS, and fractionally similiar for 35mm. It is alo true that the smaller sized negatives turned off many photographers. What is more is that you will find it extremely hard to obtain APS film that is not ISO200 or ISO400 rated. There is only two choices of ISO100 film, one choice for ISO800 film, one choice for slide film and one choice for B&W film. Except for the ISO100 film from Kodak, you will not find the other film here in Singapore anymore. There is also a lack of decent camera bodies for APS film. Some exceptions are the Contax Tix and Canon's Elph Jr P&S, or the Canon IX and IX lite and Nikon Pronea SLRs.

    And the inconsistant and dismal results that I have got from APS film? Lots of grain, regardless of what APS film you use. Often you have to compensate for about half to one stop to get rid of the grain. And this may not even guarantee you sharper pictures with better detail. I had very good results from APS before, but that was from having my film developed in Hong Kong, where the price for deveoping APS and 35mm film is the same, and the prints came out as good as those from a 35mm. Took the same negs to local labs and the results were far inferior. One way of bringing out the best in APS film would be to use it in conjunction with a scanner.

  9. #9

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    I used to use APS cameras, mainly for their size.... and I carry the IXUS II everywhere I go. I also got the APS SLR, Canon IX, which is simply among the best SLR I ever had....no unnecesary features bloating it....just the lack of DOF preview is a bit wanting. its extremely compact and yet still comfortable to hold, coupled with the excellent n sturdy metal body.

    And the smaller format of the film (24mm) will cause a multiplier of 1.2, and yes the grain is rather bad but sunny shots of course dont see much of it, low light conditions will. As for MRC I don't think you can find one w/o nowadays.

    What I really like about APS is the ability to record shot settings - aperture, shutter, compensation, among others....good learning tool. And it's very easy to set the film to develop w/o compensation. The Panaroma feature is actually a crop and printed across 2 classic paper but its quite neat to look at....not that bad...I'm not a loupe looker.....

    Dead or not, I think it will....especially here....the typical want-cheap-want-good mentality, 3 formats available - Classic ($0.40), HDTV ($0.50) and Panaromic ($1). You be surprised it's still quite popular in regions like the States, because of its size (a bit smaller but its oval shape actually make it less bulky than 35mm)and convenient drop in loading.

    I still got abt 10rolls of unused APS film.......I dunno what to do with them now that DimageX is my snapshooter...... maybe I will just use them for panaroma shooting.... and the APS cameras are simply beautiful and sexy...at least they make excellent display items.

  10. #10

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    BTW the new Advantix B&W I saw at the website use C-41 process (ie negatives solutions) so if you print on color paper it will give a sepia tone..... but its ok if thats what u want....i personally have no preference, either wil look good when the scene is right for it. I guess the film is based on Kodak's own T400CN.

    And I like that fact that process film will be kept inside the catridge, much better storage.

    Contrary to belief that once you rewind the film on non-MRC cameras you cannot reload it (because the indicator shows 'exposed'), you can actually still do so...abeit unorthodox: simply use a screwdriver to rotate the indicator disc to 'unexposed'.

    And the MRC is foolproof, the reloading never missed on me. But I use Canon so I have no problems with 35mm film reloading, never missed a slot....hard to say for some other brands using slot counting. And I dont give a heck about the IR counter fogging IR film....I dont use it.

  11. #11
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    Default Anyone still using APS?

    after reading through this thread just now- I'm just wondering if anyone still uses the APS cameras esp the SLRs?

    regards

  12. #12

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    I don't think there will be many in Singapore. Probably used by people with APS PnS. Why do you ask?

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by ckiang
    It's declared dead liao.

    Regards
    CK
    Nonsense.

  14. #14
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    It is rather sad that film manufacturers discontinued the larger format 127 roll film and 126 cartridge film and later to introduce a smaller and grainier APS film.

    The APS format size is no better than the discontinued 110 cartridge film either.

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