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Thread: Shore line gaze

  1. #1

    Default Shore line gaze



    Technical Info:
    Body: EOS 400D
    Lens: EF 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 II USM
    Aperture: f/8
    Shutter speed: 1/125
    ISO Speed: 100
    Focal Length: 75mm (120mm in 35mm)


    Please duo duo zhi jiao...

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Melbourne/Singapore
    Posts
    1,250

    Default Re: Shore line gaze

    Just my 2 cents worth. Ignore if you think it's nonsense.

    1)What's the focus of this picture. It seems pretty busy. When i look at it, my eyes start searching for a focus point.

    2)Having said the above, can I know if there were waves? If so maybe you can slow down your shutter so as to capture movement of the waves, even the movement of the people.

    3)There's a pole sticking out @ the bottom right hand corner. Maybe you can PS that away.

    4)The horizon seems a little tilted, you can adjust that in PS too.

    Again, these are just my opinions.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Tampines.Sg
    Posts
    126

    Default Re: Shore line gaze

    nothing interesting le. color not vibrant. in fact, gloomy.
    Olympus E-500 c/w dual kit lenses
    Olympus C-730 Ultra Zoom

  4. #4

    Default Re: Shore line gaze

    Quote Originally Posted by Golgotha View Post
    Just my 2 cents worth. Ignore if you think it's nonsense.

    1)What's the focus of this picture. It seems pretty busy. When i look at it, my eyes start searching for a focus point.

    2)Having said the above, can I know if there were waves? If so maybe you can slow down your shutter so as to capture movement of the waves, even the movement of the people.

    3)There's a pole sticking out @ the bottom right hand corner. Maybe you can PS that away.

    4)The horizon seems a little tilted, you can adjust that in PS too.

    Again, these are just my opinions.

    Thanks. I seem to understand my shooting style problem better now - I constantly have the problem with my pictures having no central point of focus. But it seems so hard for me to correct that problem. Sometimes I simply shoot a seemingly beautiful scenary but is unable to find a subject. Any further advice for me?

  5. #5

    Default Re: Shore line gaze

    I think what make this scene attractive to you is the golden light - the sun's setting right? - the leading line, and the overhang on the river bank. You have positioned the latter at a natural focal point - about a third from the left edge - in the frame.

    What is missing is a subject there.

    And if that is so then there are extraneous elements you need to drop from your composition - either at the time of capture or via cropping after that - namely the white building in the far background and maybe the guy in blue in the left forground. And to adopt a maybe 2:1 format ration to emphasise the lines leading away.

    In other words, as it is, there is no picture for you to photograph as yet - the quintessential photographic moment is not there yet. You need to wait for some happening on the overhang, and only then shoot. Or you put some one there.

    But of course this is in hindsight. What you need to do is to practise seeing a picture in your mind before you shoot it. And with a digicam such a practice is easier than ever before - you can just shoot, preview, and do a self critique: asking yourself whether it is a picture or not. And then reshoot. Only be sure you dont miss the Kit Kat moment when you are busy previewing and not looking at the scene when it happens.

    Photography is all about timing. Unlike a painter, you are not as free to put elements in - or out - to make a picture that you saw or visualised. You have to wait for that moment.
    Last edited by espion; 1st March 2007 at 11:42 PM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Shore line gaze

    Quote Originally Posted by espion View Post
    ....In other words, as it is, there is no picture for you to photograph as yet - the quintessential photographic moment is not there yet. You need to wait for some happening on the overhang, and only then shoot. Or you put some one there....
    The most important & appreciated line!

    I read about this in magazines & how the pros find "special" moments. But I never realise I could have applied that in my photography.

    This is the kind of advice I need! Thanks!!

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